Author Topic: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)  (Read 16313 times)

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Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #100 on: November 04, 2017, 06:42:11 PM »


Listening to the two string quartets from this disc. How is it possible that these works are not more known? This music blowed me away!! Two consistent, energic, melodious, passionate quartets that can't disappoint. The first one reminded me of Moeran, and the second one has a touch a la Shostakovich, being a little cruder than the first one. Overall, magnificent stuff.
« Last Edit: November 04, 2017, 09:46:39 PM by SymphonicAddict »

Online vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #101 on: November 04, 2017, 11:00:44 PM »


Listening to the two string quartets from this disc. How is it possible that these works are not more known? This music blowed me away!! Two consistent, energic, melodious, passionate quartets that can't disappoint. The first one reminded me of Moeran, and the second one has a touch a la Shostakovich, being a little cruder than the first one. Overall, magnificent stuff.
I couldn't agree with you more Caesar!
I've just been listening to this new release. I've hardly gone beyond the First Quartet which I keep replaying - it is a wonderfully lyrical and in places moving work. I think that your Moeran analogy is spot on. I've felt for many years that Kabalevsky was rather underrated. Works like the Cello Concerto 2 have great depth and Symphony No.4 is one of my favourites too along with Symphony 1 and Piano Concerto 1.

« Last Edit: November 04, 2017, 11:09:26 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #102 on: November 05, 2017, 12:13:31 PM »
I couldn't agree with you more Caesar!
I've just been listening to this new release. I've hardly gone beyond the First Quartet which I keep replaying - it is a wonderfully lyrical and in places moving work. I think that your Moeran analogy is spot on. I've felt for many years that Kabalevsky was rather underrated. Works like the Cello Concerto 2 have great depth and Symphony No.4 is one of my favourites too along with Symphony 1 and Piano Concerto 1.



Indeed, Jeffrey! Kabalevsky deserves much more attention. The first quartet is really lyrical, as you say, and very moving in some fragments. The 2nd quartet is just as good as the first one, perhaps a little bit better.

I'm very fond of his 4 symphonies. I think all of them are exceptional, very convincing. The cello concerto 2 is quite powerful, a work that shows aspects of turbulent times.

Online vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #103 on: November 05, 2017, 12:52:57 PM »
Indeed, Jeffrey! Kabalevsky deserves much more attention. The first quartet is really lyrical, as you say, and very moving in some fragments. The 2nd quartet is just as good as the first one, perhaps a little bit better.

I'm very fond of his 4 symphonies. I think all of them are exceptional, very convincing. The cello concerto 2 is quite powerful, a work that shows aspects of turbulent times.
Do you know the wonderful performance of Cello Concerto No.2 Caesar with Kabalevsky conducting and Daniel Shafran playing the cello? I think that it is in a class of its own and deeply moving. The Symphony 1 shows the influence of his teacher Miaskovsky - a fine work and I'm delighted that there are now two recordings of the powerful Symphony 4.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline kyjo

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #104 on: November 05, 2017, 01:31:56 PM »
Kabalevsky's Colas Breugnon overture is one of the most inspiriting pieces of music I know - it's all great fun but the darker middle section contains a surprising amount of depth. It's rather like a Soviet cousin to Bernstein's overture to Candide.

Amongst his other works, the Cello Concerto no. 2 has been a great recent discovery of mine - it deserves to be counted among the greatest 20th century cello concertos. I also find the slow movement of his Cello Concerto no. 1 to be quite moving (the outer movements are comparatively inconsequential IMO). I must explore the rest of his output. I sampled his PC no. 2 which appealed greatly to me.

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #105 on: November 05, 2017, 02:09:55 PM »
Do you know the wonderful performance of Cello Concerto No.2 Caesar with Kabalevsky conducting and Daniel Shafran playing the cello? I think that it is in a class of its own and deeply moving. The Symphony 1 shows the influence of his teacher Miaskovsky - a fine work and I'm delighted that there are now two recordings of the powerful Symphony 4.

Unfortunately, I don't know that recording. I suppose it has to be a very significant performance, being conducted by the composer himself. I have this recording, which is very fine as well:


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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #106 on: November 05, 2017, 02:11:32 PM »
Kabalevsky's Colas Breugnon overture is one of the most inspiriting pieces of music I know - it's all great fun but the darker middle section contains a surprising amount of depth. It's rather like a Soviet cousin to Bernstein's overture to Candide.

Amongst his other works, the Cello Concerto no. 2 has been a great recent discovery of mine - it deserves to be counted among the greatest 20th century cello concertos. I also find the slow movement of his Cello Concerto no. 1 to be quite moving (the outer movements are comparatively inconsequential IMO). I must explore the rest of his output. I sampled his PC no. 2 which appealed greatly to me.
Try PC No.1 Kyle as well - I really enjoy the work which is catchy and memorable but also has a slow movement of considerable depth.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline kyjo

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #107 on: November 05, 2017, 09:37:52 PM »
Try PC No.1 Kyle as well - I really enjoy the work which is catchy and memorable but also has a slow movement of considerable depth.

Will do, Jeffrey. :)

Online vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri Kabalevsky (1904-1987)
« Reply #108 on: November 06, 2017, 02:46:33 AM »
Unfortunately, I don't know that recording. I suppose it has to be a very significant performance, being conducted by the composer himself. I have this recording, which is very fine as well:


Indeed - a great disc Caesar but do look out for the Kabalevsky/Shafran recording.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

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