Author Topic: Gurn's Classical Corner  (Read 502447 times)

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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #520 on: June 03, 2009, 05:52:18 PM »
I would just like to post some impressions on my recent trip to Austria, where I participated in the Haydn commemorations for the 200th anniversary of his death......................

Gabriel - thank you for the wonderful travelogue - I would have loved to enjoy those very experiences w/ you!  I consider such a trip almost 'religious' -  :D

My most recent similar feeling (not musical but historical) was a recent trip to Boston - took a day off from a medical meeting and took the subway to Braintree MA, south of Boston; visit to the John Adams houses (saw three) - homes of John & Abigail Adams & their son, John Quincy - both presidents of the USA - first time visit and just a special visit - love those thrilling experiences!   Dave  :)

Offline Gabriel

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #521 on: June 04, 2009, 02:14:00 AM »
Thanks for your kind comments on my Austrian musical experiences, my friends. :)

The concert hall, which I suppose was the Haydnsaal, was magnificent -- even through the idiot box! I cannot help but imagine how wonderful it would have been to experience it all live.

The Haydnsaal is unbelievably beautiful and its acoustics are remarkable. And the audience came from different parts of the world (I met people from the UK, Hong Kong and Germany), even if I think that naturally most of them were Austrians. I was surprised by the excellent organization: two weeks before the concert I received an e-mail explaining that there would be a live broadcast and so that all attendants should arrive on time because access would be forbidden after the beginning of the performance. (As a matter of fact, the three parts of the oratorio were played almost without any pause).

No wonder you were so quiet all weekend, you were having a momentous occasion!  I am envious, but above all, pleased that you were able to take part. :)

I was as quiet in GMG as in the Haydnsaal, with so magnificent music being performed so brilliantly! (I have no words for explaining the effect of "Und es ward Licht!" in the performance: I felt "brushed" by the music, as if a kind of "musical solar wind" had appeared. It is incredible that, even knowing what will happen, this moment does not lose its magnificence.

which I haven't heard yet, but which looks interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if Gabriel has heard it... :)

So you won't be surprised. ;D It is a very good CD, a good purchase for anyone interested in Haydn's or Mozart's quartets. They are not in the front line of the most excellent quartets of the period, but they are beautifully written. Even if Albrechtsberger was famous as teacher of counterpoint, he doesn't display any exaggerated profusion of it: these are austere works that invite for a pleasant listening. A very pleasant one, I'd say.

Gabriel - thank you for the wonderful travelogue - I would have loved to enjoy those very experiences w/ you!  I consider such a trip almost 'religious' -  :D

It was a very beautiful experience. When thinking that Haydn said (to Hummel I guess) that everything that was beautiful came from God, it was inevitable to link all the trip to Haydn's very religious approach to life: the visit to his mausoleum, the performance of Die Schöpfung - a religious composition -, and so on. :)

karlhenning

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #522 on: June 04, 2009, 03:10:21 AM »
Johann Georg Albrechtsberger (Composer)

Born: February 3, 1736 - Kloserneuburg, near Vienna, Austria
Died: March 7, 1809 - Vienna, Austria

[...]

Hmm;  more credible that Albrechtsberger "really" wrote Mozart, wot?  8)

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #523 on: June 04, 2009, 06:04:40 AM »
And there is this:

 

which I haven't heard yet, but which looks interesting. I wouldn't be surprised if Gabriel has heard it... :)

Gurn - thanks for bringing together that information on Albrechtsberger - he keeps 'popping up' in my readings of this era, but I own nothing by this composer (and not much seems available!).  Thanks to Gabriel on his comments about the disc you posted.  In perusing Amazon, another recording that was of interest to me is added above, i.e. String Trios (performances split w/ another composer, Johannes Sperger) - comments from anyone, please?  Dave  :)

snyprrr

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #524 on: June 04, 2009, 07:53:26 PM »
Hmm;  more credible that Albrechtsberger "really" wrote Mozart, wot?  8)

 >:D/ 0:)

Offline Brewski

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #525 on: June 05, 2009, 08:33:18 AM »
I would just like to post some impressions on my recent trip to Austria, where I participated in the Haydn commemorations for the 200th anniversary of his death...

But for me the star of the performance was Quasthoff. I had never listened to him live, and I can just say I will not forget his magnificent performance; he was as solid in the high register as in the low one, and every line was sung with the most excellent taste and with the most splendorous beauty of tone and powerful expression.

Gabriel, thank you for the great write-up of your trip.  And Quasthoff is amazing, isn't he!  Great that you got to hear him, and even nicer that you got to meet him.  IMHO he is one of the great singers on the scene today, and generally gives performances that linger in the memory for long after. 

Loved the "Moon River" anecdote, priceless. 

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Gabriel

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #526 on: June 05, 2009, 02:30:25 PM »
Gabriel, thank you for the great write-up of your trip.  And Quasthoff is amazing, isn't he!  Great that you got to hear him, and even nicer that you got to meet him.  IMHO he is one of the great singers on the scene today, and generally gives performances that linger in the memory for long after. 

Loved the "Moon River" anecdote, priceless. 

--Bruce

Bruce, I have your same "humble opinion" about Quasthoff: a great artist and a great man.

Thanks so much for your kind comments about my impressions. :)

Offline Mozart

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #527 on: June 08, 2009, 03:24:01 PM »
I have been waiting for the appearance of one of my very favorite composers here, but since he is shy as well as lovable, I guess I will have to bring him into the Corner on my own, with an able assist from Dave, who originally posted this bio in the old Forum.

Antonio Rosetti (1746-1792), a.k.a. František Antonín Rössler (or confusingly by other names) was born in Bohemia of Czech origin, but chose to Italianize his name (leading to further confusion with other musicians).  He received his education in Prague and at a Jesuit college in central Bohemia, where he studied theology (intending to be a priest) and music, but in the early 1770s decided to pick music as his avocation.  Rosetti was a double bass player and a member of the Prince Ernst orchestra, of which he became director in 1785.  The Prince's orchestra had a fine group of wind players and musical events at the chateau occurred weekly, so a large part of Rosetti's compositional oeuvre comprises works of chamber music.

In 1781, he visited Paris, where his music was warmly received, an event repeated in other European cities.  Rosetti became orchestral conductor of the Duke of Mecklenburg-Schwerin in 1789 at the peak of his reputation; symphonies and vocal works were commissioned further enhancing his reputation.  During that time, he was also summoned to the court of King Frederick William III of Berlin to present his Oratorio Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane.  However, Rosetti, who suffered from poor health most of his life, became seriously ill. and died in June of 1792 and was buried at Ludwigslust (debate exists about his age claiming his year of birth to be ca. 1750).

Rosetti's musical influences were primarily late Baroque-early Classic with Haydn having a major impact on his compositional direction.  In addition, his writing for smaller groups, especially wind instruments, was governed by his contact with the wind players in the ochestras of which he directed or was a member.  A partial listing of his works (comprising 400 or so) include 44 Symphonies, 4 keyboard concerti, 6 violin concerti, 1 viola concerto, 12 flute concerti, 7 oboe concerti, 4 clarinet concerti, 5 bassoon concerti, 17 horn concerti, 6 double horn concerti, 5 sinfonia concertantes, 38 partitas/serenades, 12 string quartets, 11 keyboard sonatas, 13 keyboard trios, 13 masses, 4 requiems, 22 other church works and 82 lieder reference here).


I wish I could say I have more of his music, since much of it has finally come available over the last 10 years, but I do have 10 or so disks which I am quite fond of. He is the quintessential Classical composer, writing in all genres as noted above, and particularly composing very fine wind music. Maybe someone will post some disks of interest, and I certainly will do so soon. :)

8)

PS - This one below is particularly choice! ;)
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Listening to:
Concerto Köln - Rosetti Mur A27 Sinfonia  in Eb 4th mvmt - Finale: Allegretto

I caught a piano concerto of his on youtube, it was delicious! I never heard of this guy before.
"I am the musical tree, eat of my fruit and your spirit shall rejoiceth!"
- Amadeus 6:26

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #528 on: June 08, 2009, 03:55:20 PM »
I caught a piano concerto of his on youtube, it was delicious! I never heard of this guy before.

Really. I need to dig that up. I have never heard any piano music by him, concerto or sonata (or in between). Thanks for mentioning it, I'll go look. :)

8)

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Listening to:
Zukerman Nat. Arts Center Orch / Zukerman - FJH Concerto #1 in C for Violin Hob VIIa 1 1st mvmt
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Offline Mozart

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #529 on: June 08, 2009, 04:23:07 PM »
I think you are in for a surprise! It certainly took me that way. Here is a taste.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/-EGcPb9sWww&amp;feature=PlayList&amp;p=30D65B6654A16A9A&amp;index=0" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/-EGcPb9sWww&amp;feature=PlayList&amp;p=30D65B6654A16A9A&amp;index=0</a>
"I am the musical tree, eat of my fruit and your spirit shall rejoiceth!"
- Amadeus 6:26

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #530 on: June 08, 2009, 04:38:12 PM »
I think you are in for a surprise! It certainly took me that way. Here is a taste.


Hey, that was good!  Very much Viennese High Classical style. And as you would expect, he features the horns in the tutti quite prominently. Nice, thanks!  :)

8)

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Zurich CO / Griffiths - Cherubini Overture from Lodoïska 1791
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Offline Mozart

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #531 on: June 08, 2009, 04:43:23 PM »
Hey, that was good!  Very much Viennese High Classical style. And as you would expect, he features the horns in the tutti quite prominently. Nice, thanks!  :)

8)

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Listening to:
Zurich CO / Griffiths - Cherubini Overture from Lodoïska 1791
Interestingly he wrote 4 horn concertos as well, which I am listening to now, and they remind me of someone's I just can't remember who...  ;D

I wonder who wrote them first, as they really sound so similar to Mozart's!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/LgXSooIs9pI&amp;feature=PlayList&amp;p=092B7E620499A0BF&amp;index=11" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/LgXSooIs9pI&amp;feature=PlayList&amp;p=092B7E620499A0BF&amp;index=11</a>
« Last Edit: June 08, 2009, 04:47:31 PM by Mozart »
"I am the musical tree, eat of my fruit and your spirit shall rejoiceth!"
- Amadeus 6:26

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #532 on: June 08, 2009, 04:49:53 PM »
Interestingly he wrote 4 horn concertos as well, which I am listening to now, and they remind me of someone's I just can't remember who...  ;D

I wonder who wrote them first, as they really sound so similar to Mozart's!

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/LgXSooIs9pI&amp;feature=PlayList&amp;p=092B7E620499A0BF&amp;index=11" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/LgXSooIs9pI&amp;feature=PlayList&amp;p=092B7E620499A0BF&amp;index=11</a>

Oh, he wrote more than 4, he wrote 17 for 1 horn and 6 for 2 horns (that survive today). I have one disk of them too, which I quite enjoy. Somehow it seems unusual to me that he was a double bassist (and cellist, I read somewhere), yet he made his reputation composing for winds. Rather like Danzi, who I believe was a violinist, but who is remembered today as a great composer for flute particularly and also oboe and bassoon. men of many parts. :)

Since Mozart's horn concerti were from rather late in his career, and they died at almost the same time, I would guess that Rosetti wrote his earlier. Maybe not though, just speculating. I haven't seen any sort of chronology on Rosetti's music. :)

8)

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Zurich CO / Griffiths - Cherubini Symphony in D 1815 1st mvmt
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Offline Mozart

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #533 on: June 08, 2009, 04:53:24 PM »
Who was the first to use the tittle romanze in a movement? He uses it in one of the horn concertos also. I am beginning to wonder which dusty shelf this guy out of! I've lived everything I have heard so far.
"I am the musical tree, eat of my fruit and your spirit shall rejoiceth!"
- Amadeus 6:26

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #534 on: June 08, 2009, 04:58:25 PM »
Who was the first to use the tittle romanze in a movement? He uses it in one of the horn concertos also. I am beginning to wonder which dusty shelf this guy out of! I've lived everything I have heard so far.

Oh, that was used at least back in the 1760's in Germany, but probably farther back still in France. But as for Rosetti, he has been kept a secret for some reason that I can't quite figure. I've enjoyed all his music right from the first symphony I heard. You should see if they have any wind partitas on there to listen to. They are very nice indeed! :)

8)

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Zurich CO / Griffiths - Cherubini Symphony in D 1815 1st mvmt
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Offline Mozart

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #535 on: June 10, 2009, 07:48:37 AM »


I am taking a this, and have to say its great! It's humorous music stuff.
"I am the musical tree, eat of my fruit and your spirit shall rejoiceth!"
- Amadeus 6:26

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #536 on: June 10, 2009, 04:10:48 PM »
Gurn & Mozart - just have been reading your numerous exchanges on Rosetti - I have about 10 discs of this composer's music, mainly 'wind compositions' of various types, including one CD of horn pieces (shown below) - looks like that there are plenty of other areas of his work to explore - thanks for refreshing my memory of this composer - will put on my own discs soon!  Dave  :D



Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #537 on: June 10, 2009, 04:19:22 PM »
Gurn & Mozart - just have been reading your numerous exchanges on Rosetti - I have about 10 discs of this composer's music, mainly 'wind compositions' of various types, including one CD of horn pieces (shown below) - looks like that there are plenty of other areas of his work to explore - thanks for refreshing my memory of this composer - will put on my own discs soon!  Dave  :D




Dave,
Yes, I always like to be reminded of Rosetti, because then I play some of his music, to my great enjoyment. :)  Since that discussion the other night, I have been hunting around to see if any of his keyboard sonatas have ever been recorded, but nothing in North America, nor at JPC nor Crochet, so my guess is that they are still virgins in this regard. Unless someone has any info... :-\

CPO has always done Rosetti proud, although my favorite recordings of his symphonies have always been Concerto Köln on Teldec.... :)

8)

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Listening to:
Hübner / Lüthy / Eaton / Latzko - Krommer Op 46 #1 Quartet in Bb for Bassoon & Strings 1st mvmt - Allegro
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Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #538 on: June 10, 2009, 04:47:18 PM »


I am taking a this, and have to say its great! It's humorous music stuff.

Franz Hoffmeister (1754-1812) - a Mozart contemporary, but lived longer! Just have two CDs of this composer, both of which I enjoy and shown below:

Wind Serenades, Vol. 2 w/ Consortium Classicum (with the wonderful Dieter Klocker on clarinet!) - other instruments include clarinet, horns, bassoons, & double bass; recorded beautifully on the CPO label.

Clarinet Quartets w/ Klocker again + Vlach Quartet Prague (2 violins + cello); again CPO label.

Now, how is the Clarinet & Piano disc? May add to my 'to buy' list if good!  ;D

 

Offline Mozart

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Re: Gurn's Classical Corner
« Reply #539 on: June 11, 2009, 06:57:20 AM »
Franz Hoffmeister (1754-1812) - a Mozart contemporary, but lived longer! Just have two CDs of this composer, both of which I enjoy and shown below:

Wind Serenades, Vol. 2 w/ Consortium Classicum (with the wonderful Dieter Klocker on clarinet!) - other instruments include clarinet, horns, bassoons, & double bass; recorded beautifully on the CPO label.

Clarinet Quartets w/ Klocker again + Vlach Quartet Prague (2 violins + cello); again CPO label.

Now, how is the Clarinet & Piano disc? May add to my 'to buy' list if good!  ;D

 

It is very...witty music, is it a good adjective? Very enjoyable, I imagine babies laughing to it.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/iii8J6u0w0s" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/iii8J6u0w0s</a>


I heard some string quartets by Rosetti and they put me to sleep :/
"I am the musical tree, eat of my fruit and your spirit shall rejoiceth!"
- Amadeus 6:26

 

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