Author Topic: Favorite Baroque Opera  (Read 4716 times)

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Offline TheGSMoeller

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Favorite Baroque Opera
« on: August 07, 2012, 09:42:35 AM »
Hopefully this doesn't overwhelm GMG with all of the "favorite" or "greatest" threads, but I just had to add one  ;D


I want to know your favorite Opera from the Baroque Period, and why it is your favorite, a long explanation is not needed but at least enough insight as to why it means what it does to you.

And for bonus points, throw in which recording of that opera is your preferred choice. If there are enough posts I'll tally up the totals.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2012, 11:43:47 AM by TheGSMoeller »

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2012, 11:18:07 AM »
Pretty much anything by Handel. Specifically, though, Agrippina really touches my heart for it's amazing lyricism.





« Last Edit: June 27, 2014, 03:08:30 PM by Dancing Divertimentian »
Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Sammy

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #2 on: August 07, 2012, 11:37:44 AM »
Handel's Giulio Cesare - the best arias, singing and direction of all Handel operas:



Leon

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #3 on: August 07, 2012, 11:40:42 AM »
Would Castor et Pollux by Rameau count?



I think this recording is the one in the very fine Harmoni Mundi 30-CD box of music from the Enlightenment. 

I really enjoyed it.

Offline Sammy

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #4 on: August 07, 2012, 11:46:42 AM »
Would Castor et Pollux by Rameau count?



It's baroque, it's an opera, it counts!!

Leon

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #5 on: August 07, 2012, 11:49:00 AM »
It's baroque, it's an opera, it counts!!

 :D

I wasn't sure when the cut-off date was for Baroque.  C&P originally came out in 1737 (or thereabouts) and then was revised in the 1750s.


kishnevi

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #6 on: August 07, 2012, 05:15:06 PM »
Handel: Ariodante,  particularly in the recording with Lorraine Hunt Lieberson.  It's a favorite because it touches me more emotionally--seems to explore the minds and hearts of the characters more deeply than most other operas of the period, including most of Handel's own output.

Offline The new erato

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2012, 10:26:49 PM »
I think Handels Ariodante as well. Handels best operas are psychological dramas to a degree not usual in  the baroque, though I think it's a close tie with Monteverdis Orfeo - very human and moral and stripped of all excesses. Though I also love the glitziness of Lully and the frenchies.

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2012, 03:33:38 PM »
Thank you for those who replied!

Looks as if Handel is a popular choice. I own Alcina and Hercules (which I believe is considered a musical drama rather than opera). I may have to invest into more.


Offline val

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2012, 12:06:06 AM »
My favorite is perhaps Purcell "Dido & Aeneas". But I love deeply "Orfeo" and "L'Incoronazione of Popea" of Monteverdi, "La Calisto" of Cavalli, "Atys" of Lully, "Zoroastre" and "Les Boreades" of Rameau and Händel's "Giulio Cesare" and "Ariodante".

Offline Verena

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Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2012, 07:06:14 AM »
Handel for me, especially Giulio Cesare; wonderfully lively arias, but also lyrical moments
« Last Edit: August 22, 2012, 07:08:37 AM by Verena »

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2012, 07:20:26 AM »
My favorite would be Monteverdi's Orfeo. It was the first baroque opera that showed me what was possible.
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline Florestan

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2012, 08:40:55 AM »
Ex aequo



For their gorgeous melodies, passion and lyricism.
“Meanwhile thy spirit lifts its pinions
In music's most serene dominions;
Catching the winds that fan that happy heaven.
And we sail on, away, afar
Without a course, without a star,
But by the instinct of sweet music driven." — Shelley

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2012, 08:42:05 AM »
Ex aequo



That was my first Orfeo purchase and still my favorite.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Favorite Baroque Opera
« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2014, 04:47:47 AM »
Purcell: Dido and Aeneas
Handel: Giulio Cesare, Alcina, Rinaldo (I have a dozen more, but don't know them well enough, I really like Handel, but I often lack the patience for the operas and I am more familiar with the oratorios)
Monteverdi: L'orfeo (again, I have only a vague acquaintance with the other two)

Of Rameau I have the most famous ones (Hippolyte & Aricie and Castor & Pollux) on my shelf, but I have not mustered the patience to listen to them...
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

 

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