Author Topic: Joseph Leopold Edler von Eybler (1765-1846)  (Read 6707 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

snyprrr

  • Guest
Joseph Leopold Edler von Eybler (1765-1846)
« on: June 28, 2009, 11:51:45 AM »
Coup of the century! Who would have thought that Eybler didn't have his own thread? mm mm mm

Best known as the first composer called upon to finish Mozart's Requiem (right?), a job which was to fall to Sussmyer, Eybler has since fallen into the kind of obscurity that only allows for one, count them 1 (one), mention in the entire realm of GMG.

I haven't heard the Requiem on CPO, nor, of course, a fairly new cd of Eybler's 3 SQs Op.1 (1794). The only other works I am aware of are the Op.10 SQs (1809; unrecorded).

« Last Edit: December 27, 2009, 10:04:36 PM by snyprrr »

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #1 on: July 01, 2009, 10:08:05 AM »
Uh, I'm sooo offended >:(. Not only is there no love for Eybler, only eight, count em, 8!, people even looked at this. I would not want to be Eybler right now. That must really hurt, ouch. Shame on you all! ;D

Online Gurn Blanston

  • Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 31554
  • Support your local Haydn Society
    • Gurn's Haydn Blog
  • Location: Texas, where else?
  • Currently Listening to:
    Haydn, I reckon.
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #2 on: July 01, 2009, 10:43:02 AM »
Uh, I'm sooo offended >:(. Not only is there no love for Eybler, only eight, count em, 8!, people even looked at this. I would not want to be Eybler right now. That must really hurt, ouch. Shame on you all! ;D

I have the 3 Op 1 quartets and find them quite enjoyable. (I was one of the 8... ;) )

You wouldn't be sorry to get that disk. That's all I've ever heard of him, unfortunately, so he leaves little to talk about elsewise. :-\

8)
Help support GMG by purchasing from Amazon using this link

Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Follow me on Twitter @GurnBlanston106

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 12651
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2009, 10:48:42 AM »
Well, don't feel too bad - many threads are started that receive little attention; but I do own the 3 discs shown below and enjoy the music:

   

Online Gurn Blanston

  • Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 31554
  • Support your local Haydn Society
    • Gurn's Haydn Blog
  • Location: Texas, where else?
  • Currently Listening to:
    Haydn, I reckon.
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #4 on: July 01, 2009, 11:05:59 AM »
Well, don't feel too bad - many threads are started that receive little attention; but I do own the 3 discs shown below and enjoy the music:

   

Oh, that String 5tet / 3-o disk looks interesting. I'll have to look into that. Thanks for the tip, Dave! :)

8)
Help support GMG by purchasing from Amazon using this link

Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Follow me on Twitter @GurnBlanston106

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 12651
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #5 on: July 01, 2009, 02:59:24 PM »
Oh, that String 5tet / 3-o disk looks interesting. I'll have to look into that. Thanks for the tip, Dave! :)

8)

Gurn - I've bought many CDs on the MDG & CPO labels, and just find them outstandingly produced - I'm sure that you'll enjoy that chamber music disc; but, seems that we could fill up our houses w/ these many composers from our 'favorite era' (i.e. for us at least, I guess), and of course if all of their works were still extant & recorded!   Dave  :D

Online Gurn Blanston

  • Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 31554
  • Support your local Haydn Society
    • Gurn's Haydn Blog
  • Location: Texas, where else?
  • Currently Listening to:
    Haydn, I reckon.
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2009, 04:06:13 PM »
Gurn - I've bought many CDs on the MDG & CPO labels, and just find them outstandingly produced - I'm sure that you'll enjoy that chamber music disc; but, seems that we could fill up our houses w/ these many composers from our 'favorite era' (i.e. for us at least, I guess), and of course if all of their works were still extant & recorded!   Dave  :D

Yeah, I'm afraid you're right. Damn snipper for starting this thread... >:(

:D

8)

----------------
Listening to:
Schönbrunn Ensemble - Hob 04 11 Divertimento in D for Flute, Violin & Cello 3rd mvmt - Vivace
Help support GMG by purchasing from Amazon using this link

Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Follow me on Twitter @GurnBlanston106

Bulldog

  • Guest
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #7 on: July 01, 2009, 04:19:18 PM »
Well, don't feel too bad - many threads are started that receive little attention; but I do own the 3 discs shown below and enjoy the music:

   

The MDG disc is a stunner.  In addition to the music being excellent, the performers are outstanding and the sonics state-of-the-art.

Offline Brewski

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 12054
  • "Man With No Shadow" by Makoto Tojiki (2009)
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #8 on: July 01, 2009, 04:42:11 PM »
Believe it or not, *I* actually have an Eybler disc (2 CDs): Die vier letzten Dinge (The Four Last Things), an oratorio, with Hermann Max conducting soloists, the Rheinische Kantorei, and Das Kleine Konzert.  I bought it new, for a pittance, at Academy last year.  I can't say I've listened to it often, but it is quite lovely music and the performers are excellent (as is the norm for CPO).

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Online Gurn Blanston

  • Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 31554
  • Support your local Haydn Society
    • Gurn's Haydn Blog
  • Location: Texas, where else?
  • Currently Listening to:
    Haydn, I reckon.
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #9 on: July 01, 2009, 05:16:42 PM »
The MDG disc is a stunner.  In addition to the music being excellent, the performers are outstanding and the sonics state-of-the-art.

OH! THE PRESSURE...!  :)

Thanks for that, though, Don. You've never steered me wrong. ;)

8)

----------------
Listening to:
Hajdu - Violin  Déri - Cello - Hob 06 04 Sonata in D for Solo Violin & Baß (Cello) 2nd mvmt - Adagio
Help support GMG by purchasing from Amazon using this link

Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Follow me on Twitter @GurnBlanston106

Offline Aeolian harp

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 26
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #10 on: July 04, 2009, 02:36:36 PM »
Just read his bio on wiki.

Quote
On May 30, 1790 Mozart wrote a testimonial for the young Eybler:

"I, the undersigned, attest herewith that I have found the bearer of this, Herr Joseph Eybler, to be a worthy pupil of his famous master Albrechtsberger, a well-grounded composer, equally skilled at chamber music and the church style, fully experienced in the art of the song, also an accomplished organ and clavier player; in short a young musician such, one can only regret, as so seldom has his equal."

Wow. That's huge praise :D

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #11 on: July 20, 2009, 06:40:24 PM »
Looking forward to the SQs soon.

Sean

  • Guest
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #12 on: July 21, 2009, 12:36:21 AM »
I had a recording of the Clarinet concerto: the invention didn't really stay with me but it helps fill in the early romantic picture.

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #13 on: December 27, 2009, 09:40:49 PM »
I have the 3 Op 1 quartets and find them quite enjoyable. (I was one of the 8... ;) )

You wouldn't be sorry to get that disk. That's all I've ever heard of him, unfortunately, so he leaves little to talk about elsewise. :-\

8)

Looking forward to the SQs soon.

OK, so it's six months later! :-[ ;D



Well, I got the SQ disc. Eybler was really the only composer I could find from the years post-Op.33/pre-1800 (about twenty years) who had 3 SQs per disc (as opposed to six (mostly the French, Viotti)). Sorry, but I figure quantity equals quality,... sometimes, haha!

Eybler had the best reputation in Vienna next to Mozart (re: Albrechtsberger comment), and these SQs were written when he was 22, before, apparently, he began to have to cater to aristoctaic tastes. So, as the notes state, these SQs really are one of the best representations of who Eybler was, musically speaking.

The cd starts of with No.2, in c minor. I have to tell you after listening to this disc for a few days, that, considering that this SQ was written in 1787, it reallly reallly sounds like LvB Op.18. One hears Mozart's d minor, and, I tell you the truth, if you want to know where Haydn's "witch's menuet" came from, you have to check out the menuet here. To me, the connection is clear (Gurn, you have it, what do you think?).

The c minor first mvmt. gets my vote for most "metal" minor key SQ mvmt. Considering also its vintage, it's shockingly romantically minor (though it also features elegant majors mix thoughout). I think it gives both Haydn's Fifths, and LvB's Op.18 c minor, a run for their money. And, the HIP performance is deliciously inevitable, very heavy when needed. I really think we could discuss this being written 13 years before Op.18. Indeed, with Eybler at 22, the fire of youth most certainly runs through this music. The main c minor theme is so "evil" ("cool") sounding in that witch's menuet way (along with the previously mentioned third mvmt.).

The Bb Major SQ has just as much going for it from the other end. Honestly, there is a lot of LvB type strange stuff going on here. And in the two middle mvmts. there are some of the coolest modern sounding/misterioso harmonies I've heard ANYWHERE in "normal" classical music up to the 1920s. For some reason Eybler's SQs are reminding me of Busoni's? Are they just that modern? They still have a lot of the stereotypical classical tricks, but then there are passages of strange deep sounding harmonies; and, Eybler's "ways" are pretty unique sounding all the way around.

The D Major Quartet seems the "lightest" of the three. It's slow mvmt., however, really reminds me of a distant cousin of the same in Op.18/1. Not quite as deep, but, as you're listening, you hear those imitative patterns...hmmm...



All I can say is that this favored pupil sounds a lot like LvB Op.18 to me.  I mean, is this guy hot :-*, or what? Can I get a witness?
« Last Edit: December 27, 2009, 10:10:08 PM by snyprrr »

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 12651
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2009, 06:45:44 PM »

Well, I got the SQ disc. Eybler was really the only composer I could find from the years post-Op.33/pre-1800 (about twenty years) who had 3 SQs per disc (as opposed to six (mostly the French, Viotti)). Sorry, but I figure quantity equals quality,... sometimes, haha!

Eybler had the best reputation in Vienna next to Mozart (re: Albrechtsberger comment)......................

Snyprrr - MY GOD! A post of yours that I could read almost completely - finally!   ;D

Just for you, I listened to my disc of Eybler's SQs, Op. 1 tonight @ dinner w/ the Eybler Quartet - these are excellent performances wonderfully recorded by this label.  Now, what interests me is that you make continuous reference to Beethoven's Op. 18 (published in 1801) - Leopold as you know wrote these works when he was 22 y/o in 1787, so who was the innovator and potentially the copier? 

Guess that my bottom line is that these are outstanding works for the era bridging the classical-early romantic eras - the composer died w/i a year of the death of Mendelssohn, so expanded a wide variety of musical genres and changes - this is a wonderful disc worth exploring -  :)



snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Joseph Leopold Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #15 on: December 28, 2009, 08:55:58 PM »
Now, what interests me is that you make continuous reference to Beethoven's Op. 18 (published in 1801) - Leopold as you know wrote these works when he was 22 y/o in 1787, so who was the innovator and potentially the copier? 

That's what I'm sayin'!

Though this set belongs chronologically with the likes of Haydn, Boccherini, Pleyel, and Dittersdorf, it certainly seems emotionally 14 years ahead of its time. It just almost sounds obvious that LvB heard this c minor SQ, doesn't it? I definitely think Haydn might have used it for the witch's menuet.

Gurn? :D



btw- is it "ee-bler", or "eye-bler"?

snyprrr

  • Guest
Re: Joseph Leopold Edler von Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2010, 09:54:24 AM »
I'm just going to lift up the Op.1 SQs as possibly the single best opus of non-Haydn/Mozart SQs. At this point in my studies (aquiring, haha), I have anticipated each new find as a possible masterpiece, but no other composer (save Kraus, perhaps) has crafted such unqualified gems as these three SQs.

I was just listening to the F Major (or was it Eb?), with the Irish Jig Finale. Truly, that little, unmistakeable, Irish melody is like the highlight of my 'research'. I can point to it and say, "Here, look." It's totally unlike anything at the time, so tuneful and ,mmm, 'commercial', haha. Also, the slow mvmt still reminds me of LvB Op.18/1's slow mvmt, with the call and answer.

The c minor, also, has the most cool minor key first mvmt, almost Led Zeppy in it's badness. Perhaps Haydn was thinking to this one when he penned 'The Rider'? It's fair.

If anyone is looking for something worthy, this is it. Albrechtsberger called Eybler the greatest genius in Vienna next to Mozart, and this set of SQs (1789,...the Golden Year) is solid evidence of this.

Yes, it's official. I Knight Thee 'Greatest Single Opus of pre-1800 SQs by a Student". Everything here is in place for the Masterpiece Effect.

Offline Leo K.

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1461
  • Author of 'False Barnyard'
    • Conceptual Music
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bruckner, Bach, Handel, Beethoven
Re: Joseph Leopold Edler von Eybler (1765-1846)
« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2011, 11:22:33 AM »
I'm just going to lift up the Op.1 SQs as possibly the single best opus of non-Haydn/Mozart SQs. At this point in my studies (aquiring, haha), I have anticipated each new find as a possible masterpiece, but no other composer (save Kraus, perhaps) has crafted such unqualified gems as these three SQs.

I was just listening to the F Major (or was it Eb?), with the Irish Jig Finale. Truly, that little, unmistakeable, Irish melody is like the highlight of my 'research'. I can point to it and say, "Here, look." It's totally unlike anything at the time, so tuneful and ,mmm, 'commercial', haha. Also, the slow mvmt still reminds me of LvB Op.18/1's slow mvmt, with the call and answer.

The c minor, also, has the most cool minor key first mvmt, almost Led Zeppy in it's badness. Perhaps Haydn was thinking to this one when he penned 'The Rider'? It's fair.

If anyone is looking for something worthy, this is it. Albrechtsberger called Eybler the greatest genius in Vienna next to Mozart, and this set of SQs (1789,...the Golden Year) is solid evidence of this.

Yes, it's official. I Knight Thee 'Greatest Single Opus of pre-1800 SQs by a Student". Everything here is in place for the Masterpiece Effect.

I wholeheartly agree with you here. Granted, I've only heard the C minor so far, and his first two symphonies, but Eybler's work is intellectually and emotionally gratifying.