Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 62356 times)

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Offline schnittkease

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #360 on: July 16, 2018, 07:45:22 PM »
At the other end 13 is my favourite - very moving and memorable.

Ditto. While Myaskovsky was able to produce masterpieces in a more conservative vein, it's unfortunate that he (in Boris Schwarz' words) "retreated into safe conventionality" - a sizeable loss, but at least he didn't suffer the same fate as Mosolov or Popov.

Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #361 on: July 16, 2018, 09:39:37 PM »
Ditto. While Myaskovsky was able to produce masterpieces in a more conservative vein, it's unfortunate that he (in Boris Schwarz' words) "retreated into safe conventionality" - a sizeable loss, but at least he didn't suffer the same fate as Mosolov or Popov.

I don't know so much about Mosolov apart from the famous 'Iron Foundry' but Popov is a very tragic figure who drank himself to death. His phantasmagoric First Symphony is IMHO one of the only works which can stand alongside Shostakovich's 4th Symphony (Weinberg's 5th Symphony is the other one I have in mind). His Symphony 2 'Motherland' although more conventional is very moving in its wartime context and the last one No.6 is genuinely tragic with its references to Boris Godunov at the end.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #362 on: July 20, 2018, 05:08:46 PM »
At the other end 13 is my favourite - very moving and memorable.

I'm making my way through the quartets. I've listened to the 5th one (and my favorite) thus far. I can feel a strong mix of sentiments and emotions, many of them being pessimistic and desolate, but at the end of the day the works have been engaging.
« Last Edit: July 20, 2018, 05:10:52 PM by SymphonicAddict »

Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #363 on: July 20, 2018, 09:24:50 PM »
I'm making my way through the quartets. I've listened to the 5th one (and my favorite) thus far. I can feel a strong mix of sentiments and emotions, many of them being pessimistic and desolate, but at the end of the day the works have been engaging.

Pleased to hear this Cesar - makes me want to listen to them again. I always tend to listen to No. 13 but will especially look out for No. 5.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #364 on: July 22, 2018, 09:43:13 AM »
Pleased to hear this Cesar - makes me want to listen to them again. I always tend to listen to No. 13 but will especially look out for No. 5.

I'm realizing they are worth listening with each listen with no doubts. I'm looking forward to listening to the 13th.

Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #365 on: September 08, 2018, 12:34:55 PM »
The otherwise, as far as I'm aware, unrecorded, Violin Sonata (1947) is a major discovery as far as I'm concerned. I can't understand why it's not as well known (or at least as well recorded) as Miaskovsky's cello sonatas, string quartets or violin and cello concertos. It's melodic and highly approachable with memorable thematic material. Apparently the self-critical composer found it awkward and intractable which might explain its neglect. This fine CD should help to make it much better known. It dates from the period of his 25th Symphony, considered one of his finest symphonies:

« Last Edit: September 08, 2018, 10:02:36 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline torut

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #366 on: September 08, 2018, 04:03:10 PM »
The otherwise, as far as I'm aware, unrecorded, Violin Sonata (1947) is a major discovery as far as I'm concerned. I can't understand why it's not as well known ( or at least as well recorded) as Miaskovsky's cello sonatas, string quartets or violin and cello concertos. It's melodic and highly approachable with memorable thematic material. Apparently the self-critical composer found it awkward and intractable which might explain its neglect. This fine CD should help to make it much better known. It dates from the period of his 25th Symphony, considered one of his finest symphonies:



I didn't know about this work. Thank you for posting it. I downloaded the album and just listened to the Myaskovsky's piece. The first movement is very melodic, and the lively 2nd movement is captivating. The composition is nice, but to be honest, the violin's vibrato is a bit too much for me. Anyway, this release is a good news.

Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #367 on: September 08, 2018, 10:04:44 PM »
I didn't know about this work. Thank you for posting it. I downloaded the album and just listened to the Myaskovsky's piece. The first movement is very melodic, and the lively 2nd movement is captivating. The composition is nice, but to be honest, the violin's vibrato is a bit too much for me. Anyway, this release is a good news.
I'm glad that you enjoyed it despite the vibrato. I listened to the Shebalin yesterday with much pleasure as well. Yes, I especially like the first movement of the Miaskovsky but thoroughly enjoyed the whole work - a nice discovery.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2018, 10:06:22 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline torut

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #368 on: September 09, 2018, 02:09:23 PM »
I'm glad that you enjoyed it despite the vibrato. I listened to the Shebalin yesterday with much pleasure as well. Yes, I especially like the first movement of the Miaskovsky but thoroughly enjoyed the whole work - a nice discovery.

I am mostly listening to early and contemporary music recently, and perhaps that is the reason I don't get used to this style. But I agree that Shebalin is very good. It is a substantial work, no less than Myaskovsky, and much better than Nechaev (IMO).

Online vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #369 on: September 09, 2018, 10:10:16 PM »
I am mostly listening to early and contemporary music recently, and perhaps that is the reason I don't get used to this style. But I agree that Shebalin is very good. It is a substantial work, no less than Myaskovsky, and much better than Nechaev (IMO).
Shebalin was a fine composer. Symphony 1 and 5 in particular of those I know. I haven't heard the Nechaev yet. Shebalin's 5th Symphony is in memory of his teacher Miaskovsky and No.1 shows the influence of NM.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).