Author Topic: The Romantics in Period Performances  (Read 127421 times)

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Offline Bunny

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #40 on: April 20, 2007, 07:53:05 PM »
Interesting, Bunny. For me, I would be interested to hear your take on Komen (I already know Wispelwey). He recorded a complete Beethoven Sonatas cycle on one of those "can't get 'em in America" labels, like Stradivarius or Globe, one of those. Anyway, I friend in Europe was very high on them. Kindly let us know what you think of him. :)

8)

Actually, they also paired up for Beethoven's Complete Sonatas for Pianoforte and Cello.   I like that recording very much, if not as much as Wispelwey's later recording of the same material with Dejan Lazic.  I haven't heard anything by Komen alone, but some of his fortepiano sonata recordings are available at Amazon now.   I haven't seen them reviewed anywhere, but I must admit they look very, very tasty.  Although the standard has been set very high by Ronald Brautigam, there aren't enough HIP Beethoven sonatas around so these are very welcome.  Btw, the website gives this information about the fortepiano he uses on the Last Sonatas: fortepiano by Conrad Graf, Vienna c. 1830 from the collection of Edwin Beunk, Enschede, the Netherlands.  He uses a different fortepiano for each of these recordings.  How much do you respect your friend's opinion?  Do you think it's worth taking the plunge on his word alone?  Perhaps Que know more about them... PAGING QUE...



George

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #41 on: April 21, 2007, 05:02:08 AM »
Actually, they also paired up for Beethoven's Complete Sonatas for Pianoforte and Cello.   I like that recording very much, if not as much as Wispelwey's later recording of the same material with Dejan Lazic.  I haven't heard anything by Komen alone, but some of his fortepiano sonata recordings are available at Amazon now.   I haven't seen them reviewed anywhere, but I must admit they look very, very tasty.  Although the standard has been set very high by Ronald Brautigam, there aren't enough HIP Beethoven sonatas around so these are very welcome.  Btw, the website gives this information about the fortepiano he uses on the Last Sonatas: fortepiano by Conrad Graf, Vienna c. 1830 from the collection of Edwin Beunk, Enschede, the Netherlands.  He uses a different fortepiano for each of these recordings.  How much do you respect your friend's opinion?  Do you think it's worth taking the plunge on his word alone?  Perhaps Que know more about them... PAGING QUE...

Here's a link:
Piano Sonatas: An Overview of Selected Recordings By Ron Drummond


He loves Komen's LvB (taken from the bottom of that link):

"The biggest find here, however, is Paul Komen. He's recorded three discs of Beethoven sonatas for Globe, a disc of the three Opus 31 sonatas, a disc of Opera 53, 54, & 57, and a disc of the last three sonatas, Opera 109-111. He uses a different fortepiano on each recording, and in each case one that is roughly contemporary with the dates of composition of the works in question. The man's amazing. I find in his playing an ideal balancing of the many positive but in some hands mutually exclusive qualities that are traditionally cited in discussions of piano performance. Komen is alive to the deepest implications of this music, and has the skill and the touch in spades to bring it out. All three discs are just urgently recommended."
« Last Edit: April 21, 2007, 05:04:00 AM by George »

Offline Bunny

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #42 on: April 21, 2007, 06:08:54 AM »
George, this is wonderful news! I have been considering Malcolm Bilson's Cornell cycle which is ruinously expensive, very uneven, and with uneven sound quality as well.  This cycle should be just the thing. :)

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #43 on: April 21, 2007, 07:12:43 AM »
George, this is wonderful news! I have been considering Malcolm Bilson's Cornell cycle which is ruinously expensive, very uneven, and with uneven sound quality as well.  This cycle should be just the thing. :)

Bunny,
Yes, I have a good amount of respect for my friend's opinion: he is the singularly most critical person I ever ran across, and he only listens to HIP (also only to Beethoven, but that's a different story). He says that the best Beethoven fortepiano cycle is Badura-Skoda on Astreé, which can't be had now, and Komen is the next best. At that time (2 years ago), the Komen disks weren't available here. Now that they are, might well be the time to check them out. :)

8)
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Offline Que

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #44 on: April 29, 2007, 06:38:22 AM »
I just got this recording of Brahms clarinet quintet with the London Haydn Quartet and Eric Hoeprich (Glossa).
For my post on the Mozart, click here.

This is a stunning, invigorating and heartfelt performance.
Hoeprich steals the show with a gorgeous instrument, a copy of Richard Mühlfeld's clarinet - the clarinetist for whom Brahms wrote the piece. It is a probing performance that combines vitality and elegance with the autumnal character of this piece.
Super! :) Recommended.



Q
« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 12:01:37 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline Bunny

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #45 on: April 29, 2007, 11:56:33 AM »
Que, this is very good to know!  Have you heard the Veilhan -- Quintette Stadler recording, and if so how do they compare?

Offline Que

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #46 on: April 29, 2007, 12:01:03 PM »
Que, this is very good to know!  Have you heard the Veilhan -- Quintette Stadler recording, and if so how do they compare?
No, I haven't heard that - unfortunately.
Although I'm very happy and satisfied with this one for the Brahms, I'm seriously tempted to get the one with Veilhan too! :)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Bunny

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #47 on: April 29, 2007, 12:12:21 PM »
Que, the Veilhan recording of the Brahms clarinet quintet is on the Mozart Clarinet quintet recording you posted in the Mozart thread!  Have you not listened to it yet?  I don't believe that Veilhan and the quintet would have recorded the same material again, and the label is also the same.




Offline Que

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #48 on: April 29, 2007, 12:18:54 PM »
Que, the Veilhan recording of the Brahms clarinet quintet is on the Mozart Clarinet quintet recording you posted in the Mozart thread!  Have you not listened to it yet?  I don't believe that Veilhan and the quintet would have recorded the same material again, and the label is also the same.

I pictured that because that is its present incarnation - I have a whole Mozart/clarinet box on K617 that includes the previous coupling with the clarinet concerto, conducted by Malgoire (which is not so hot btw). :)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Bunny

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #49 on: April 29, 2007, 12:38:52 PM »
I pictured that because that is its present incarnation - I have a whole Mozart/clarinet box on K617 that includes the previous coupling with the clarinet concerto, conducted by Malgoire (which is not so hot btw). :)

Q

Out of the box, which recordings would you recommend?  Is this the box set which you refer to?

« Last Edit: April 29, 2007, 12:40:27 PM by Bunny »

Offline Bunny

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #50 on: May 07, 2007, 10:13:13 AM »
Here's another great recording from L'Archibudelli: Schubert's Quintet in C major, D.956.  Very highly recommended! Unfortunately, a picture isn't available.


Offline Que

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #51 on: May 07, 2007, 09:05:59 PM »
Here's another great recording from L'Archibudelli: Schubert's Quintet in C major, D.956.  Very highly recommended! Unfortunately, a picture isn't available.

Hear, hear! Get moving everybody! ;D
And go here.

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Que

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #52 on: June 02, 2007, 04:31:00 AM »
I noticed this issue on fortepianist Bart van Oort's site.
Especially the complete Chopin nocturnes played by an excellent player like Bart on a Pleyel and a Erard looks very atttactive!

Somebody here knows and cares to comment on this one?
Thanks!  :)

Q



The Art of the Nocturne in the Nineteenth Century
Brilliant Classics 92202/1-2-3-4, December 2003.
CD I: John Field: Nocturnes.
Bart van Oort, fortepiano Broadwood 1823.
CD II: Chopin Nocturnes I
Bart van Oort, fortepiano Pleyel 1842.
Nocturnes op. 9, op 15, op. 32, op. 62, op. 72/1, op. posth c# minor
CD III: Chopin Nocturnes II
Bart van Oort, fortepiano Erard 1837.
Nocturnes op. 27, op. 37, op. 48, op. 55, op. posth c minor
CD IV: 19th century Nocturnes
Bart van Oort, fortepiano Erard 1837.
Nocturnes by Pleyel, Kalkbrenner, Clara Schumann, Lefèbure-Wély, E. Weber, Alkan, Glinka, Szymanowska, Dobrzynski.

« Last Edit: June 02, 2007, 04:42:14 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

lukeottevanger

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #53 on: June 02, 2007, 04:53:17 AM »
I noticed this issue on fortepianist Bart van Oort's site.
Especially the complete Chopin nocturnes played by an excellent player like Bart on a Pleyel and a Erard looks might atttactive!

Somebody here knows and cares to comment on this one?
Thanks!  :)

Q

The Art of the Nocturne in the Nineteenth Century
Brilliant Classics 92202/1-2-3-4, December 2003.
CD I: John Field: Nocturnes.
Bart van Oort, fortepiano Broadwood 1823.
CD II: Chopin Nocturnes I
Bart van Oort, fortepiano Pleyel 1842.
Nocturnes op. 9, op 15, op. 32, op. 62, op. 72/1, op. posth c# minor
CD III: Chopin Nocturnes II
Bart van Oort, fortepiano Erard 1837.
Nocturnes op. 27, op. 37, op. 48, op. 55, op. posth c minor
CD IV: 19th century Nocturnes
Bart van Oort, fortepiano Erard 1837.
Nocturnes by Pleyel, Kalkbrenner, Clara Schumann, Lefèbure-Wély, E. Weber, Alkan, Glinka, Szymanowska, Dobrzynski.



Not exaclty this set, but nearly - Brilliant released the first two discs (the Field and the first of the Chopin) a few years ago. I have it and like it very much, but, put it this way, I file it under Field, not under Chopin. I am an advocate of HIP, but there is a balance to be struck. I will tend to prefer HIP in repertoire where I feel a fine performance on the 'correct' instrument outweighs (for matters of musical enjoyment, not on a priggish historical basis) the benefits of a star performer playing a modern but inadequate instrument. But when we get to the realms of Chopin I don't think that is necessarily the case; the instruments are similar enough for the difference to make less difference, if you see what I mean, and so the interpretation becomes more of a factor. Which is as much as to say - Oort plays very beautifully, but he is outclassed by the obvious names.

However, there are interesting things to hear in this set, and the sound of the Pleyel is revealing indeed; I'm just spinning op 15/1 to remind myself; the sound is somewhat veiled and yet quite hard-edged; it's hard to tell if it's van Oort or his instrument who are missing the delicate poetry of the outer sections of this particular nocturne (which is why I chose it), but in the tumultuous inner section the clear and refined tone of the Pleyel scores a big plus - van Oort can really let rip, doesn't need to rein himself in, without fear of the r.h. semiquavers losing definition or becoming overwhelming.

Offline Bunny

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #54 on: June 02, 2007, 08:36:08 PM »
I noticed this issue on fortepianist Bart van Oort's site.
Especially the complete Chopin nocturnes played by an excellent player like Bart on a Pleyel and a Erard looks very atttactive!

Somebody here knows and cares to comment on this one?
Thanks!  :)


Q







I bought this a while ago for the Field more than for the Chopin.  I actually wanted just the Field set, but the price of the combined set was too good to pass up.  As I recall, the set was quite good both in terms of the playing and the instruments used, but I haven't listened to it in more than a year so I'll give it another spin.  It has the advantage of including all of Field's Nocturnes as well as works by other less well known composers and of course, Chopin's Nocturnes in one tidy set.  While lukevanottenger is correct when he states that van Oort may not be in the same class as Horowitz, Rubenstein and other Chopin specialists, his work is quite fine and the choice of instruments is very appropriate for the music.  I believe the set was well reviewed by classicstoday, but I may be mistaken about that.

Sound quality was excellent digital stereo, but not dsd.  I was quite pleased with the set and I also enjoyed the notes written by van Oort very much.

Offline Que

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #55 on: June 02, 2007, 10:05:22 PM »
Luke, Bunny, thank you both very much for your helpful comments! :)

I think I'm going to listen to some samples on the net to see if it's wothwhile - my primary interest would be the Chopin. I'm open to any other recommendations of HIP Chopin recordings! (Love the gorgeous sound of those Erards and Pleyels)

Q
« Last Edit: June 02, 2007, 10:14:34 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #56 on: June 03, 2007, 01:20:59 AM »
Try this



http://www.preludeklassiekemuziek.nl/stream/nov06_chopin_calliope_B.html

Janusz Olejniczak also recorded a few excellent HIP Chopin recordings for Opus 111.  Mazurkas, Polonaises, in addition to several mixed programs.  "At Home" from the label's Chopin series was also used as the OST for the film "La note bleu" in which Olejniczak plays Chopin himself  ;D  (Leonhardt starred as Bach himself in a film, too.  Never saw the film though.) Coin conducts the Larghetto from cto2.

Luc Devos also recorded all nocturnes for Ricercar.  But they may only be found used now I think.

BTW, obviously I like the Van Oort nocturnes a lot more than others do - his Mozart and Haydn is even better though.  Still, for those with less adventurous tastes, the Boegner set above may be a surer bet.   Beautifully recorded.
« Last Edit: October 27, 2008, 04:28:13 AM by Que »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline FideLeo

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #57 on: June 03, 2007, 01:55:05 AM »
HIP Liszt - Immerseel recorded the orchestral (and some concertante) works for Zigzag-Territories.  Has transparent sound for an orchestra of this size.  Dutch pianist Rian de Waal plays the solo part for the Totentanz.
Perhaps even more interesting are the four solo albums recorded by Thomas Hitzelberger.   The first two, on the Cybele label, are SACD's, but all four were recorded using the 1873 Steingraeber "Liszt-Klavier" now in Beyreuth.  The fourth, on the Ambroney label, has the b minor sonata, but the first one, with the Italian Annee de Pelerinage, is overwhelming in hi-res sound.   I rarely have any patience for Liszt on modern pianos, but this had me transfixed for over an hour (not even the bangings bothered me)!

« Last Edit: October 27, 2008, 04:28:58 AM by Que »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Que

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #58 on: June 03, 2007, 02:30:21 AM »
Try this



http://www.preludeklassiekemuziek.nl/stream/nov06_chopin_calliope_B.html

Janusz Olejniczak also recorded a few excellent HIP Chopin recordings for Opus 111.  Mazurkas, Polonaises, in addition to several mixed programs.  "At Home" from the label's Chopin series was also used as the OST for the film "La note bleu" in which Olejniczak plays Chopin himself  ;D  (Leonhardt starred as Bach himself in a film, too.  Never saw the film though.) Coin conducts the Larghetto from cto2.

Luc Devos also recorded all nocturnes for Ricercar.  But they may only be found used now I think.

BTW, obviously I like the Van Oort nocturnes a lot more than others do - his Mozart and Haydn is even better though.  Still, for owners of less adventurous tastes, the Boegner set above may be a surer bet.   Beautifully recorded.

fl.traverso, thanks for that! :)

That sample of the Chopin/ Boegner sounds bl***y marvelous. Not only the instrument but great playing as well. The combination makes for the most bubling and sparkling, fresh and crystal clear Chopin I've heard.

Should be mandatory listing for members who think it doesn't really matter if all music is played on a Steinway and that modern Steinways all sound the same....  8)

Q
« Last Edit: June 03, 2007, 02:50:05 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #59 on: June 03, 2007, 03:09:05 AM »

 (Leonhardt starred as Bach himself in a film, too.  Never saw the film though.)


This one Chronicle of AMB
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

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