Author Topic: Musical Offering BWV 1079  (Read 27116 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Musical Offering BWV 1079
« Reply #120 on: February 06, 2019, 06:23:29 AM »


Imagine a bunch of young British toffs playing Bach’s musical offering, maybe in a private concert in an Oxford SCR, and you’ll get the style of this recording from The Bach Players.

I love the sound in the ensemble pieces, the flute sounds fabulous to me, and it’s very truthfully and beautifully engineered. I’m not sure what to make of the keyboard player in solo pieces, when he has nowhere to hide,  I enjoyed hearing the recercar à 6 for the way he rolls the chords, the ricercar à 3 less so - generally his approach is the opposite of flamboyant. The instrument is fine if limited in the bass department.

The approach generally suits me very well, maybe because I am both British and a gent. And indeed it may not be totally inappropriate given the context of the first performance
« Last Edit: February 06, 2019, 06:36:15 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Musical Offering BWV 1079
« Reply #121 on: July 25, 2019, 04:55:33 AM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/J69f-LdsacE" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/J69f-LdsacE</a>

The above is Rosalyn Tureck's BBC recording of WTC 2. At the end of it (2:47 or thereabouts) there's an interview with Michael Oliver where she says that, according to Wolf, there is internal evidence in the music of the keyboard part of the trio sonata in opfer to show that it was "conceived" for the piano. "In the actual figuration of this work it's very clearly a pianistic kind of conception," she says. Is that right? I don't have Wolf's book.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 04:58:59 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Musical Offering BWV 1079
« Reply #122 on: July 25, 2019, 06:22:12 AM »

The above is Rosalyn Tureck's BBC recording of WTC 2. At the end of it (2:47 or thereabouts) there's an interview with Michael Oliver where she says that, according to Wolf, there is internal evidence in the music of the keyboard part of the trio sonata in opfer to show that it was "conceived" for the piano. "In the actual figuration of this work it's very clearly a pianistic kind of conception," she says. Is that right? I don't have Wolf's book.

Wolff writes (Bach,The learned musician page 429):

Moreover the motivic material of the interludes in the three-part Ricercar, significantly different from Bach's  other keyboard works, was inspired by and conceived for the fortepiano and its new - unlike the harpsichord's - dynamically flexible sound.

The words "significantly different from Bach's other keyboard works" may be questioned. Like all human beings Wolff sees what he wants.

He also argues, like so many before him, that the three-part Ricercare more or less is similar to the fugue Bach improvised on the kings fortepiano. Obviously this can't be proved.



« Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 06:26:44 AM by (: premont :) »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Musical Offering BWV 1079
« Reply #123 on: July 25, 2019, 06:44:20 AM »
Interestingly that's not what Tureck says, she specificly attributes to him the idea that the keyboard part in the trio sonata is for piano.

Just by the by the piece that seems to me "significantly different from Bach's  other keyboard works", or indeed anyone else's, is the solo keyboard movement in BWV 1019.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 06:46:37 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Musical Offering BWV 1079
« Reply #124 on: July 25, 2019, 07:26:17 AM »
Interestingly that's not what Tureck says, she specificly attributes to him the idea that the keyboard part in the trio sonata is for piano.

There is no specific keyboard part in the trio sonata, only the figured bass part (continuo) which can be played on gamba or cello and any keyboard instrument.

Quote from: Mandryka
Just by the by the piece that seems to me "significantly different from Bach's  other keyboard works", or indeed anyone else's, is the solo keyboard movement in BWV 1019.

I agree very much with this.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Musical Offering BWV 1079
« Reply #125 on: July 25, 2019, 08:50:05 AM »
There is no specific keyboard part in the trio sonata, only the figured bass part (continuo) which can be played on gamba or cello and any keyboard instrument.



I never knew that -- I wonder what Tureck was talking about then.  She must have just got confused, but still that's surprising given she knew she was being recorded etc.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2019, 08:53:37 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Musical Offering BWV 1079
« Reply #126 on: October 17, 2019, 09:15:13 PM »


A particularly beautiful realisation by Gert Zacher of a score which is problematic to say the least. Very imaginative tempos and rubato, IMO natural and convincing; endings of canons are sometimes left "in the air", which is food for thought, but why not? Superb and clear live recording in the church or Niederehe in Eifel, the musicians are playing responsively. This is one of those recordings which give you a hint of what it was like to be at a pretty special concert.

What a pleasure it is to return to this recording for the first time in three years, it’s even more enjoyable than I had remembered.
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