Author Topic: Antonio Sacchini (1710-1786)  (Read 1317 times)

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snyprrr

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Antonio Sacchini (1710-1786)
« on: December 17, 2009, 09:54:44 AM »
You want content?

How come Rob Newman missed this guy?

Sacchini, anyone?


Bulldog

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Re: Antonio Sacchini (1710-1786)
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2009, 10:42:27 AM »
Your post reminded me that I have an Arkadia disc of Sacchini's 6 string quartets, Op. 2 played by the Quartetto
Stauffer that was recorded in 1993.  It's likely deleted by now - perhaps the label as well.  At any rate, it's fine music, all in major keys.  I'm giving it a play right now.

After a little research, I found that Arkadia still exists and has a website as well.  Unfortunately, their classical category appears dead.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2009, 10:58:21 AM by Bulldog »

snyprrr

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Re: Antonio Sacchini (1710-1786)
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2010, 08:03:30 AM »
Your post reminded me that I have an Arkadia disc of Sacchini's 6 string quartets, Op. 2 played by the Quartetto
Stauffer that was recorded in 1993.  It's likely deleted by now - perhaps the label as well.  At any rate, it's fine music, all in major keys.  I'm giving it a play right now.

After a little research, I found that Arkadia still exists and has a website as well.  Unfortunately, their classical category appears dead.

I got the SQ album last week.

Well, hmmm, interesting. This comes at the end of my year long research into pre-1800 SQs. The notes ask "what could be more Mozatean?", and, when one considers that Mozart's early SQs are based on the Italian model (Sammartini, no?), then one begins to hear the uniqeness of this Sacchini set.

No, it's not like Boccherini. I'll admit I haven't heard the early Mozz yet, but, am I to believe they sound any much different than this set? I'm just going to say that these are the epitome of the Italian style (there!, I said it). They really have a style that is different from Boccherini and others.

There are no manuscripts for these. They are dated to 1772-74, but, of course, they think they have an earlier composition date.

SQ No.5 is in the "church style", and this SQ sounds different than the rest. It has the "learned" style, and comes off sounding like the most baroque moments of Haydn's Opp. 9/17, and the c-minor and f-minor SQs of Kraus. This one SQ makes a great calling card.



Well, I think I've come to the end of my initial pre-1800 research. Everything else (Vanhal, Wranitzky, ozeluh,... all on Panton) is either OOP or ridiculously expensive.

Sacchini BOTTOM LINE:

One of the most immediately happy and easy listening sets of pre-1800 SQs, similar in smile-effect with the Viotti set on Talent. No one so far sounds as 'Italian',... still haven't heard early Mozz, Sammartini, or Cambini. Totally diferent than Boccherini.