Author Topic: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages  (Read 84380 times)

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #80 on: August 22, 2014, 02:48:52 AM »
. . . with Rob Newman at a Wimpy's?
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #81 on: December 10, 2014, 08:43:18 AM »

Scriabin: Prélude cis-moll (left hand) with Yuja Wang
live at the Wiener Konzerthaus




<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/v3uaXw8k8As" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/v3uaXw8k8As</a>

Offline San Antone

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #82 on: March 31, 2015, 08:01:25 AM »
I just posted this article, ANTECEDENTS OF AMBIENT MUSIC, on my music blog, musicakaleidoskopea.

I also have some composer interviews and a section where I post clips of my recent music.

Offline torut

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #83 on: March 31, 2015, 03:40:15 PM »
I just posted this article, ANTECEDENTS OF AMBIENT MUSIC, on my music blog, musicakaleidoskopea.

I also have some composer interviews and a section where I post clips of my recent music.

It is a very interesting article. Few random thoughts...
- Did Satie compose Vexation as furniture music? The melody is so strange and characteristic that it seems difficult to ignore it. (Not saying that the piece could not have influenced later ambient music.)
- Riley followed Eno? His hypnotic organ works The Persian Surgery Dervishes (recorded in 1972) and The Descending Moonshine (recorded in 1975) predated Music for Airports (1978).
« Last Edit: March 31, 2015, 03:48:53 PM by torut »

Offline San Antone

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #84 on: March 31, 2015, 03:55:44 PM »
It is a very interesting article. Few random thoughts...
- Did Satie compose Vexation as furniture music? The melody is so strange and characteristic that it seems difficult to ignore it. (Not saying that the piece could not have influenced later ambient music.)
- Riley followed Eno? His hypnotic organ works The Persian Surgery Dervishes (recorded in 1972) and The Descending Moonshine (recorded in 1975) predated Music for Airports (1978).

Thanks for reading the article, and thanks for your comments. 

I did not mean to imply that Vexations was written as furniture music, only that it could also be seen as containing some of the definitive aspects of ambient music, which might seen as an outgrowth of Dada.  And the reason I put Riley after Eno was simply because Music for Airports was a seminal recording and became the context from which to interpret Riley and the other Minimalists.  At least that is my hypothesis.

But you make a good point, and I might include your chronology in an edit of the piece.

 :)
« Last Edit: March 31, 2015, 04:11:02 PM by sanantonio »




jlaurson

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #88 on: May 29, 2015, 04:49:42 AM »

Fresh from Forbes:



MAY 29, 2015 @ 3:01 PM
Boxing Classical Music: Ferenc Fricsay on Deutsche Grammophon

There’s something wonderful about classical music—certainly in its form as recorded music—having
become a commodity: It is more easily available than ever before, in greater variety than ever before,
and at a lower cost than ever before. Notable part of this trend is the packaging and re-packaging and
re-releasing of trusty records as part of box sets. Everything by everyone seems available affordably—
and we are talking about the physical product, not downloads, which you might think would spearhead
this development… perhaps even at the expense of the trusty CD.

Box sets used to be expensive, much cherished trophies of the collector. I remember my first set of
complete Beethoven Sonatas (incidentally not a particularly satisfying set, as it would eventually turn
out) and my first Ring Cycle (still a worthy member of the collection) and the hushed reverence that
went along with their purchase. With the tumbling of prices, that’s changed entirely (furthered by the
budgetary constraints that are not those of one’s student days). There are still some box sets that are
expensive, made with great care, and easy to covet. But more-so it has become a trend for labels to
use sets to manufacture bargain-basement collections that can be had for a few bucks per disc and
entice listeners to fill gaps in their collections they might not otherwise have had bothered or bee able
to fill....

Offline Michael Sayers

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #89 on: June 11, 2015, 02:20:25 AM »
I've started a blog recently.  It seems like a good way to circulate information and material, and to keep people updated without being intrusive and possibly annoying by such things as sending out emails to all of one's friends and acquaintances - they can just check the blog (or not) based on their interest level.

https://michaelsayers.wordpress.com/


Mvh,
Michael



jlaurson

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #92 on: July 02, 2015, 05:32:21 AM »
Latest on ionarts: The 11th (!) installment of the Beethoven Survey!




Beethoven Sonatas - A Survey of Complete Cycles
The Great Incomplete Cycles



http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2015/07/beethoven-sonatas-survey-of-complete.html


Which ones have I missed? What data did I get wrong?

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #94 on: July 02, 2015, 05:39:57 AM »
Sorry, the page you were looking for in this blog does not exist.

But Jens sent me here himself... :(

8)

Eeek!

http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2015/06/ionarts-at-large-heinz-holliger-haydn.html
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot




Offline San Antone

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #98 on: July 09, 2015, 10:16:44 AM »
Overview and Analysis of the Liszt Piano Sonata in B Minor, S. 178

It is likely that Liszt derived the idea of thematic transformation as a unifying process from Schubert’s Wanderer Fantasy, a work which he himself transcribed for piano and orchestra in 1851.  Schubert’s themes run through all four movements of the fantasy in varied forms  The four movements are played without a break, and outline a symmetrical key scheme— C, E, A flat, C.  This kind of formal plan held a strong attraction for Liszt, and many of the works of his Weimar period follow this model, besides the Piano Sonata in B Minor also the first piano concerto is another example.

The sonata was published in the spring of 1854 and dedicated to Robert Schumann.  Liszt meant this as a reciprocal gesture to Schumann in response to his being the dedicatee of the latter’s Fantasy in C major (1839), a work that Liszt described as sublime.  However, Schumann never knew of the B Minor Sonata’s existence since by the time a copy of the newly published work arrived at the Schumann’s home in May, 1854, Schumann was already at the asylum at Endenich.

Clara Schumann could have included the work in her repertory, if she had been so inclined, but she chose not to do so. In her diary she described the sonata as “a blind noise … and yet I must thank him for it. … It really is too awful.” (Litzmann, Berthold, 1902-08)

Unfortunately, Clara’s opinion was not atypical.  During this period, and especially in this part of Germany, Liszt was often treated to an unkind dismissal by the musical society.  When the work received its première performance, in Berlin, on January 22, 1857, nearly four years after its composition, it provoked a minor scandal among the conservative critics, from which it recovered with difficulty. Rarely did such great music get off to a less promising start.  (Walker, 1983)

Liszt always felt that the new music he and his group (Chopin, Berlioz, Wagner) were writing needed new forms for expression.  He did not see the sense in merely pouring their “new pudding” into an old form.  Consequently he created new forms which would allow him greater flexibility while still maintaining unity (and echoing the old sonata form in basic structure). This he did with the Sonata, the Concerto in E flat and the Faust Symphony.

The principle which he established was an important one for future generations; the serial technique of Schoenberg, for instance, uses precisely the methods of Liszt’s thematic transformation within the framework of an entirely different language, and it is even possible that future twelve-note composers will turn to forms resembling Liszt’s rather than those of the classical composers in the search for a type of framework to correspond to their new methods of expression. In any case Liszt’s Sonata remains a landmark in the history of nineteenth-century music, not only as a highly successful application of new technical methods, but as a fine, moving and dramatic work in itself. (Buechner and Searle, 2013)

No other work of Liszt has attracted anything like the same amount of scholarly attention as the B-minor Sonata.  The number of divergent theories it has provoked from those of its admirers who feel constrained to search forbidden meanings are many.

The sonata is a musical portrait of the Faust legend , with “Faust,” “Gretchen,” and “Mephistopheles” themes symbolizing the main characters. (Ott, 1981)
The sonata is autobiographical; its musical contrasts spring from the conflicts within Liszt’s own personality. (Raabe, 1931)
The sonata is about the divine and the diabolical; it is based on the Bible and on Milton’s Paradise Lost. (Szász, 1984)
The sonata is an allegory set in the Garden of Eden; it deals with the Fall of Man and contains “God,” “Lucifer,” “Serpent,” “Adam,” and “Eve” themes. (Merrick, 1987)
The sonata has no programmatic allusions; it is a piece of “expressive form” with no meaning beyond itself— a meaning that probably runs all the deeper because of that fact. (Winklhofer, 1980)
Liszt was generally silent about this work and offered no words of any kind on the question of its program - or lack of it. (Walker, 1983)

The sonata unfolds in approximately 30 minutes of unbroken music. While its four distinct movements are rolled into one, the entire work is encompassed within the traditional Classical sonata scheme— exposition, development, and recapitulation.  Liszt has effectively composed a sonata within a sonata, which is part of the work's uniqueness.

Liszt was very economical with his thematic material, indeed, the very first page contains the three motivic ideas that provide the content, transformed throughout, for nearly all that follows.

RTRH

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Classical Music Blogs or Personal Webpages
« Reply #99 on: July 10, 2015, 02:28:38 AM »
Overview and Analysis of the Liszt Piano Sonata in B Minor, S. 178

It is likely that Liszt derived the idea of thematic transformation as a unifying process from Schubert’s Wanderer Fantasy, a work which he himself transcribed for piano and orchestra in 1851.  Schubert’s themes run through all four movements of the fantasy in varied forms  The four movements are played without a break, and outline a symmetrical key scheme— C, E, A flat, C.  This kind of formal plan held a strong attraction for Liszt, and many of the works of his Weimar period follow this model, besides the Piano Sonata in B Minor also the first piano concerto is another example.

The sonata was published in the spring of 1854 and dedicated to Robert Schumann.  Liszt meant this as a reciprocal gesture to Schumann in response to his being the dedicatee of the latter’s Fantasy in C major (1839), a work that Liszt described as sublime.  However, Schumann never knew of the B Minor Sonata’s existence since by the time a copy of the newly published work arrived at the Schumann’s home in May, 1854, Schumann was already at the asylum at Endenich.

Clara Schumann could have included the work in her repertory, if she had been so inclined, but she chose not to do so. In her diary she described the sonata as “a blind noise … and yet I must thank him for it. … It really is too awful.” (Litzmann, Berthold, 1902-08)

Unfortunately, Clara’s opinion was not atypical.  During this period, and especially in this part of Germany, Liszt was often treated to an unkind dismissal by the musical society.  When the work received its première performance, in Berlin, on January 22, 1857, nearly four years after its composition, it provoked a minor scandal among the conservative critics, from which it recovered with difficulty. Rarely did such great music get off to a less promising start.  (Walker, 1983)

Liszt always felt that the new music he and his group (Chopin, Berlioz, Wagner) were writing needed new forms for expression.  He did not see the sense in merely pouring their “new pudding” into an old form.  Consequently he created new forms which would allow him greater flexibility while still maintaining unity (and echoing the old sonata form in basic structure). This he did with the Sonata, the Concerto in E flat and the Faust Symphony.

The principle which he established was an important one for future generations; the serial technique of Schoenberg, for instance, uses precisely the methods of Liszt’s thematic transformation within the framework of an entirely different language, and it is even possible that future twelve-note composers will turn to forms resembling Liszt’s rather than those of the classical composers in the search for a type of framework to correspond to their new methods of expression. In any case Liszt’s Sonata remains a landmark in the history of nineteenth-century music, not only as a highly successful application of new technical methods, but as a fine, moving and dramatic work in itself. (Buechner and Searle, 2013)

No other work of Liszt has attracted anything like the same amount of scholarly attention as the B-minor Sonata.  The number of divergent theories it has provoked from those of its admirers who feel constrained to search forbidden meanings are many.

The sonata is a musical portrait of the Faust legend , with “Faust,” “Gretchen,” and “Mephistopheles” themes symbolizing the main characters. (Ott, 1981)
The sonata is autobiographical; its musical contrasts spring from the conflicts within Liszt’s own personality. (Raabe, 1931)
The sonata is about the divine and the diabolical; it is based on the Bible and on Milton’s Paradise Lost. (Szász, 1984)
The sonata is an allegory set in the Garden of Eden; it deals with the Fall of Man and contains “God,” “Lucifer,” “Serpent,” “Adam,” and “Eve” themes. (Merrick, 1987)
The sonata has no programmatic allusions; it is a piece of “expressive form” with no meaning beyond itself— a meaning that probably runs all the deeper because of that fact. (Winklhofer, 1980)
Liszt was generally silent about this work and offered no words of any kind on the question of its program - or lack of it. (Walker, 1983)

The sonata unfolds in approximately 30 minutes of unbroken music. While its four distinct movements are rolled into one, the entire work is encompassed within the traditional Classical sonata scheme— exposition, development, and recapitulation.  Liszt has effectively composed a sonata within a sonata, which is part of the work's uniqueness.

Liszt was very economical with his thematic material, indeed, the very first page contains the three motivic ideas that provide the content, transformed throughout, for nearly all that follows.

RTRH

It will be a pleasure to dig into this later, thank you.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot