Author Topic: Arthur Butterworth(1923-)  (Read 14936 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-2014)
« Reply #40 on: April 19, 2016, 12:21:06 PM »
Yet another composer to investigate that I never noticed on Classical radio.
He's got a pretty extensive works list.
Try the craggy sibelian Symphony 4. There is a fine recording on Dutton conducted by the composer:

« Last Edit: May 25, 2018, 09:32:36 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-2014)
« Reply #41 on: May 25, 2018, 09:30:04 AM »
I've been enjoying the Symphony 2 (on the double Lyrita CD shown above). It's dedicated to Sibelius and Nielsen and shows the influence of the former. It's a shorter work than the epic Symphony 4 and has a very fine slow movement inspired by the death, in an accident, of Butterworth's dog.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2018, 09:32:08 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-)
« Reply #42 on: April 04, 2019, 04:35:28 AM »
Ordered the Dutton twofer shown above with Symphonies 1 & 4 and the Viola Concerto. The recording of No. 1 from the British Symphonic Collection box is probably my favourite discovery from that set, so I'm happy to be exploring more of Butterworth's music.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-)
« Reply #43 on: April 04, 2019, 08:54:53 AM »
Ordered the Dutton twofer shown above with Symphonies 1 & 4 and the Viola Concerto. The recording of No. 1 from the British Symphonic Collection box is probably my favourite discovery from that set, so I'm happy to be exploring more of Butterworth's music.
It's a great double CD set. The sibelian Symphony No 4 is my favourite work by Butterworth and I prefer the Dutton performance to the Lyrita, although they are both excellent.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-)
« Reply #44 on: April 08, 2019, 02:33:44 AM »
The recording mentioned above arrived today, and I'm currently listening to the Viola Concerto for the first time.

Today I learned that Butterworth wound up writing 7 numbered symphonies in all, the last coming as recently as 2011. Hopefully at some point we may wind up with recordings of all of them. So far I've only seen recordings of 1, 2, 4 and 5.

UPDATE: Oh my goodness, the slow movement of this Viola Concerto is so eerie and atmospheric! It's sending chills down my spine.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2019, 02:56:26 AM by Maestro267 »

Offline Scion7

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-)
« Reply #45 on: July 26, 2021, 03:00:01 AM »
He passed away in 2014 - if anyone cares to update this topic.

I admire several of his pieces,
but none of us have an accurate picture of the man,
because so little of his music is available.
The chamber pieces, over 20 works, are nowhere to be found.

I do find the Violin concerto on YT a more enjoyable work than the commercial recording of the Viola concerto.
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline J

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-)
« Reply #46 on: July 26, 2021, 04:53:46 AM »
He passed away in 2014 - if anyone cares to update this topic.

The chamber pieces, over 20 works, are nowhere to be found.

Dutton did issue a disc with two Piano Trios & the Viola Sonata.


Offline relm1

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-)
« Reply #47 on: July 26, 2021, 05:20:29 AM »
He passed away in 2014 - if anyone cares to update this topic.

I admire several of his pieces,
but none of us have an accurate picture of the man,
because so little of his music is available.
The chamber pieces, over 20 works, are nowhere to be found.

I do find the Violin concerto on YT a more enjoyable work than the commercial recording of the Viola concerto.

Lots on youtube such as viola sonata, partita, trio, etc.  He himself didn't consider chamber music his native strength compared to brass and orchestral.  I really like his Passacaglia for Brass Op. 87 on a theme of Brahms based on Brahms finale from the fourth symphony.

Offline Scion7

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Re: Arthur Butterworth(1923-)
« Reply #48 on: July 26, 2021, 08:13:33 AM »
Dutton did issue a disc with two Piano Trios & the Viola Sonata.

From what I saw it is OOP, but one can find copies (for now).
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal