Author Topic: Fanny Mendelssohn (1805 - 1847)  (Read 2094 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ciel_Rouge

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 273
  • Location: Baltic Sea
  • Currently Listening to:
    Brahms, Gluck

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Fanny Mendelssohn (1805 - 1847)
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2010, 10:09:27 AM »
The songs composed by Fanny that she selected for inclusion at Felix's bidding were:
Op 8.2 Das Heimweh
Op 8.3 Italien
Op 8.12 Suleika und Hatem
Op 9.7 Sehnsucht
Op 9.10 Verlust
Op 9.12 Die Nonne
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 14443
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Fanny Mendelssohn (1805 - 1847)
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2010, 04:39:28 PM »
Well, maybe this thread should be expanded to more of Fanny's compositions beyond just her songs, which were excellent - I just finished reading the book below - Mendelssohn's older sister (by 4 yrs only) was extremely talented but was often discouraged by her family (including Felix) to published her music - if she had lived just 50 yrs or so later, her reputation (and likely the amount of her output) would have been much greater - just unfortunate - so I would suggest to comment on what of her 'total' works are now on recordings - she was a 'bright light' that was purposely extinguished by the conventions of her times -  :-\


Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Fanny Mendelssohn (1805 - 1847)
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2010, 09:13:48 AM »
Larry Todd's biography of Fanny Hensel has now been published and gives a fairly comprehensive coverage of her compositions. Apart from some of her songs and piano music I have recordings of her string quartet, piano quartet, piano trio and some of her choral music. I haven't yet tracked down her overture although I've heard a recording played over the radio. The trio and the quartet are both very fine works and there ought to be more recordings available than there are.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.