Author Topic: Leonid Polovinkin  (Read 2916 times)

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Offline schweitzeralan

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Leonid Polovinkin
« on: August 13, 2009, 05:26:48 AM »
I just received the Fuga Libera of the several Plovinkin piano works performed by Anait Karpova.  I'm familiar with a few, quite rarely known works available on sheet music entitled "piano Works of the Early Soviet Union.'  I was impressed by the few representative Polovinkin entries.  They appear to be quite subtle and harmonies which smack of late impressionism and tend to anticipate modernist tendencies.  Only two works I know are on the disc.

 From my first and only listening, I get the impression that much of the coloristic propensities possibly lurking in Polovinkin's are overtaken by a totally virtuosic, higly percussive technique on the part of the pianist.  The few works represented on the sheet music are subtle suggestive of Scriabin; whereas the highly technically skilled pianist emphasizes the percussive rhythms.

  Karpova renders a Prokofiev adumbration in her interpretation.  I guess this is how the composer intended it to be: viz, hasty, virtuosic, minimally melodious.  As an amateur I can't adjudicate the performance. Karpova is quite the brilliant, fluent performer.  I just wonder if the representative music is all that devoid of harmonic nuances.  Perhaps, again, I am wrong in my assumed interpretation.  I doubt there will be many acknowledgemet of this composer's recent exposure to a severely limited public.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2009, 05:29:28 AM by schweitzeralan »

Offline schweitzeralan

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Re: Leonid Polovinkin
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2009, 06:29:05 AM »
I just received the Fuga Libera of the several Plovinkin piano works performed by Anait Karpova.  I'm familiar with a few, quite rarely known works available on sheet music entitled "piano Works of the Early Soviet Union.'  I was impressed by the few representative Polovinkin entries.  They appear to be quite subtle and harmonies which smack of late impressionism and tend to anticipate modernist tendencies.  Only two works I know are on the disc.

 From my first and only listening, I get the impression that much of the coloristic propensities possibly lurking in Polovinkin's are overtaken by a totally virtuosic, higly percussive technique on the part of the pianist.  The few works represented on the sheet music are subtle suggestive of Scriabin; whereas the highly technically skilled pianist emphasizes the percussive rhythms.

  Karpova renders a Prokofiev adumbration in her interpretation.  I guess this is how the composer intended it to be: viz, hasty, virtuosic, minimally melodious.  As an amateur I can't adjudicate the performance. Karpova is quite the brilliant, fluent performer.  I just wonder if the representative music is all that devoid of harmonic nuances.  Perhaps, again, I am wrong in my assumed interpretation.  I doubt there will be many acknowledgemet of this composer's recent exposure to a severely limited public.

Poor Leonid, I guess he wasn't up to it for most listeners. I don't think this recording helps, at least one is available. There are some great moments that do survive in this performance.  Glad at least it is available.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2009, 11:54:16 AM by schweitzeralan »

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Leonid Polovinkin
« Reply #2 on: May 03, 2019, 04:19:52 PM »
A new cd release of Polovinkin music:
https://composers-heritage.ru/en/composers/POLOVINKIN/
 CD «СКАЗКА О СКАЗКЕ (Pinocchio's tale)
Orfeo Symphonic Orchestra conducted by Kondrashov