Author Topic: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990  (Read 9683 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #60 on: September 14, 2010, 02:05:33 PM »
I was delighted to receive my Bernstein 'Original Jacket Collection' box set today. It is a great nostalgia trip for those who collected in the days of LP as all the CDs are contained in miniature versions of the original LP sleeve. I show the Jeremiah sleeve below - my favourite from the set. Of course they've tampered with the lettering on the front as the original coupling was not 'The Age of Anxiety' but Roy Harris' Symphony No 3 (also the best performance of this work). I played the Jeremiah Symphony today - by far the best performance of this work ever committed to disc (and I have them all). Also in this pressing there is a very LP like warmth and depth to the transfer and Jennie Tourel is the outstanding mezzo-soprano in this work. There is a nice booklet with detailed notes and lots of photos - I look forward to exploring the rest of the set.
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Offline Guido

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #61 on: September 14, 2010, 04:08:46 PM »

All a matter of your own opinion.

Well what else, but I trust myself to sense musical quality - this comes not just from experience, but also just from listening intently and being acutely aware of the music's means and effect.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #62 on: September 14, 2010, 06:13:20 PM »
Well what else, but I trust myself to sense musical quality - this comes not just from experience, but also just from listening intently and being acutely aware of the music's means and effect.

And I don't sense musical quality and my opinion doesn't come from experience? I've been a musician for 20 years. The bottomline is we both value different things in music. Perhaps I'm more open to Bernstein than you are? I like many of Bernstein's works, but not everything he composed.
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Offline Guido

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #63 on: September 15, 2010, 12:45:38 AM »
You were telling me that my opinions were opinions, which I already knew, but I was telling you why that did not lessen their value. That's all!  :)

Quote
I like many of Bernstein's works, but not everything he composed.

I feel exactly the same. I have endeavored to hear everything in his output, because I really love the pieces that I do like, so I think I am as open as I can be to his music...
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Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #64 on: September 15, 2010, 12:52:24 AM »
I was delighted to receive my Bernstein 'Original Jacket Collection' box set today. It is a great nostalgia trip for those who collected in the days of LP as all the CDs are contained in miniature versions of the original LP sleeve. I show the Jeremiah sleeve below - my favourite from the set. Of course they've tampered with the lettering on the front as the original coupling was not 'The Age of Anxiety' but Roy Harris' Symphony No 3 (also the best performance of this work).

Then this is not really original, is it? The concept and the result seem a bit forced. Are they all like this or are most of them truly original (without additions)?
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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #65 on: December 18, 2010, 10:26:43 AM »
Got a pair of free tickets and attended a performance of Bernstein's Candide at the Harman Theater in Washington D.C.  I don't know how this work would be categorized, somewhere between a Broadway show and an operetta.  There was some good music along the way, but way, way too long.  Overall I'd put it somewhere between boring and insufferable. 

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #66 on: December 19, 2010, 06:15:43 AM »
Then this is not really original, is it? The concept and the result seem a bit forced. Are they all like this or are most of them truly original (without additions)?

Not entirely sure as I don't have many of the LPs, but I guess that they have combined two LPs on to one CD - as you can get more on. Personally I like the original sleeve designs even though there may be more on the CD than on the original LP.
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Offline just Jeff

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #67 on: December 21, 2010, 05:56:15 PM »
Not entirely sure as I don't have many of the LPs, but I guess that they have combined two LPs on to one CD - as you can get more on. Personally I like the original sleeve designs even though there may be more on the CD than on the original LP.

Is Roy Harris' Symphony No 3 on the new combined disc, I don't notice it on the cover you've shown?  But I see you said it was on the original LP issue of this title.
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Offline Daverz

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #68 on: December 21, 2010, 06:30:29 PM »
Got a pair of free tickets and attended a performance of Bernstein's Candide at the Harman Theater in Washington D.C.  I don't know how this work would be categorized, somewhere between a Broadway show and an operetta.  There was some good music along the way, but way, way too long.  Overall I'd put it somewhere between boring and insufferable.

That's too bad.  I'm only familiar with the original Broadway cast CD (not Bernstein's DG set), which is one of my favorite CDs of anything, but that's only about 50 minutes of music.


Scarpia

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #69 on: December 21, 2010, 07:15:46 PM »
That's too bad.  I'm only familiar with the original Broadway cast CD (not Bernstein's DG set), which is one of my favorite CDs of anything, but that's only about 50 minutes of music.



There probably was 50 good minutes in it, out of three hours.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #70 on: December 24, 2010, 03:25:46 AM »
Is Roy Harris' Symphony No 3 on the new combined disc, I don't notice it on the cover you've shown?  But I see you said it was on the original LP issue of this title.

Unfortunately not as it's an all Bernstein box - the LP cover picture is the same but the Age of Anxiety has replaced the Roy Harris - I'd rather have the Harris, but that is available on an excellent Sony CD with David Diamond's 4th Symphony and Randall Thompson's 2nd - all great works.
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Online Brian

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #71 on: January 14, 2011, 02:34:36 PM »
I've just listened to Bernstein's clarinet sonata for the first time. It was written while he was still studying under Koussevitsky at Tanglewood in 1941-42, and I couldn't help hearing in the first movement a seemingly direct quotation of one of the works Koussevitsky championed most: Sibelius' Seventh. Does anyone with knowledge of the score or of Bernstein's career know anything about this? In particular, is there any evidence it's an intentional allusion, or is it just a coincidental similarity?

Elnimio

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #72 on: January 14, 2011, 05:15:33 PM »
Prelude Fugue and Riffs = the best

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #73 on: January 15, 2011, 07:55:40 AM »
Good to see Bernstein's music get some love. So often he's overlooked as a composer of serious music. There's much more to him than West Side Story.
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Offline Musician

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #74 on: April 24, 2011, 02:00:55 PM »
I love him as a composer, conductor and musician, although his conducting mannerisms are a little flamboyant but that is what makes him a character.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #75 on: April 24, 2011, 02:52:59 PM »
I love him as a composer, conductor and musician, although his conducting mannerisms are a little flamboyant but that is what makes him a character.

Actually, there is already a Bernstein thread started if you want to check it out: http://www.good-music-guide.com/community/index.php/topic,12455.msg307396.html#msg307396
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karlhenning

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #76 on: April 25, 2011, 05:05:52 AM »
Thread merge ahead (with Bernstein spelled correctly, I suspect).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #77 on: May 24, 2011, 02:57:05 PM »
Listened to On The Waterfront just awhile ago (w/ Mata/Dallas Symphony on Dorian) and I had forgotten just how awesome this piece work was. Man, I'm loving this.

I'm no stranger to Bernstein's music, of course, but it's quite refreshing to go back and hear something you haven't heard in awhile and be overwhelmed by its exuberance and power.
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klingsor

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #78 on: May 25, 2011, 04:07:32 AM »
Listened to On The Waterfront just awhile ago (w/ Mata/Dallas Symphony on Dorian) and I had forgotten just how awesome this piece work was. Man, I'm loving this.

I'm no stranger to Bernstein's music, of course, but it's quite refreshing to go back and hear something you haven't heard in awhile and be overwhelmed by its exuberance and power.

Agree that On the Waterfront is an awesome work. It's so disappointing to think he never wrote any more film music. I'm a longtime fan of Bernstein the conductor and composer. His first recording of the Copland Sym 3 is a masterful achievement, imho.
Pretty much agree with some of you about his own symphonies: Jeremiah is the best, with Age of Anxiety a close second (for me). Prelude, Fugue & Riffs is great, also the serenade and clarinet sonata. His piano Anniversaries are quite nice as well. I never heard the entire Mass, only the interludes which are excellent. To me, West Side Story is the great masterpiece of Bernstein. Candide has inspiration on nearly the same level, but as a dramatic work it falters. That famous highlights LP on Sony is a good way to go. However, the complete recording issued on New World is very good:


The complete recording he made for DG is to be avoided, although it's worth hearing once for the odd tempo (and singer!) choices.  :o

Offline jlaurson

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Re: Leonard Bernstein 1918-1990
« Reply #79 on: June 01, 2011, 04:58:44 AM »
« Last Edit: June 01, 2011, 05:00:15 AM by jlaurson »

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