Author Topic: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas  (Read 41702 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Online Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 13763
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« on: May 27, 2008, 09:52:45 PM »


This is an easy recommendation: really excellent playing, very attractively priced and beautifully recorded.
Christine Schornsheim is an  imaginative player, with a direct, lively and dashing style. She plays different keyboard instruments: a harpsichord (CD's 1-3), a clavichord (CD 4), another harpsichord for CD's 5 & 7, and two fortepiano's for CD's 6, 8-13. I liked the concept - it brings interesting variety to a large set like this.
Very much recommended. :)

Instruments:
Double-manual harpsichord by William Dowd/ Reinhard von Nagel, Paris 1976
Unfretted clavichord by Burkhard Zander, Cologne 1999, replica of an instrument by Joseph Gottfried Horn, near Dresden 1788
Double-manual harpsichord by Jacob & Abraham Kirckman, London 1777
Fortepiano by Louis Dulcken, Munich 1793
Fortepiano (early grand piano) by John Broadwood & Son, London 1804

Q
« Last Edit: May 27, 2008, 09:55:18 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8145
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2009, 02:26:03 AM »
I own Haydn piano music recordings by Richter, Demidenko, Schiff, Gould, Hamelin and Brendel.

They are all very very good -- but I can't help thinking that the differences between them are important but rather subtle.

But there is one performer of Haydn's piano music whose approach seems radically different -- warmer, more beautiful, more feeling.

Pogorelich seems to inhabit a different world from the rest -- and I love his (two) sonatas more than all the others. His Number 19 is one of the gems of my collection.

But he has recorded just two sonatas. :'(
« Last Edit: February 02, 2009, 02:28:26 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Josquin des Prez

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3655
  • Lyric Suite, Opus131
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2009, 10:24:36 AM »
I have both Brendel and Richter and i never felt the need to get more. I used to have the complete brilliant set on fortepiano, which was interesting, but i just found the earlier sonatas to be boring after a while.

What happened to Pogorelich anyway? Last i head of him he wasn't being well, mentally i mean.  ;D I just recently got his Schumann and it's amazing. A real pity he records so little.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2009, 11:27:43 AM by Josquin des Prez »

Offline Herman

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1639
  • there's something wrong with my brain
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2009, 12:02:50 PM »
I own Haydn piano music recordings by Richter, Demidenko, Schiff, Gould, Hamelin and Brendel.

They are all very very good -- but I can't help thinking that the differences between them are important but rather subtle.

I'm sorry but I think there are huge differences between these performers. Richter brings a romantic soulfulness to Haydn; Brendel brings wit and humor; Schiff is a classicist; Hamelin is technical wizard who is IMO not very successful in Haydn. You could also check Pletnev's Haydn disc. And Horowitz.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8145
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2009, 12:09:18 PM »
.  .  .  but i just found the earlier sonatas to be boring after a while.
 

My favourite is that #19 by Pogorelich -- but I don't know if it's early or late -- I guess it's got quite a low number, but does it follow it's eraly?

Are there ant scholars who can help?

I know Ivo was ill in 2006 -- he cancelled some concerts. But I don't know what's happened to him since then.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8145
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2009, 12:12:42 PM »
I'm sorry but I think there are huge differences between these performers. Richter brings a romantic soulfulness to Haydn; Brendel brings wit and humor; Schiff is a classicist; Hamelin is technical wizard who is IMO not very successful in Haydn. You could also check Pletnev's Haydn disc. And Horowitz.

You're right, of course. I was exaggerating the similarities because Pogorelich seems so different.

Hamelin is challenging -- I don't find his Haydn appealing at all.

Thanks for reminding me of Pletnev -- I'm sure I heard it years ago in someone's house and liked it.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2009, 12:18:47 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Herman

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1639
  • there's something wrong with my brain
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2009, 01:29:36 PM »
On RCMR somebody mentioned one Luba (or Lyuba) Timofeyeva who's recorded the complete keyboard sonatas on a regular steinway as the best non-HIP complete (9cds). Is there anybody here who's familiar with this pianist?

Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13590
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2009, 02:39:04 PM »
On RCMR somebody mentioned one Luba (or Lyuba) Timofeyeva who's recorded the complete keyboard sonatas on a regular steinway as the best non-HIP complete (9cds). Is there anybody here who's familiar with this pianist?


I've never heard of this pianist, but my interest is piqued.  I still have John McCabe's complete set but find it uninvolving and plan to dump it at some point.  Ronald Brautigam is superb, but I just can't listen to fortepianos all that often.

A few other suggestions in addition to those mentioned already are Fazil Say, who is extremely willful but incredibly vibrant and fun; a very young Zoltan Kocsis on Hungaroton who plays with bite and enthusiasm; and a hard-to-find disc of superbly elegant playing by Jean Efflam Bavouzet on an obscure label whose name eludes me.  A new disc by Anton Kuerti may be worth exploring, too - I probably will before too long.  I find all preferable to, say, Gould or even Pogorelich.  I love how Pogo handles the fast movements, but he distends the slow movements too much to really be succesful over many listens.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 11733
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #8 on: February 02, 2009, 03:53:36 PM »
Well, a number of us here (including myself) own and have enjoyed the Christine Schornsheim 14-CD box set on Capriccio - however, these are on older instruments (i.e. harpsichord, clavichord, & fortepiano), so may not be 'what' you are interested in purchasing - I picked up this box at a great price (just can't remember where & for what @ the moment) - but you asked -  ;) ;D


Joe Barron

  • Guest
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #9 on: February 02, 2009, 03:56:44 PM »
I have Buchbinder's recording and have not felt the need to look any further. Anyone familiar with his performances?

imperfection

  • Guest
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #10 on: February 02, 2009, 04:26:44 PM »
I might be one of the only few who likes Hungarian pianist Jeno Jando's sonatas on Naxos. But his playing is so clean, elegant and nuanced that once I start listening to a sonata, I just can't stop.

Offline Coopmv

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11738
  • Mein Freund ist mein
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #11 on: February 02, 2009, 05:36:31 PM »
Ordered this set from MDT a few days ago ...

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8145
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #12 on: February 02, 2009, 11:29:03 PM »

I've never heard of this pianist, but my interest is piqued.  I still have John McCabe's complete set but find it uninvolving and plan to dump it at some point.  Ronald Brautigam is superb, but I just can't listen to fortepianos all that often.

A few other suggestions in addition to those mentioned already are Fazil Say, who is extremely willful but incredibly vibrant and fun; a very young Zoltan Kocsis on Hungaroton who plays with bite and enthusiasm; and a hard-to-find disc of superbly elegant playing by Jean Efflam Bavouzet on an obscure label whose name eludes me.  A new disc by Anton Kuerti may be worth exploring, too - I probably will before too long.  I find all preferable to, say, Gould or even Pogorelich.  I love how Pogo handles the fast movements, but he distends the slow movements too much to really be succesful over many listens.

Great post!

The Bavouzet sounds tempting -- I like his Debussy. You can download it here:

http://www.micmacmusic.com/product_info.php?products_id=42
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8145
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #13 on: February 03, 2009, 02:34:18 AM »
I'm sorry but I think there are huge differences between these performers. Richter brings a romantic soulfulness to Haydn; Brendel brings wit and humor; Schiff is a classicist; Hamelin is technical wizard who is IMO not very successful in Haydn. You could also check Pletnev's Haydn disc. And Horowitz.

I just compared the first movement of #40 in performances by Richter, Brendel and Hamelin (Day off work due to snow storms in London)

Richter uses colour and dynamic changes to great effect --  he makes you prick up your ears to hear every note. The end of the movement particularly fine, with quietly played notes adding to the drama and intensity. It's played at quite a sprightly pace, but it doesn't feel rushed. There's humanity and tenderness, as well as drama. Well recorded if a little closely miked.

I liked Brendel very much -- he's the slowest of the three but it's not portentous. There are flashes of wit now and then -- in the way he uses staccato, for example, and ornaments.

Hamelin played all the notes in the right order. It's fast. There's some variation in colour and dynamic range. His performance said nothing to me. It seemed completely emotionally cold, and it seemed to reveal nothing about the structure of the music.

So Herman was kind of right; and Brendel rules IMO, in this piece at least .

But what amazing music. Right now I feel like I want to spend my whole life listening to Haydn and Chopin!
« Last Edit: February 03, 2009, 05:42:22 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Herman

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1639
  • there's something wrong with my brain
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #14 on: February 03, 2009, 06:17:49 AM »
But what amazing music. Right now I feel like I want to spend my whole life listening to Haydn and Chopin!

Just do it baby. ;D

BTW Right now I'm listening to the Chopin Preludes, but I'll get Haydn nr 40 out later today.

Offline Josquin des Prez

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3655
  • Lyric Suite, Opus131
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2009, 06:57:11 AM »
So Herman was kind of right; and Brendel rules IMO, in this piece at least .

The whole set is amazing. He was pretty on fire when he recorded this, one of his finest sessions for sure.

Offline Herman

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1639
  • there's something wrong with my brain
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2009, 08:31:50 AM »
I liked Brendel very much -- he's the slowest of the three but it's not portentous. There are flashes of wit now and then -- in the way he uses staccato, for example, and ornaments.


An interesting recording of thee G major sonata is Schiff's. It's not one of my habits to recommend listening to Schiff, but his nr 40 is in the same vein as Brendel's but it just sounds more spontaneous, which is of great importance in Haydn's keyboard music.


Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8145
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2009, 08:53:56 AM »
The whole set is amazing. He was pretty on fire when he recorded this, one of his finest sessions for sure.

Thanks for telling me that -- I only have the few that are on his GPOTTC disc.

The set alsways seemed very expensive -- but what the hell! I'll just have to get it now.

Anyone want to by the Great Pianists disc?
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8145
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #18 on: February 04, 2009, 03:09:11 AM »
So today it's the turn of Sonata #52  -- Brendel, Richter and Hamelin.

The opening bars in Brendel are very impressive, and his piano tone is beautiful. But I felt he doesn't have the measure of this sonata at all. The first movement seems all over the place, with lots of pauses and sudden changes of tempo. It felt very disintegrated. And much the same can be said for the slow movement, I think. As with #40, Brendel is the slowest of the three.

Richter gives a good solid performance, very enjoyable. There are some very Richtarian moments -- a crashing chord about 5 minutes into the first movement for example. I like this one.

Hamelin is something else. Totally magical. He's fast, and that gives the first movement a real exciting quality. You never feel as though he's too driven or too motoric. He finds more feeling, and more interesting musical ideas,  in the second movement than either Brendel or Richter IMO. And there are some surprises-- moments where he brings out a hidden melody for example -- that are a delight for the ears. And he's witty, funny even. Lol moments.

So what a surprise. Hamelin takes the crown for this one. Richter a good second. Brendel also ran.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2009, 05:09:57 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8145
Re: Haydn Keyboard Sonatas
« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2009, 11:11:31 PM »

I can't recommend this CD more highly. Fazil Say is the real McCoy -- he's a high spirited, joyful virtoso. And these sonatas suit him to a tee. The performances are full of personality.

He's definately a pianist to look out for.

It's a totally life enhancing record.

Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Buying Music From Amazon?
Please consider using these links. A small percentage of every sale using these links is passed on to GMG and helps keep this forum online.
Amazon US
Amazon Canada
Amazon UK