Author Topic: Viva Vivaldi!  (Read 85624 times)

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Mark

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #20 on: June 03, 2007, 02:43:54 PM »
Yes, yes, YES! An absolute MUST! Makes the hairs on the back of my neck stand on end every time I hear Mullova strike those gut strings.

So as to illustrate the above point which I made earlier, listen to the attached. It's highly compressed to make it fit on this post, but imagine it with full dynamic range - it's a stunner! ;)

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #21 on: June 03, 2007, 02:56:44 PM »
Q - Vivaldi has always been a favorite of mine, so thanks for starting this thread - I've been collecting CDs on him since '84, and now have a couple of dozen (of course, could easily have twice that many!).  Biondi, Huggett, & Manze are the performers that I own in the many violin concertos - a number of these have already been shown & discussed.  But, I also like his wind works - below are a number that I've enjoyed over the years:

Flute Concertos w/ Janet See + McGegan w/ Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra
Concertos for Various Winds w/ Sarah Frances (oboe) + London Harpsichord Ensemble
Oboe Concertos w/ Heinz Holliger & I Musici - may be OOP, but love Holliger on the oboe!
Bassoon Concertos w/ Tamas Benkocs + Drahos - bunch of these volumes exist on Naxos
Bassoon  Concertos w/ Bernardini & Borras
 
   

 

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2007, 04:09:30 PM »
In a recent count, I came to the stunning realization that I now have over 250 different concertos by Vivaldi. And yes, they are all different  ::)

Performances:

All the Carmignola, Biondi, Manze, & Podger for starters. Then Ofra Harnoy "Complete Cello Concertos" and Op 14 Sonatas, Daniel Smith "Complete Bassoon Concertos", New Bach Collegium "Complete Oboe Concertos", and then a great number of others, like Parley of Instruments, King's Consort, Zefiro, Pinnock, I musici.

I had gotten a lot of these works originally in older style performances that were being rereleased on CD, but I have since upgraded/replaced nearly all of those since I have discovered not only the beauty of period instruments, but also that the performances are much less post-Romantic and decidedly livelier.

8)
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George

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2007, 04:37:16 PM »
All the Carmignola, Biondi, Manze, & Podger for starters.

That's what I'm talkin' about... 0:)


BorisG

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2007, 04:47:53 PM »
« Last Edit: June 03, 2007, 04:51:01 PM by BorisG »

Offline Que

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #25 on: June 05, 2007, 09:31:23 AM »
Great recordings! Some other favourite Biondi's:

 

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Bunny

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #26 on: June 05, 2007, 01:35:47 PM »
My favorite Biondi Vivaldi -- it reawakened my interest after years of overexposure to elevator style 4 seasons.   0:)



And some early efforts from Giuliano Carmignola.    8)


Offline FideLeo

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #27 on: June 05, 2007, 07:50:23 PM »

Bassoon  Concertos w/ Bernardini & Borras



I have had this one for a long time and the performances hold up very well indeed.  ;D
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Offline Tsearcher

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Vivaldi on Naive
« Reply #28 on: June 06, 2007, 06:47:37 PM »
How are the Naive series of Vivaldi recordings? They seem to be missing some important works right now but what about the playing quality? Thanks.

Offline Que

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #29 on: June 07, 2007, 09:42:18 AM »
Another favourite of mine. Not by an Italian ensemble, but the Freiburger Barockorchester under Gottfried von der Goltz sounds truly great. Not only does the name of these exciting Dresden concertos indicate a German flavour, they do actually sound like it - some with horns or trombones and all.
I have dubbed these "Vivaldi's Brandenburgs"  :)

Samples here! (try no. 4)



Q
« Last Edit: June 07, 2007, 09:52:16 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Bach Man

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Re: Vivaldi on Naive
« Reply #30 on: June 08, 2007, 07:57:37 PM »
The aim of the series is to record all the works that are housed in the National University library in Turin. They plan to release about fifty more recordings in this series so most of Vivaldi should be covered eventually. The playing is mostly excellent from what I've heard, HIP of course, and they use really first rate musicians throughout.

Heather Harrison

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Re: Vivaldi on Naive
« Reply #31 on: June 08, 2007, 08:06:45 PM »
I have a few of them so far, and I am sure I will get more.  The ones I have are all top quality, and they are mostly recordings of works that are seldom heard (many of which are world premiere recordings).  Vivaldi was very prolific, but I find the quality of his music to be consistently high, and these obscure works compare very favorably to the better-known ones.

Heather

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #32 on: June 08, 2007, 10:09:48 PM »
(try no. 4)

That snippet sounds a lot like JD Heinichen, a composer at the Dresden court.
The Dresden connections supposedly explain the presence of horns (and other
woodwinds) in this music? 
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Que

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #33 on: June 08, 2007, 10:23:56 PM »
That snippet sounds a lot like JD Heinichen, a composer at the Dresden court.
The Dresden connections supposedly explain the presence of horns (and other
woodwinds) in this music? 

Yes, indeed so.
It seems Vivaldi was very much played in Dresden, due to the presence there of Konzertmeister Johann Georg Pisendel, who was a pupil of Vivaldi. The library of the "Hofkapelle" contained a number of manuscripsts, of which two explicitly refer to Dresden. On the CD are these and three others with similar orchestral scoring for solo violon, pairs of oboes and horns, and bassoon.

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #34 on: June 08, 2007, 10:48:27 PM »
Yes, indeed so.
It seems Vivaldi was very much played in Dresden, due to the presence there of Konzertmeister Johann Georg Pisendel, who was a pupil of Vivaldi. The library of the "Hofkapelle" contained a number of manuscripsts, of which two explicitly refer to Dresden. On the CD are these and three others with similar orchestral scoring for solo violon, pairs of oboes and horns, and bassoon.

Q

Ah I did overlook the Pisendal bit - von der Goltz and his group made a very good recording of Pisendal and Zelenka orchestral works for DHM supposedly to explore this history as well. 
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #35 on: June 09, 2007, 01:14:26 PM »
Yes, indeed so.
It seems Vivaldi was very much played in Dresden, due to the presence there of Konzertmeister Johann Georg Pisendel, who was a pupil of Vivaldi. The library of the "Hofkapelle" contained a number of manuscripsts, of which two explicitly refer to Dresden. On the CD are these and three others with similar orchestral scoring for solo violon, pairs of oboes and horns, and bassoon.

Q

RV 574 is indeed one of the very few instances of Vivaldi using horns in the concertino. My guess is that he didn't have any hornists available, which is fairly amazing considering the diverse and talented corps of performers he did have! When I first read your post, I thought your were saying that the horns, winds &c were in the ritornello, which would have been quite extraordinary, and doubtless a product of local rescoring, since all of Vivaldi's ritornellos are exclusively strings, except what might have crept into the continuuo (no rules there). That looks like an interesting disk. I see that it is not available over here at the moment... :-\  (although I have all those works by others, still... :)  )

8)
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Offline Que

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #36 on: June 09, 2007, 01:44:24 PM »
RV 574 is indeed one of the very few instances of Vivaldi using horns in the concertino. My guess is that he didn't have any hornists available, which is fairly amazing considering the diverse and talented corps of performers he did have! When I first read your post, I thought your were saying that the horns, winds &c were in the ritornello, which would have been quite extraordinary, and doubtless a product of local rescoring, since all of Vivaldi's ritornellos are exclusively strings, except what might have crept into the continuuo (no rules there). That looks like an interesting disk. I see that it is not available over here at the moment... :-\  (although I have all those works by others, still... :)  )

8)

Uhmm, you got me there Gurn, I'm not at home in the technical terms!  :-[
The extra info I can give you is that the concertos RV 574 and RV 569 are played with two horns (corni), RV 576 & RV 577 just with woodwinds (pairs of flutes & oboes) and RV 192 with strings (and b.c.).

And it is fortunately available in the US!  :)
Check Amazon & CDconnection.

Q
« Last Edit: June 09, 2007, 01:46:34 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #37 on: June 09, 2007, 02:06:49 PM »
Uhmm, you got me there Gurn, I'm not at home in the technical terms!  :-[
The extra info I can give you is that the concertos RV 574 and RV 569 are played with two horns (corni), RV 576 & RV 577 just with woodwinds (pairs of flutes & oboes) and RV 192 with strings (and b.c.).

And it is fortunately available in the US!  :)
Check Amazon & CDconnection.

Q


Oh, not technical at all. Concertino = soloists, ritornello = orchestra. Somewhere in your OP you mentioned horns or trombones or woodwinds in the orchestra, and fooled me. :D 

You're right, I see now. When I searched Amazon, I use "Dresden" as a search term rather than "Dresda" so of course I got nothing on it. My bad. :-\  Thanks for the link.  :)

8)
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Offline Que

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #38 on: June 10, 2007, 12:26:28 AM »
Oh, not technical at all. Concertino = soloists, ritornello = orchestra.

Thanks for the explanation, I think I can mange to remember that! :)

Quote
Somewhere in your OP you mentioned horns or trombones or woodwinds in the orchestra, and fooled me. :D 
My bad Gurn, although on line both horns and trombones were mentioned, it's actually horns (corni) in both cases!
I'll provide RV numbers and instrumentation in future for true cognoscenti like yourself and masolino (aka fl.traverso)! :)

On another note: this is one of my first "out of the ordinary" Vivaldi discs.
Still nice, but in retrospect it could do with a bit higher voltage.



Any recommendations for a recording with a bit more spice?
(Especially the opus 1/XII "La Folia" (RV 63))


Btw, I can strongly recommend this one for more trio sonatas. Keep the names of the ensemble "L'Astrée" and Giorgio Tabacco in mind - very, very good: exciting but very subtle and elegant, spot on.


Sonata for 2 violins & continuo in F major, RV 68
Sonata for recorder, bassoon & continuo in A minor, RV 86
Sonata for 2 violins & continuo in B flat major, RV 77
Sonata for 2 violins & continuo in F major, RV 70
Sonata for violin, cello & continuo in C minor, RV 83
Sonata for 2 violins & continuo in G major, RV 71

L'Astrée & Giorgio Tabacco


Q
« Last Edit: June 10, 2007, 12:29:04 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: Viva Vivaldi!
« Reply #39 on: June 10, 2007, 01:14:33 AM »
Oh, not technical at all. Concertino = soloists, ritornello = orchestra. Somewhere in your OP you mentioned horns or trombones or woodwinds in the orchestra, and fooled me. :D 

Sorry Gurn, but the barocco term for orchestra is actually repieno or simply (concerto) grosso.  The latter was later appropriated to mean the whole genre, but of course one can see it was so used with a "concertino" section in mind.... :)
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