Author Topic: New Releases  (Read 1417961 times)

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Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8640 on: April 23, 2019, 10:39:35 AM »
I was looking forward to experiencing the transition into 41 but I didn't get that far.

I experienced the transition just now, in my imagination. I think putting the three symphonies together adds nothing.

Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8641 on: April 23, 2019, 10:43:33 AM »
I grew up "imprinted" on my dad's Philips recording of Gardiner and the English Baroque doing Mozart 40:
6:54
13:53
4:58
9:09

The 41 on the same disc has three movements that reach 11 minutes.

Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8642 on: April 23, 2019, 10:51:40 AM »
JUNE!!!! PART 1!!!!



D. 959, 547, 915



D. 575, 537, 664




Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8643 on: April 23, 2019, 11:28:39 AM »
What is the Trio Zimmerman?

Offline North Star

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8644 on: April 23, 2019, 11:42:56 AM »
What is the Trio Zimmerman?
Frank Peter Zimmermann, Antoine Tamestit and Christian Poltéra. The string trio arrangement by Dmitry Sitkovetsky has been recorded several times before.
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Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8645 on: April 23, 2019, 12:28:18 PM »
Frank Peter Zimmermann, Antoine Tamestit and Christian Poltéra. The string trio arrangement by Dmitry Sitkovetsky has been recorded several times before.

Sound like a good ensemble, but I think I have two recordings of that arrangement already.

Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8646 on: April 23, 2019, 12:39:33 PM »
TZ is really excellent (as you'd expect from three star soloists joining forces) but I'm not into the Bach. Heresy, right?! I dig TZ's Mozart Divertimento.

JUNE!!!! PART TWO!!!!



Copland 3 / Chavez 2



Pop-top space-saver box with 42 page booklet and suspiciously non-rainy pictures of Norwegian fjords on every CD sleeve. Should sell for $50-60.



D. 575, 850, 566, 845







Ewa Poblocka does Schubert and Chopin miniatures
Alexei Lubimov does Dussek's Farewell Sonata on an 1815 Brodmann and two Debussy preludes on a modern Steinway
Tobias Koch does a bunch of Chopin on 1840s pianos
Elizabeth Brauss does Chopin Scherzo No. 2 on an 1847 Pleyel
Francois-Xavier Poizat does Liszt on an 1870s Steinway
and more

Offline Madiel

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8647 on: April 23, 2019, 12:46:23 PM »
But this is how CDs have worked since they were invented. If you don't press pause on the remote, they move right along from one symphony to the next...

This is what track programming is for.

It’s sad how many CD players don’t actually have it.
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Offline Madiel

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8648 on: April 23, 2019, 12:49:57 PM »
Also, June looks exceptionally interesting.

I will no doubt forget all this.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8649 on: April 23, 2019, 01:20:37 PM »
I grew up "imprinted" on my dad's Philips recording of Gardiner and the English Baroque doing Mozart 40:
6:54
13:53
4:58
9:09

The 41 on the same disc has three movements that reach 11 minutes.

Just when I deleted that one from my shopping cart...

Offline Brian

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8650 on: April 23, 2019, 01:36:31 PM »
Just when I deleted that one from my shopping cart...
Kid me went out and bought the Böhm late symphony twofer and was like "but the symphonies are so short!!!!!"

Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8651 on: April 23, 2019, 01:38:34 PM »
Kid me went out and bought the Böhm late symphony twofer and was like "but the symphonies are so short!!!!!"

With Bohm tempos, not that much shorter, I suspect.

I kick myself because I recently got a box of Bruggen/Mozart/Philips and now realize the Gardiner/Mozart/Philips is approximately a zillion times better.

PerfectWagnerite

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8652 on: April 23, 2019, 02:48:43 PM »
I listened to it this afternoon by coincidence, the whole symphony. I didn't enjoy it I'm afraid, but not necessarily because it was too long,

I was looking forward to experiencing the transition into 41 but I didn't get that far.
Harnoncourt is a frustrating conductor, the best I can describe is the soft parts are too loud and the loud parts are too soft. Throw in a few weird accents and errand tempi and there you have the garden-variety Harnoncourt performance.

I don't see any transition to 41 either. Just because the final trio of symphonies were written more or less as a group doesn't mean there is any connection between them.

Kid me went out and bought the Böhm late symphony twofer and was like "but the symphonies are so short!!!!!"
Bohm, Szell, Walter etc. omit the exposition repeats in the 1st, 2nd and 4th mvts of no. 40. The 4th mvt is around 5 minutes in these performances and the 2nd mvt is 8-9 minutes. I really don't understand the performance practice nowadays to repeat not only the exposition but also the development and recapitulation which stretches the final mvt to 10 minutes long. I am not dyslexic I heard it the first time around.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 02:50:45 PM by PerfectWagnerite »

Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8653 on: April 23, 2019, 02:57:08 PM »
Harnoncourt is a frustrating conductor the greatest Mozart conductor who ever lived...

I made a slight revision to your statement to reflect my own opinion.  0:)

Offline Que

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8654 on: April 23, 2019, 09:16:18 PM »
Harnoncourt is a frustrating conductor, the best I can describe is the soft parts are too loud and the loud parts are too soft. Throw in a few weird accents and errand tempi and there you have the garden-variety Harnoncourt performance.

I made a slight revision to your statement to reflect my own opinion.  0:)

I'm torn between both sentiments. Harnoncourt's style certainly became more erratic as time progressed.
Tough I prefer period instruments, I like his Concertgebouw recordings much better than his later recordings with the Concentus Wien.

Top Mozart conductors? Harnoncourt is definitely one of them, together with Szell, Walter, Krips, Brüggen, Jacobs and Van Immerseel.

Q

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8655 on: April 23, 2019, 09:38:48 PM »
I'm torn between both sentiments. Harnoncourt's style certainly became more erratic as time progressed.
Tough I prefer period instruments, I like his Concertgebouw recordings much better than his later recordings with the Concentus Wien.

Top Mozart conductors? Harnoncourt is definitely one of them, together with Szell, Walter, Krips, Brüggen, Jacobs and Van Immerseel.

Q
I'd go for Mackerras or Colin Davis myself. But any decent conductor is able to achieve greatness with Mozart. I mean, the source material....
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8656 on: April 23, 2019, 09:46:06 PM »
But any decent conductor is able to achieve greatness with Mozart.

I don’t agree with this, unless you make it circular with the meaning you give to decent. In my opinion the last few symphonies aren’t easy to get off the page.

By the way, yesterday I listened to Harnoncourt’s final 40 and the 40 from Mathieu Herzog and Norrington Stuttgart 40. 
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 09:50:54 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mandryka

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8657 on: April 23, 2019, 09:55:39 PM »
erratic

Q

The image of erratic is that of deviating from the orthodox, and right from the start Harnoncourt was clear that this is what he wanted to do in Mozart and elsewhere. However he didn’t always have the bottle, or maybe the clout, to get the orchestra to follow.

I think that where you have a musician who is constantly curious, constantly experimenting, there are bound to be disorienting results, and the joy of listening is to follow the path as it were, to explore the journey with the conductor. So I’m very glad to have Harnoncourt’s last Mozart recordings.

Basically this is a plea for less judgement, less evaluation, and more understanding.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2019, 09:57:59 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Wanderer

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8658 on: April 24, 2019, 12:11:31 AM »
JUNE!!!! PART 1!!!!


D. 959, 547, 915



D. 575, 537, 664



Interesting. And more Skalkottas is always a good thing.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: New Releases
« Reply #8659 on: April 24, 2019, 06:58:51 AM »
These two recordings and box set are of very high interest to me (even though I own so many performances of these works already):

"Music must be beautiful or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů