Author Topic: Terry Riley (b. 1935)  (Read 23354 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline torut

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1011
Re: Terry Riley (b. 1935)
« Reply #120 on: October 19, 2015, 09:29:33 PM »
Terry Riley : Requiem for Adam



Requiem for Adam is a studio album by the Kronos Quartet. The music was composed by Terry Riley, commissioned by the quartet; the album is a requiem for Adam Harrington, the son of Kronos co-founder David Harrington.

Adam Harrington, age 16, died of heart failure caused by a blood clot, sustained while hiking with his family on Mount Diablo, a 3,849 feet mountain in the San Francisco Bay Area, on Easter Sunday, 1995. Riley finished the three-movement composition in 1998, and it was first performed in the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam on 28 June 1999.

The first movement is beautiful. The second movement was really surprising when I first heard it.

On November 13th, Cantaloupe music will release Transient Glory III by Young People's Chorus of New York City, which includes Riley's Another Secret eQuation. I think this is the first recording of the piece.

[track list]
Michael Gordon: Every Stop on the F Train
Bora Yoon: Semaphore Conductus
Meredith Monk: Things Heaven and Hell
Terry Riley: Another Secret eQuation (ft. Kronos Quartet)
John Corigliano: One Sweet Morning
Paquito D’Rivera: Tembandumba (ft. Payton MacDonald)

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 11050
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Terry Riley (b. 1935)
« Reply #121 on: March 11, 2018, 01:33:01 AM »
I hardly know anything by this composer. I just heard 'One Earth, One People, One Love' on BBC Radio 3 which I found rather moving and gripping. Any recommendations for a Riley novice?

PS tracking back through this thread I realise that I do have Shri Camel but can't have listened to it for a long time (am listening to it now).

PPS Requiem for Adam looks worth investigating and there is an inexpensive boxed set of Riley's music also at least one CD of his music on Naxos.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2018, 01:54:04 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Papy Oli

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3374
Re: Terry Riley (b. 1935)
« Reply #122 on: March 11, 2018, 02:59:45 AM »
Vandermolen,

In case that is of interest, there is a documentary currently on BBC I-Player on minimalists, that includes an interview of Terry Riley.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/b09tbfp6?suggid=b09tbfp6

The 2-part documentary also includes Glass, Reich and Lamonte Young. I found it very instructive and entertaining.

A few Glass CD's have gone in my basket as a consequence. Need to look further at the others as well.
Olivier

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 11050
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Terry Riley (b. 1935)
« Reply #123 on: March 11, 2018, 04:35:53 AM »
Vandermolen,

In case that is of interest, there is a documentary currently on BBC I-Player on minimalists, that includes an interview of Terry Riley.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/b09tbfp6?suggid=b09tbfp6

The 2-part documentary also includes Glass, Reich and Lamonte Young. I found it very instructive and entertaining.

A few Glass CD's have gone in my basket as a consequence. Need to look further at the others as well.

Papy Oli,

Very many thanks.

That looks like a very good starting place.

 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline aukhawk

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 683
  • Frankie
  • Location: England
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach to Björk
Re: Terry Riley (b. 1935)
« Reply #124 on: March 14, 2018, 04:41:17 AM »
In case that is of interest, there is a documentary currently on BBC I-Player on minimalists, that includes an interview of Terry Riley.
https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episodes/b09tbfp6?suggid=b09tbfp6
The 2-part documentary also includes Glass, Reich and Lamonte Young. I found it very instructive and entertaining.

I enjoyed those as well, though the actual analysis of the music was not as detailed as I would have liked.  In interview, Terry Riley seems a very likeable and self-effacing character.  So too, to some extent, Steve Reich.  And I was rather interested that each of them alluded at some point to a spiritual side - I don't know why that should surprise me, but it did.