Author Topic: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac  (Read 4148 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Sean

  • Guest
Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« on: July 21, 2009, 05:13:08 AM »
Thoughts-

Rather than reflecting on a presentation as in traditionally formal music with perspicuous frameworks providing a critical distance, Scarlatti makes the essential inscrutable character of the aesthetic the sole issue, staying with the same form for over 560 ecstatic sonatas, ie as with a number of other artists peering deeper into the same aesthetic concern. The Scarlatti sonatas are a completely consistent monolithic euphoric block of work with no development but almost constant level of inspiration.

Scarlatti starts phrases as though half way through an idea, adding to the impulsiveness and onward drive- avoiding a thematic Apollonian sense of closure.

The constancy and containment of the harpsichord sound compares with minimalist ecstasy, piano performances almost completely missing this.

Bliss consciousness is found in repeating the form as well as the note and motivic repetition.

Scarlatti was a lover- married twice and ten children, last in his 60s.

There’s a device where the each half of the sonatas lead up to a pivotal point: the first half often contains the main thematic variety and the second makes more use repetitive figurations, combined with modulations: ie the most repetitive section is the climactic finale, also often preceded by a fermata or pause to heighten the tension.

The Scarlatti sonatas are all one movement in binary form, resolving duality into unity.

The sonatas were mostly written in the second half of his life: once he settled on what he was doing there was no need ever to do anything else, but just to explore bliss within this perfect sphere- critical formal exploration at least as a first concern was irrelevant.

No matter what the history and significance of compositional devices and techniques, he just treated them in the same juxtapositional, playful way (see 1980 Grove).

And (Grove), there’s a basic waywardness and individuality on all levels, including things like false relations, overcomposition, or imitation, the opening halves unstable in material and tonality: he treats all devices as just more material for juxtaposition and (Dionysian) play, for instance the great baroque fugal gestures had no potency for him but just became one more of his contrasting textures- and often appearing grotesque, taunting or irrational.

The style also relates to postmodern non-dialectical nihilistic type criticism- bliss and truth being transferred into a vertical direction: postmodernism’s stasis and anti-linear progression similarly undermine dialectical thesis, antithesis, synthesis etc.

There's also the constant English enthusiasm for the sonatas, reflecting that culture’s scepticism for theoretically driven structures.

Grove article ends with comparing Soler’s similar sonatas to Scarlatti’s: ‘…aping many features of Scarlatti’s form, rhetoric and tonal audacity, but never achieving the distinction of his model and thus showing the difficulty, if not impossibility, of isolating the factors contributing to the quality of the music’: ie intuitively, aesthetically perceived interrelations between the music’s components (as similar juxtapositional Wagner or Messiaen etc)- ie Dionysian inner form, not from the intellect.

karlhenning

  • Guest
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2009, 06:23:07 AM »
Dionysiac? The Diner, ho!

bwv 1080

  • Guest
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2009, 09:39:36 AM »
Forgetting Lacan: Social realism in the works of Scarlatti

Thomas R. Tilton
Department of Music, University of North Carolina

F. Wilhelm Finnis
Department of Musical Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


 
1. Expressions of defining characteristic

“Society is responsible for class divisions,” says Baudrillard. In a sense, McElwaine[1] holds that we have to choose between semantic theory and postcapitalist cultural theory.

“Sexual identity is part of the economy of art,” says Sartre; however, according to Buxton[2] , it is not so much sexual identity that is part of the economy of art, but rather the rubicon, and hence the genre, of sexual identity. An abundance of deconstructions concerning the defining characteristic, and eventually the absurdity, of neodialectic culture exist. But social realism implies that consensus must come from the masses.

Several appropriations concerning structuralist Marxism may be revealed. It could be said that Derrida uses the term ’semantic theory’ to denote a precapitalist totality.

The premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality states that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy, given that narrativity is equal to culture. But if Marxist socialism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and constructivist narrative.

Long[3] suggests that the works of Scarlatti are empowering. Thus, Lacan uses the term ’social realism’ to denote the dialectic of capitalist class.

An abundance of sublimations concerning the role of the writer as observer exist. But the subject is interpolated into a subtextual paradigm of reality that includes language as a paradox.

2. Social realism and Debordist situation

In the works of Scarlatti, a predominant concept is the distinction between closing and opening. Lyotard promotes the use of dialectic Marxism to read reality. However, Derrida uses the term ‘Debordist situation’ to denote the difference between class and society.

“Sexual identity is meaningless,” says Debord. If Baudrillardist hyperreality holds, we have to choose between Foucaultist power relations and precultural theory. It could be said that several deappropriations concerning social realism may be discovered.

The subject is contextualised into a that includes consciousness as a totality. In a sense, de Selby[4] holds that we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and Batailleist `powerful communication’.

The primary theme of the works of Scarlatti is a self-justifying paradox. Thus, the fatal flaw, and subsequent stasis, of social realism intrinsic to Scarlatti's Sonatas is is also evident in Beverly Hills 90210, although in a more neomaterial sense.

If Baudrillardist hyperreality holds, we have to choose between Debordist situation and the capitalist paradigm of consensus. However, the main theme of Sargeant’s[5] model of pretextual socialism is the fatal flaw, and thus the stasis, of deconstructive class.

Scuglia[6] states that the works of Scarlatti are modernistic. Thus, Sartre uses the term ‘Debordist situation’ to denote a self-referential reality.

3. Burroughs and submaterialist dialectic theory

In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of neotextual language. The primary theme of the works of Burroughs is the genre, and subsequent absurdity, of dialectic class. Therefore, the within/without distinction prevalent in Burroughs’s The Ticket that Exploded emerges again in Nova Express.

The main theme of Sargeant’s[7] analysis of social realism is not theory, but pretheory. The primary theme of the works of Burroughs is a mythopoetical totality. In a sense, Debord suggests the use of Debordist situation to attack class divisions.

“Society is intrinsically dead,” says Lacan. Lyotard’s essay on social realism suggests that sexuality serves to entrench the status quo. However, the characteristic theme of von Ludwig’s[8] critique of dialectic dematerialism is the role of the reader as artist.

In The Ticket that Exploded, Burroughs examines Baudrillardist hyperreality; in Naked Lunch he affirms Baudrillardist simulacra. Thus, if Debordist situation holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neosemiotic rationalism.

Derrida promotes the use of the conceptualist paradigm of reality to analyse and challenge sexual identity. But the premise of Debordist situation implies that narrativity is impossible.

The primary theme of the works of Burroughs is a posttextual reality. In a sense, Prinn[9] holds that we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and capitalist construction.

The subject is interpolated into a that includes truth as a paradox. It could be said that Marx’s essay on Baudrillardist hyperreality states that expression comes from the collective unconscious.

The main theme of von Junz’s[10] analysis of Debordist situation is not theory, as Baudrillardist hyperreality suggests, but subtheory. But Derrida uses the term ’social realism’ to denote the common ground between society and class
« Last Edit: July 21, 2009, 09:42:03 AM by bwv 1080 »

Sean

  • Guest
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2009, 05:17:54 PM »
Well, the idea of sexuality as culturally defined and not innate is one of the most peculiar and stupid in the history of philosophy.

Offline Josquin des Prez

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3654
  • Lyric Suite, Opus131
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #4 on: July 22, 2009, 07:25:17 AM »
Forgetting Lacan: Social realism in the works of Scarlatti

Thomas R. Tilton
Department of Music, University of North Carolina

F. Wilhelm Finnis
Department of Musical Studies, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


 
1. Expressions of defining characteristic

“Society is responsible for class divisions,” says Baudrillard. In a sense, McElwaine[1] holds that we have to choose between semantic theory and postcapitalist cultural theory.

“Sexual identity is part of the economy of art,” says Sartre; however, according to Buxton[2] , it is not so much sexual identity that is part of the economy of art, but rather the rubicon, and hence the genre, of sexual identity. An abundance of deconstructions concerning the defining characteristic, and eventually the absurdity, of neodialectic culture exist. But social realism implies that consensus must come from the masses.

Several appropriations concerning structuralist Marxism may be revealed. It could be said that Derrida uses the term ’semantic theory’ to denote a precapitalist totality.

The premise of Baudrillardist hyperreality states that the collective is fundamentally used in the service of hierarchy, given that narrativity is equal to culture. But if Marxist socialism holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and constructivist narrative.

Long[3] suggests that the works of Scarlatti are empowering. Thus, Lacan uses the term ’social realism’ to denote the dialectic of capitalist class.

An abundance of sublimations concerning the role of the writer as observer exist. But the subject is interpolated into a subtextual paradigm of reality that includes language as a paradox.

2. Social realism and Debordist situation

In the works of Scarlatti, a predominant concept is the distinction between closing and opening. Lyotard promotes the use of dialectic Marxism to read reality. However, Derrida uses the term ‘Debordist situation’ to denote the difference between class and society.

“Sexual identity is meaningless,” says Debord. If Baudrillardist hyperreality holds, we have to choose between Foucaultist power relations and precultural theory. It could be said that several deappropriations concerning social realism may be discovered.

The subject is contextualised into a that includes consciousness as a totality. In a sense, de Selby[4] holds that we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and Batailleist `powerful communication’.

The primary theme of the works of Scarlatti is a self-justifying paradox. Thus, the fatal flaw, and subsequent stasis, of social realism intrinsic to Scarlatti's Sonatas is is also evident in Beverly Hills 90210, although in a more neomaterial sense.

If Baudrillardist hyperreality holds, we have to choose between Debordist situation and the capitalist paradigm of consensus. However, the main theme of Sargeant’s[5] model of pretextual socialism is the fatal flaw, and thus the stasis, of deconstructive class.

Scuglia[6] states that the works of Scarlatti are modernistic. Thus, Sartre uses the term ‘Debordist situation’ to denote a self-referential reality.

3. Burroughs and submaterialist dialectic theory

In the works of Burroughs, a predominant concept is the concept of neotextual language. The primary theme of the works of Burroughs is the genre, and subsequent absurdity, of dialectic class. Therefore, the within/without distinction prevalent in Burroughs’s The Ticket that Exploded emerges again in Nova Express.

The main theme of Sargeant’s[7] analysis of social realism is not theory, but pretheory. The primary theme of the works of Burroughs is a mythopoetical totality. In a sense, Debord suggests the use of Debordist situation to attack class divisions.

“Society is intrinsically dead,” says Lacan. Lyotard’s essay on social realism suggests that sexuality serves to entrench the status quo. However, the characteristic theme of von Ludwig’s[8] critique of dialectic dematerialism is the role of the reader as artist.

In The Ticket that Exploded, Burroughs examines Baudrillardist hyperreality; in Naked Lunch he affirms Baudrillardist simulacra. Thus, if Debordist situation holds, we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and neosemiotic rationalism.

Derrida promotes the use of the conceptualist paradigm of reality to analyse and challenge sexual identity. But the premise of Debordist situation implies that narrativity is impossible.

The primary theme of the works of Burroughs is a posttextual reality. In a sense, Prinn[9] holds that we have to choose between Baudrillardist hyperreality and capitalist construction.

The subject is interpolated into a that includes truth as a paradox. It could be said that Marx’s essay on Baudrillardist hyperreality states that expression comes from the collective unconscious.

The main theme of von Junz’s[10] analysis of Debordist situation is not theory, as Baudrillardist hyperreality suggests, but subtheory. But Derrida uses the term ’social realism’ to denote the common ground between society and class

Did you get that off the postmodern analysis generator site? They are getting good at this.

karlhenning

  • Guest
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2009, 07:29:37 AM »
Did you get that off the postmodern analysis generator site? They are getting good at this.

Better'n anything Sean's ever posted here.

Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3503
  • Location: Chicagoland
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2009, 11:56:50 PM »
Better'n anything Sean's ever posted here.

Maybe we can combine the two, and get a postmodern analysis of Asian sex tourism.
formerly VELIMIR (before that, Spitvalve)

"Who knows not strict counterpoint, lives and dies an ignoramus" - CPE Bach

jlaurson

  • Guest
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #7 on: December 08, 2011, 07:20:51 AM »

Original and Happy Freaks: Alexandre Tharaud’s Latest
http://ionarts.blogspot.com/2011/12/original-and-happy-freaks-alexandre.html


Quote
Greatness in an artist, a pianist, is a rummy thing. In a variation on Potter Stewart’s pornography dictum: it’s easier to hear than to define. Especially when a pianist, Alexandre Tharaud, finds greatness in smallness: He’s a master of miniatures; a virtuoso of vignettes. Greatness in a pianist like Wilhelm Backhauslies in the great calm, the stoic unfussiness in which long lines or piled-on heroism are played, in the resistance to bending even one phrase for effect if the effect on the whole isn’t productive. Greatness in the results of Alexandre Tharaud (in any case a musician who would recoil from having that word being applied to him), lies in the innately-judicious, instinctive application of wit, exaggeration, whimsy, playfulness, tenderness, and the like. Much of that has to do with the repertoire, of course: What makes a Bach Sicilienne or a bit by Couperin brilliant may not work for a Brahms Sonata—and that which lifts a Hammerklavier Sonata to a new plane may in turn be insufficient to inspire the “original and happy freaks”, to use Charles Burney’s coyly sublime description of the Scarlatti Sonatas. Greatness, ultimately lies in getting it just right for the piece being played, in the moment one is playing it...


With audio samples, incl. Scott Ross & Gottlieb Wallisch

Offline PaulSC

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 475
  • Location: California
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2011, 11:44:49 AM »
Ha ha! My actual thought process just now: “Three consecutive Domenico Scarlatti threads in Unread Posts!? Latest Post by JLaurson in each one!? Well, Alexandre Tharaud must have a new Scarlatti disc out…”

I'll check it out, I promise!
Musik ist ein unerschöpfliches Meer. — Joseph Riepel

jlaurson

  • Guest
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #9 on: December 08, 2011, 12:18:18 PM »
Ha ha! My actual thought process just now: “Three consecutive Domenico Scarlatti threads in Unread Posts!? Latest Post by JLaurson in each one!? Well, Alexandre Tharaud must have a new Scarlatti disc out…”

I'll check it out, I promise!

Elementary, Watson!  :D

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 19518
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2011, 01:45:58 PM »
Elementary, Watson!  :D

Is this a Scarlatti thread, seriously? ::)

There should be a penalty for awaking any of Sean's threads from the dead...  8)

Q

jlaurson

  • Guest
Re: Scarlatti and the Dionysiac
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2011, 03:14:24 PM »
Is this a Scarlatti thread, seriously? ::)

There should be a penalty for awaking any of Sean's threads from the dead...  8)

Q

In the alphabetical composer section, this is listed as the 'official' Scarlatti Thread. Should that honor go to a different one?