Author Topic: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)  (Read 255980 times)

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Baron Scarpia

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Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
« Reply #1720 on: June 09, 2018, 05:58:30 AM »
I can't comment on its use and abuse so much as what I think it denotes... which is a no-fingerprints, hands-off approach to the music... often also associated with a kind of background (rising through the ranks, instrument--co-repetitor--assistant--operetta/opera-house experience--conductor--music-director). Masur, I think, would qualify... Blomstedt, too, and especially Sawallisch. But you are right, there is no clear delineation and only because they may fit that term, there's no saying that their interpretations would also or necessarily be more similar than disparate.

Isn't that a perfect description of Karajan (who I've never heard described as a kapellmeister). You hear the odd story of someone who substitutes for someone with no notice and is recognized as a prodigious talent (Toscanini) but this is the rare exception, no?

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827)
« Reply #1721 on: June 09, 2018, 07:17:23 AM »
Isn't that a perfect description of Karajan (who I've never heard described as a kapellmeister). You hear the odd story of someone who substitutes for someone with no notice and is recognized as a prodigious talent (Toscanini) but this is the rare exception, no?

It is. Or Thielemann. Neither would be considered "Kapellmeister", though, on account of the force of their personality. But both really knew how to do it (whatever one may say about Karajan, he sure knew the trade and wasn't a faker) from the ground up... but both super-added something, didn't they?!