Author Topic: Antonio Casimir Cartellieri (1772-1807)  (Read 5978 times)

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robnewman

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Antonio Casimir Cartellieri (1772-1807)
« on: May 31, 2009, 07:35:04 AM »
Antonio Casimir Cartellieri (1772-1807)

‘…..In fact, it was during the stay of Count Oborsky in Vienna that my father, Antonio Casimir Cartellieri,  studied the strict compositional style under Albrechtsberger’s direction and with strenuous diligence. It was here in Vienna he made the acquaintance of that unforgettable friend of music, (patron of Mozart and others), his Highness Prince Joseph Lobkowitz who first heard his music at an academy presented by Chorsky. He there conducted his extraordinary symphony in C Minor at this first public performance of his talents at the Lobkowitz Palace - a concert whose programme was shared by music from the recently arrived Ludwig van Beethoven in 1795. The amazed Prince immediately asked Oborsky for my father’s musical services. Oborsky was unhappy to lose him. It was thus that my father became music director of that  great patron of the arts in 1796. As is well known, the Lobkowitz court was the gathering place for all kinds of artists and it was there that Cartellieri made the acquaintence of all the famous composers and virtuosos and where his intellect found continual stimulation. The Prince at this time had operas performed in Vienna and also at  his estates in Bohemia and my father always had a very heavy workload. In 1803 he married my mother who bore him 3 sons, myself included. Cartellieri was often ill during his last years. His strenuous, restless work pace had ruined his health and a disharmony with one of his colleagues in Bohemia may have contributed its part. His wife and the Prince himself had been concerned about his life for some time. And, in 1807, while accompanying the Prince from his castle to the other his illness broke out with uncommon force. He had no strength left in him when he was taken to the nearest village under the Prince’s jurisdiction, about 4 miles from the castle. He longed for his wife, his mother who had been living with the family since his appointment, and for his children, who had been following in the count’s travelling party but, by the time they caught up he was already dead. He died on 2nd September 1807 at the age of 34. His widow today (1826) lives in Prague on a pension from the generous Prince’

(Short Handwritten Biography made in Vienna in 1826 by Josef Cartellieri, son of the above composer - previously unpublished and contained in notes to recently released recordings of Antonio Casimir Cartellieri’s concertos and chamber music).

Cartellieri's music, consisting of no less than 3 clarinet concertos, an early flute concerto, dozens of chamber works, several symphonies and several remarkable oratorios is only recently being 'rediscovered'. It's huge importance and the fact that it was of great importance to the young Beethoven (a man who was to become his little known musical friend) speaks for itself. The concert refered to above (1795) is remembered today chiefly for Beethoven. In fact it was Cartellieri who, by various accounts, was immensely applauded there and for months afterwards. Though it was to be Beethoven who, over the next years far surpassed his public success. The music of Cartellieri is often astonishing. Cartellieri's main role in preparing music for performance under Lobkowtiz (both in Vienna and in Bohemia), even for publication, effectively removed him from public appreciation.

Concerto in G Major
3rd Movement (Rondo)
c.1788

http://www.mediafire.com/?vznzct1htmm

also -

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_qmMGRan20




//
« Last Edit: May 31, 2009, 08:23:42 AM by robnewman »

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Antonio Casimir Cartellieri (1772-1807)
« Reply #1 on: May 31, 2009, 02:00:35 PM »
Well, Mr. Newman seems to be starting numerous threads on many of the more obscure composers of the classical into the early romantic periods; of course, nearly all of these composers have been discussed in the 'old' and the present forum, so nothing new or provocative here.  Also, many of these 'new' composer threads include just a link to an upload site (not sure about the legality of this approach, but if still copyrighted material, then be wary?).

I would first suggest that before starting a 'new' thread on an obscure composer that a 'search' first be performed - there may already be a decent discussion that can be 'renewed' and expanded.  Also, check out this LINK to the 'old' forum that was started by me - these links are still in operation and provide plenty of discussion & advice; e.g. checkout the Cartellieri link in the old forum (actually become by me!).

Finally for those who want to start a thread on a composer, please be informative and creative - at least give a little bio (which may include some more detailed links), reasons for posting, and possibly some CD recommendations that may be purchased and enjoyed by others.   :-\

robnewman

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Re: Antonio Casimir Cartellieri (1772-1807)
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2009, 02:42:08 AM »
Well, Mr. Newman seems to be starting numerous threads on many of the more obscure composers of the classical into the early romantic periods; of course, nearly all of these composers have been discussed in the 'old' and the present forum, so nothing new or provocative here.  Also, many of these 'new' composer threads include just a link to an upload site (not sure about the legality of this approach, but if still copyrighted material, then be wary?).

I would first suggest that before starting a 'new' thread on an obscure composer that a 'search' first be performed - there may already be a decent discussion that can be 'renewed' and expanded.  Also, check out this LINK to the 'old' forum that was started by me - these links are still in operation and provide plenty of discussion & advice; e.g. checkout the Cartellieri link in the old forum (actually become by me!).

Finally for those who want to start a thread on a composer, please be informative and creative - at least give a little bio (which may include some more detailed links), reasons for posting, and possibly some CD recommendations that may be purchased and enjoyed by others.   :-\

Thanks SonicMan,

A second reference to Cartellieri is not bad, as you say. And I happily share a track of his. More should know of him and his remarkable music, perhaps you agree ? As you say, the composers I share on here are mostly not well known at all but each, in their own way, had remarkable talents.

Regards




robnewman

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Re: Antonio Casimir Cartellieri (1772-1807)
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2009, 04:12:41 AM »
Antonio Casimir Cartellieri  (1772-1807)
Concerto for 2 Clarinets in B Flat Major
3rd Movement
Rondo Allegro
c.1794
MDG (2001)
Dieter Kloecker
Czech Philharmonic Chamber Orchestra

Recently rediscovered and recorded music by the hugely talented Antonio Casimir Cartellieri (1772-1807) a close working associate of Ludwig van Beethoven during his early years. Who exploded on to the Vienna music scene in 1795 at a highly acclaimed concert shared by the newly arrived Beethoven himself. Here is the third movement from the world premiere recording of his concerto for 2 Clarinets, the third of his clarinet concertos already written by that date. As you will hear, Cartellieri was to be a major formative influence on the music of the emerging Beethoven. But a composer who, for various reasons, was never given credit by the wider music public or even by writers on classical music beyond that date.

There can be little doubt the 3rd, ‘Eroica’,  Symphony of Beethoven was dedicated not to Napoleon Bonaparte (as is traditionally believed) but to his little known musical friend and colleague Cartellieri, that dedication first appearing the year after Cartellieri’s death in the first published London edition of that symphony. The association between these two men always close but unappreciated until recently and beginning with their musical meeting in Vienna under Prince Lobkowitz of 1795.

One of the major discoveries of recent years in the field of classical musical research.

http://www.mediafire.com/?krynkbjdy2i