Author Topic: Gurn's Classical Corner  (Read 506507 times)

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Offline Lethevich

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #280 on: March 17, 2009, 05:55:29 AM »
On the subject of the minuet, or menuet, or the 'ole classical scherzo', as I like to call it.  I seem to greatly prefer Haydn's to Mozart's in this regard.  :-\

Haydn, I also find, is simply the only composer who can write minuets of consistent musical value.
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Offline Gabriel

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #281 on: March 17, 2009, 05:31:08 PM »
Menuet IS a menuet while minuetto is like saying "in the style of a minuet". The difference is subtle.

I'm not so sure if this is the difference. To my understanding, minuet and menuetto are the same thing, in French and Italian respectively, as Lethe suggested. Now, another thing is the expression "tempo di menuetto", which would be closer to what Springrite suggests.

To an extent, I think this is as much continuum as any break from (say) JS Bach.

Improvisation had quite a role also in baroque. This makes me remember that this "control" over performances began - at least in opera - quite before 1800: one of Gluck's interests on the reform of stage music was to avoid excessive protagonism from the soloists, particularly coming from Italian opera. Part of this problem came from their flexibility for improvising ornamentations in an aria da capo or so.

The problem is that, from my perspective, Gluck's intervention can be assigned a parallel in the music of Beethoven or Hummel of half a century later, but the focus is not exactly the same. Gluck, by the restriction of these interventions, was looking for a greater dramatic effect, for the dramatic action was obviously suspended in an aria of several minutes long which repeated whole sections (Mozart's early operas show that this was very present even into the 1770s). In instrumental works, it's impossible to talk about dramatic effects proprio sensu, but it's evident that there was a progressive tendency to make every section as meaningful as possible. For this, it's not necessary to wait until Beethoven's or Rejcha's late classicism: for example, in middle classicism (I mean Mozart or Haydn) it's possible to see that recapitulation in sonata form could be very far from a simple copy of exposition. So I can just agree with Karl when he states:

I suppose that part of the shading into the Romantic from the Classical, is the allied idea of making every note count, in a sense.  A resistance to repeating oneself;  not that Mozart or Haydn (any more than Vivaldi or Bach) were 'churning out copy', of course. But a sort of attitude adjustment over time.

The attitude was indeed adjusted. The great thing is that there is great music before, during, and after the adjustment; and also that the rediscovery of the role of improvisation before 1800 is making performances of works composed in those times, in my opinion, much more exciting.

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #282 on: March 17, 2009, 05:47:51 PM »
I am confused by the qualification at least into the early compositions here;  Beethoven employed sonata design practically to his last score. (To say nothing of Brahms and later . . . .)  Or am I misreading you?

Hello Karl - you know that I'm not in your professional 'league' here - what I meant is that Ludwig's early compositions were more attuned to those of Haydn & Mozart, using the 'sonata form' perfected arguably by those two composers; Beethoven after the Eroica Symphony in 1803 and beyond seemed to start evolving into a more Romantic style (whatever definition that may be - obviously, the 'emotional' interchanges between Gurn & Gabriel) - of course, he still used the 'sonata format' but you are a better interpreter of that issue that I can ever be -  :-\

I just find that the transition between the so-called Classic & Romantic Eras less a change in 'how' the music was constructed, i.e. using 'sonata form' or a variant vs. more of an emphasis on emotional interpretations & inter-relationships w/ other arts of the times, e.g. literature.

Now, Karl, why are you 'picking' on me in this discussion?  I'm just an old tenured Professor of Radiology?  Thanks for the comments - Dave  ;) :D

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #283 on: March 17, 2009, 06:00:47 PM »
Hey, Dave,
Well, no winning now, you are under Karl's boot in perpetuity. ;D

Quote
I just find that the transition between the so-called Classic & Romantic Eras less a change in 'how' the music was constructed, i.e. using 'sonata form' or a variant vs. more of an emphasis on emotional interpretations & inter-relationships w/ other arts of the times, e.g. literature.

This is an interesting statement, and one I agree with (without the emotion I have expended on Gabriel, of course  :D ). I think that one can put it in simpler terms and say that Classical music is more objective (from the composer's POV) and Romantic more subjective.

And another thing I would add is that Classical music is a collaboration between composer and listener; i.e. - the listener is actually expected to think about what he is hearing and draw conclusions from that, while in Romantic music the composer has done the thinking for you and you just follow along wherever he wants to take you. To tie in with our ongoing line of discussion, this is one of the primary reasons why improvisation disappeared during this time and "play it as written" became the accepted style.

8)


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Offline Gabriel

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #284 on: March 17, 2009, 06:02:28 PM »
Hello Karl - you know that I'm not in your professional 'league' here - what I meant is that Ludwig's early compositions were more attuned to those of Haydn & Mozart, using the 'sonata form' perfected arguably by those two composers; Beethoven after the Eroica Symphony in 1803 and beyond seemed to start evolving into a more Romantic style (whatever definition that may be - obviously, the 'emotional' interchanges between Gurn & Gabriel) - of course, he still used the 'sonata format' but you are a better interpreter of that issue that I can ever be -  :-\

I just find that the transition between the so-called Classic & Romantic Eras less a change in 'how' the music was constructed, i.e. using 'sonata form' or a variant vs. more of an emphasis on emotional interpretations & inter-relationships w/ other arts of the times, e.g. literature.

Now, Karl, why are you 'picking' on me in this discussion?  I'm just an old tenured Professor of Radiology?  Thanks for the comments - Dave  ;) :D

Anyway, Dave, it must be remembered that even if sonata form had an important role during classicism, it didn't represent the whole of music during this period. In larger instrumental works, it was generally used in the first movement, but in other movements it was not so often employed (excepting, perhaps, the cases of rondo-sonata form for the finales, but they are not general either).

Another contribution for the "emotion" of this thread... ;)

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #285 on: March 18, 2009, 05:54:17 PM »
Anyway, Dave, it must be remembered that even if sonata form had an important role during classicism, it didn't represent the whole of music during this period. In larger instrumental works, it was generally used in the first movement, but in other movements it was not so often employed (excepting, perhaps, the cases of rondo-sonata form for the finales, but they are not general either).

Another contribution for the "emotion" of this thread... ;)

To fortify that statement a bit, this note on Mozart's Prague Symphony:

"The so-called Prague Symphony is sometimes referred to by Germans as the Symphony ohne Menuett ("without minuet"); while Mozart had written such symphonies in his earlier years, this is the only one among the half-dozen composed in his Viennese years. What is far more unusual is that all three movements are in sonata form, a phenomenon perhaps unduplicated among Classical symphonies. Mozart and others (esp. Haydn) did indeed write a few works where all movements are in sonata form, it was a rarity. In fact, the other names by which sonata form is called give some hints to that; the 2 most common are "sonata-allegro" and "first movement form". Even the rondo had a long history before it was incorporated and given the required structure (exposition - (sometimes) development - recapitulation) to be adopted into the family. Something that Beethoven later accomplished (with the Op 34, 35 and WoO 80) with the long-standing variations, which had existed since the late 17th century at least. :)

8)



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Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #286 on: March 19, 2009, 04:47:45 PM »
A couple of pages back the subject of clavichords came up (in connection with CPE Bach). Here is a picture of Mozart's own clavichord, courtesy of the Mozarteum/Salzburg:



As you can see, it is far more portable than a piano, even the relatively smaller piano of the late 18th century. It also produces a far lower volume, although not entirely quiet. But the great attraction to composers of the Empfindsang was that it was very responsive to the player and could produce a tone which was very expressive. Bach was a master at taking full advantage of this capability in his works. It was reported that audience members actually wept as he played!  I would be interested in getting the reactions of any of you who have been fortunate enough to hear one in person. I have several recordings of them, and find them to be an acquired taste, but once acquired, one that steadily grows. :)

8)

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Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #287 on: March 19, 2009, 05:17:46 PM »
Another picture of a clavichord, this one showing a view as to how it is strung, and for those who are mechanically inclined, into how it works.





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Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #288 on: March 19, 2009, 05:49:10 PM »
The tangent piano (Tangentenflügel)

A few days ago, I was asked about the tangent piano. Other than typing out liner notes (which I hate), I was not able to find much. At the time, I described the sound as being, to me, like a harpsichord, even though it is a hammer strike and not a pluck.

I found this little article on tangent pianos. And as it turns out, I have 2 disks with music played on them. One is of 2 works by Mozart (with the lovely K 300g_395  Capriccio in C for Keyboard and K 315g_315a 8 Menuets for Keyboard) by Guy Penson (on Brilliant) and the other is Miklos Spanyi playing some concertos by C.P.E. Bach.

Here is an interesting article that I DID find, courtesy of AllExperts.com:

Tangent piano
The tangent piano is a very rare keyboard instrument that resembles a harpsichord and early pianos in design. It normally features five octaves of keys and the strings are acted upon by narrow wooden or metal slips when the keys are depressed.

History
In 1440, Arnault de Zwolle described what is believed to be the first keyboard instrument which used a tangent action. It is speculated that this was a clavichord or harpsichord. Pantaleon Hebenstreit is credited with the creation in 1705 of the first tangent piano. Christoph Gottlieb Schroter claimed that he invented the new tangent piano by letting blank harpsichord jacks hit the strings, also incorporating dampers into the action. A famous early piano maker, Gottfried Silbermann, was making 'pantaleons' by 1727. The Germans gave another name to the pantaleon, the Tangentenflügel and the English 'tangent piano.'

In 1777, Mozart referred to the tangent piano as the "Spattisches Klavier," after the maker of tangent pianos, Spath. Other names included the Italian cembalo angelico, and the French clavecin harmonieux et celeste. This is all evidence that the tangent piano spread throughout Europe. By the earliest decade of the 19th century, Spath tangent pianos were sent all over the globe and given a wide 6 octave range, which enabled it to compete with the piano. At the same time, the fortepiano began to eclipse the harpsichord and clavichord as the keyboard instrument of choice.

The creation of the tangent piano, and the fortepiano, was a result of an attempt to remedy the lack of dynamics in harpsichord sound. Both the tangent piano and fortepiano offered a variety of sound that was appealing to the changes in classical music, which featured more expressiveness and intensity than the harpsichord could offer. The tangent piano had a short life in popularity, and dropped off somewhere in the late 1700s or early 1800s. The fortepiano, however, buried the harpsichord in popularity by 1800. It then slowly evolved to the massive modern iron-framed giant of 88 keys. The tangent piano's popularity lasted for such a short time, that very little music was written for it. It is possible that CPE Bach's keyboard concerti were written for this instrument or for the fortepiano. In either case, the tangent piano is an appropriate choice for the keyboard instrument in the concerti. In addition, other sons of the famous German composer JS Bach wrote pieces expressly for the tangent piano. Miklos Spanyi recently released a recording for them on the tangent piano.

Tonal quality
The tangent piano has an unusual sound that fuses the qualities of the harpsichord and piano. The treble resembles the bright sound from a light action piano, and the bass resembles the bass from a harpsichord. The sound from instrument to instrument varies, as does one's personal description of the tangent piano's sound.

And a little picture. The few pictures I found weren't very revealing or the architecture, beyond that they resemble a clavichord with the strings running perpendicular to the keys:



Anyway, the best thing is to hear one. If you happen to have Brilliant's Mozart "Big Box", you can hear the Penson Mozart there. You may have done, and not even realized it was a tangent piano!  :)

8)


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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #289 on: March 20, 2009, 02:32:18 PM »
Gurn - thanks for the notes on the Clavichord & Tangent Piano - next on my 'to do list' is an exploration of some of the recommendations already made on these instruments; I've picked up some Lute Harpsichord recently, so now must add a few discs of these 'other' keyboard instruments; BTW, for those wanting to experience the clavichord in a more modern recording, a favorite of mine from the time of release (shown below), i.e. Oscar Peterson & Joe Pass performing Porgy & Bess on clavichord & guitar, respectively - wonderful!  :D


Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #290 on: March 20, 2009, 02:52:38 PM »
Pertinent to this post, a book & a composer from the transitional galant period:

Haydn, Mozart, and the Viennese School:  1740-1780 by Daniel Heartz (1995) - first volume of a triology!  :D  This is an inter-library load from the North Carolina School of the Arts (now part of the UNC state school system) in my home town; over 700+ pages - I'll not be reading this book 'word for word', the detail is just too much, but will be concentrating on some of the history and the major players in this 40 year period; but it is amazing 'how much' Heartz has gathered up in his research.

Today, read a long section of chapter 2 dedicated to the composer/teacher, Georg Christoph Wagenseil (1715-1777); his major influence occurred during the reign of Maria Theresa (Joseph II mother, i.e. the Emperor from 'Amadeus' fame), roughly 1740-60 (and later), but the guy apparently wrote a TON of music of all types, including much instrumental compositions, little of which seems to have been recorded - the only CD that I own is also shown below - Symphonies w/ Michi Gaigg & the L'Orfeo Barockorchester - there are 5 symphonies on the disc (numbered WV from 351 to 441; obviously much more in-between, and before/after) - these works are not 'heavy weights' like later Haydn & Mozart, but apparently Wagenseil was an important influence on Haydn & JC Bach (and likely many others) - would be very interested in some of this other works and recordings suggestions, although I don't believe a lot more exists!  Now, before & after the pages in this book by Heartz, a dozen or more composers quite famous in Vienna at the times were listed (again, I skipped over these 'unknowns' to me) and I checked Amazon & Arkiv, virtually nothing - boy, this is one city in a half century period - I just cannot imagine the AMOUNT of music that has been lost - mind boggling!  :o


 

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #291 on: March 20, 2009, 04:52:20 PM »
Pertinent to this post, a book & a composer from the transitional galant period:

Haydn, Mozart, and the Viennese School:  1740-1780 by Daniel Heartz (1995) - first volume of a triology!  :D  This is an inter-library load from the North Carolina School of the Arts (now part of the UNC state school system) in my home town; over 700+ pages - I'll not be reading this book 'word for word', the detail is just too much, but will be concentrating on some of the history and the major players in this 40 year period; but it is amazing 'how much' Heartz has gathered up in his research.

Today, read a long section of chapter 2 dedicated to the composer/teacher, Georg Christoph Wagenseil (1715-1777); his major influence occurred during the reign of Maria Theresa (Joseph II mother, i.e. the Emperor from 'Amadeus' fame), roughly 1740-60 (and later), but the guy apparently wrote a TON of music of all types, including much instrumental compositions, little of which seems to have been recorded - the only CD that I own is also shown below - Symphonies w/ Michi Gaigg & the L'Orfeo Barockorchester - there are 5 symphonies on the disc (numbered WV from 351 to 441; obviously much more in-between, and before/after) - these works are not 'heavy weights' like later Haydn & Mozart, but apparently Wagenseil was an important influence on Haydn & JC Bach (and likely many others) - would be very interested in some of this other works and recordings suggestions, although I don't believe a lot more exists!  Now, before & after the pages in this book by Heartz, a dozen or more composers quite famous in Vienna at the times were listed (again, I skipped over these 'unknowns' to me) and I checked Amazon & Arkiv, virtually nothing - boy, this is one city in a half century period - I just cannot imagine the AMOUNT of music that has been lost - mind boggling!  :o

Interesting post, Dave. I've wanted that book since I first saw it 5 or 6 years ago. My local library wasn't able to get a copy of it (but they aren't affiliated with a major university either). Darn the bad luck... >:(

I don't have any Wagenseil, not even as little as you do. But he features prominently in several books and essays I have on Haydn. As you note, he is a big early influence. Your mention of a lot of unknown music from this period in Vienna reminds me that in Zaslaw's "Mozart's Symphonies" book, he mentions that while looking at manuscripts in Vienna, there were in that one collection (Friends of Music) literally thousands of unknown manuscripts of just symphonies from the latter half of the 18th century. Surely a conservative estimate of 3% that had solid musical worth even would make for lots of new and interesting listening. :-\

8)

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #292 on: March 20, 2009, 06:13:01 PM »
Interesting post, Dave. I've wanted that book since I first saw it 5 or 6 years ago. My local library wasn't able to get a copy of it (but they aren't affiliated with a major university either). Darn the bad luck... >:(

I don't have any Wagenseil, not even as little as you do. But he features prominently in several books and essays I have on Haydn. As you note, he is a big early influence. Your mention of a lot of unknown music from this period in Vienna reminds me that in Zaslaw's "Mozart's Symphonies" book, he mentions that while looking at manuscripts in Vienna, there were in that one collection (Friends of Music) literally thousands of unknown manuscripts of just symphonies from the latter half of the 18th century. Surely a conservative estimate of 3% that had solid musical worth even would make for lots of new and interesting listening....

Gurn - believe that you would like that 'sole' Wagenseil disc that I own - but regarding his pretty much dominance as the court 'sweetheart' composer during the reign of Joesph II's Mother, Maria Theresa, he seems to have been almost completely forgotten!  And that single disc that I own is quite a pleasant listen, and an instructive 'bridge' between the Baroque-Classical periods - boy, what a lost!

But, I have that book opened @ the moment and just to mention some of the composers around the time of Wagenseil (and again they must have written hundreds of compositions, both vocal, instrumental, and combined) - Georg Reutter (who recruited the young Joseph Haydn as a singer), Franz Tuma, Matthias Monn, Wenzel Birck, Joseph Ziegler, and Schloger, Starzer, Asplmayr - and even many others mentioned more briefly in these pages - again, I'll be unable to really read this DETAILED book thoroughly but the author has certainly done a superlative job!

I'll try to periodically 'report' the important details of those composers which have been recorded so we can at least hear their music; so far, Wagenseil is the best choice, so far through the second chapter - Dave  :)

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #293 on: March 20, 2009, 06:22:41 PM »
Gurn - believe that you would like that 'sole' Wagenseil disc that I own - but regarding his pretty much dominance as the court 'sweetheart' composer during the reign of Joesph II's Mother, Maria Theresa, he seems to have been almost completely forgotten!  And that single disc that I own is quite a pleasant listen, and an instructive 'bridge' between the Baroque-Classical periods - boy, what a lost!

But, I have that book opened @ the moment and just to mention some of the composers around the time of Wagenseil (and again they must have written hundreds of compositions, both vocal, instrumental, and combined) - Georg Reutter (who recruited the young Joseph Haydn as a singer), Franz Tuma, Matthias Monn, Wenzel Birck, Joseph Ziegler, and Schloger, Starzer, Asplmayr - and even many others mentioned more briefly in these pages - again, I'll be unable to really read this DETAILED book thoroughly but the author has certainly done a superlative job!

I'll try to periodically 'report' the important details of those composers which have been recorded so we can at least hear their music; so far, Wagenseil is the best choice, so far through the second chapter - Dave  :)

If you'd like, I can read it for you and send you a nice summary... ;D

I have maybe 1 work each from half of those guys (like Monn and Tuma, for example), but mostly not. Just names in books. :(      I did discover that I have 1 work by Wagenseil, BTW. It is his trombone concerto, on a disk with several others from the 1760's (on Naxos, and I have it twice in fact, once on ... ummm, rats, can't remember. Hungaroton, I think). Anyway, I just listened to it again and it was as nice as I remembered. Anyway, not much from a guy who wrote so much, and who was such an influence on his peers. :-\

8)

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #294 on: March 20, 2009, 06:49:10 PM »
If you'd like, I can read it for you and send you a nice summary... ;D

I have maybe 1 work each from half of those guys (like Monn and Tuma, for example), but mostly not. Just names in books. :(      I did discover that I have 1 work by Wagenseil, BTW. It is his trombone concerto, on a disk with several others from the 1760's (on Naxos, and I have it twice in fact, once on ... ummm, rats, can't remember. Hungaroton, I think). Anyway, I just listened to it again and it was as nice as I remembered. Anyway, not much from a guy who wrote so much, and who was such an influence on his peers. :-\


Well, as bolded above, the book is due back by mid-April!  If I owned it, I'd probably read a chapter throughly a week at a time, but don't have that luxury -  :-\  The next chapter is completely on Gluck - yes I know that he was important but may be a 'skip' for me, BUT, then comes 'early' Haydn - the detail in this book is just phenomenal (now I can relate to that as a medical educator), but this book is really for an advanced musical college course; however, OTOH, just may be right up your alley!  ;) :D   Dave

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #295 on: March 20, 2009, 06:54:04 PM »
Well, as bolded above, the book is due back by mid-April!  If I owned it, I'd probably read a chapter throughly a week at a time, but don't have that luxury -  :-\  The next chapter is completely on Gluck - yes I know that he was important but may be a 'skip' for me, BUT, then comes 'early' Haydn - the detail in this book is just phenomenal (now I can relate to that as a medical educator), but this book is really for an advanced musical college course; however, OTOH, just may be right up your alley!  ;) :D   Dave

Gluck, eh? Sounds more up Gabriel's alley. :)  But yes, for me the more detail the merrier. When it comes down to it, I guess I'll just have to scrape up $250 or so and get the entire set. True, that's a lot of audio music to miss out on, but it's plenty of history to make up for it. :)

8)


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Cembalokonzerte D-Dur, F-Dur, Sinfonie Nr. 31 - Haydn, Joseph - Cembalokonzert D-Dur: Un poco Adagio
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Offline Anne

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #296 on: March 21, 2009, 12:03:33 AM »
If you're going to skip Gluck, I would recommend just one DVD - Orfeo ed Euridice It is very easy to listen to and very enjoyable. 

When I first learned that opera, I was playing it constantly because the music was so beautiful.  Somehow, Janet Baker, a very famous and widely respected singer and the orchestra - I can't praise the performance enough.  It was done during the Glyndebourne Festival.  It uses the Glyndebourne festival with Raymond Leppard conducting the London Philharmonic.  British mezzo-soprano, Janet Baker, chose to retire from the operatic stage singing the title role in Sir Peter Hall's acclaimed production of Orfeo ed Euridce.

TV Times said that the performance was one of her finest and most moving portrayals.
The Sunday Telegraph said it was a must for opera-goers.

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #297 on: March 21, 2009, 06:07:38 AM »
If you're going to skip Gluck, I would recommend just one DVD - Orfeo ed Euridice It is very easy to listen to and very enjoyable. 

When I first learned that opera, I was playing it constantly because the music was so beautiful.  Somehow, Janet Baker, a very famous and widely respected singer and the orchestra - I can't praise the performance enough.  It was done during the Glyndebourne Festival.  It uses the Glyndebourne festival with Raymond Leppard conducting the London Philharmonic.  British mezzo-soprano, Janet Baker, chose to retire from the operatic stage singing the title role in Sir Peter Hall's acclaimed production of Orfeo ed Euridce.

TV Times said that the performance was one of her finest and most moving portrayals.
The Sunday Telegraph said it was a must for opera-goers.

Thank you for that, Anne. Although Dave was actually talking about skipping the chapter on Gluck in that book he got. :)  I have read quite a bit about him myself, and I think his music is more interesting than HE is, if you take my meaning. That looks like a nice performance though, and could well end up on the shelf, even though I like more contemporary performances as a rule. ;)

8)
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #298 on: March 21, 2009, 06:30:00 AM »
Thank you for that, Anne. Although Dave was actually talking about skipping the chapter on Gluck in that book he got. :)  I have read quite a bit about him myself, and I think his music is more interesting than HE is, if you take my meaning. That looks like a nice performance though, and could well end up on the shelf, even though I like more contemporary performances as a rule. ;)


Hi Anne & Gurn - yes, I was planning to just 'skim' through the Gluck chapter; I've read much on this composer & his role in Vienna in the 18th century in the past, but the  Heartz book is just too long to 'delve over' every word - in fact, I did look at the Gluck chapter an hour ago - over 80 pages w/ 20+ devoted to Orfeo ed Euridice, so for those into this composer & this particular 'famous' work, almost a mini-book!  BTW, the opening on 'Musical Life in Vienna' spends another 20+ pages on the 'theaters' in Vienna duing the time period covered.  This book (and his other two are just as long, if not longer!) is a smörgåsbord, just so much that one can 'eat & digest' w/o collapsing!  ;) ;D

P.S. Now onto the 'early' Haydn chapter later today!  In fact, the box below just arrived yesterday, I'll start w/ the first disc!  8)


Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #299 on: March 21, 2009, 06:34:57 AM »
Hi Anne & Gurn - yes, I was planning to just 'skim' through the Gluck chapter; I've read much on this composer & his role in Vienna in the 18th century in the past, but the  Heartz book is just too long to 'delve over' every word - in fact, I did look at the Gluck chapter an hour ago - over 80 pages w/ 20+ devoted to Orfeo ed Euridice, so for those into this composer & this particular 'famous' work, almost a mini-book!  BTW, the opening on 'Musical Life in Vienna' spends another 20+ pages on the 'theaters' in Vienna duing the time period covered.  This book (and his other two are just as long, if not longer!) is a smörgåsbord, just so much that one can 'eat & digest' w/o collapsing!  ;) ;D

P.S. Now onto the 'early' Haydn chapter later today!  In fact, the box below just arrived yesterday, I'll start w/ the first disc!  8)



Ha! You DID commit, you rascal. And you will start with Symphony "A"?   IIRC, you will recognize that as one of the Op 1 or 2 string quartets... Of course, my mind is failing and I may be wrong... :)  Enjoy!

8)
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