Author Topic: The Romantics in Period Performances  (Read 127179 times)

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Offline Brian

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #580 on: July 24, 2015, 12:43:49 PM »
Yes I'd seen those but kind of passed over them because they're about Mozart.
She does talk about early vs. late Beethoven too, but the interview format was not such that we could really dive into every individual piece. I wish it were.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #581 on: July 24, 2015, 12:54:34 PM »
She does talk about early vs. late Beethoven too, but the interview format was not such that we could really dive into every individual piece. I wish it were.

I added some things to my post while you were typing that Brian!
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Offline Brian

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #582 on: July 24, 2015, 12:59:01 PM »
I added some things to my post while you were typing that Brian!
Oops!!

I didn't ask her about academic sources or teachings about period practice, but inferred from her answers that the resource she values most, when considering how to interpret a piece, is the instrument placed in front of her and patient study of what the instrument does best & how it feels under her hands.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #583 on: July 24, 2015, 01:20:17 PM »
Oops!!

I didn't ask her about academic sources or teachings about period practice, but inferred from her answers that the resource she values most, when considering how to interpret a piece, is the instrument placed in front of her and patient study of what the instrument does best & how it feels under her hands.

I got that impression too (I've read similar things from Ton Koopman)
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Online milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #584 on: July 24, 2015, 04:44:35 PM »
@ Mandryka, Brian and Gordo
Very interesting discussion here on Crawford.   

Offline Gordo

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #585 on: July 25, 2015, 06:10:05 AM »
Oops!!

I didn't ask her about academic sources or teachings about period practice, but inferred from her answers that the resource she values most, when considering how to interpret a piece, is the instrument placed in front of her and patient study of what the instrument does best & how it feels under her hands.

I hadn't read your interview with Crawford. It's excellent.

Your last reply recalled me an insightful response of the pianist and fortepianist Olga Tverskaya:

"My view is that the fortepiano is the only surviving witness of how Schubert's works actually sounded, and so it is the most reliable guide for my interpretations. By trusting the instrument entirely and never imposing upon it, I let it tell me which tempos and dynamics are most appropriate to the style of the piece I wish to play. With its enormous range of colours, its warm, singing, yet deep and powerful sound, the instrument itself gives vivid insight into the phrases, forms and contrasts as well as the atmospheres Schubert had in mind when composing. - - Because the instrument is so evocative, a strong sense of intimacy has grown up between me and the music Schubert wrote, to such an extent that I feel I am close to him, that he and I share feelings and thoughts with the listener."



http://www.musicalpointers.co.uk/reviews/cddvd/pianists.htm#tv


« Last Edit: September 22, 2015, 05:21:14 AM by Gordo »
Isn't it funny? The truth just sounds different.
-- Penny Lane, Almost Famous (2000)

Offline Brian

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #586 on: September 22, 2015, 04:41:25 AM »
Todd stumbled on this, cross-posting it here:





Bluthner piano 1856

Offline Wanderer

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #587 on: January 18, 2016, 01:10:09 AM »
.



Que asked me a while back and now that the disc has arrived (just now in fact!) I can answer: Kuijken plays on a 1868 J.B. Streicher pianoforte (No.6680).

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #588 on: January 19, 2016, 10:26:46 AM »
.



Que asked me a while back and now that the disc has arrived (just now in fact!) I can answer: Kuijken plays on a 1868 J.B. Streicher pianoforte (No.6680).

Ah I thought it didn't sound the same as the piano he used for Schumann, which was (I have been told)  an 1850 streicher.
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Offline Jeffrey Smith

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #589 on: August 18, 2016, 06:47:32 AM »
Listening to this

Piano Quintet in A "Trout" D 667
Sonata for Arpeggione and Piano in a minor D821
Adagio for Piano Trio in E Flat "Notturno" D897

This is a budget box, so no liner notes to explain the reasoning for the treatment of the fortepiano in the Sonata and Adagio.
Description of the fortepiano
Quote
Johann Nepomuk Troendlin,Leipzig
early 19th century (Viennese action)
restored by Jan van der Hemel, Antwerp, 1996
Sonata and Adagio played with the lid taken off,
but with a second soundboard
Tuned by Claire Chevallier
Anyone know why?

Offline Jo498

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #590 on: August 18, 2016, 10:00:15 AM »
I have the original single issue of that disk and there are two commentary texts (Bylsma and Robbins Landon) but there is no mentioning of the differently prepared piano in them.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Online milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #591 on: October 27, 2016, 05:52:50 AM »
I believe this is the third (and final?) disc in a, sort of, series. How are people finding it? How does the series (the trios) compare with Hugget's group or Atlantis? Any thoughts? A cursory listen to #3 leads me to believe Melnikov is a bit more lugubrious than Hugget - and less sharp angled. The mix is also less upfront. Comparing #1 on the new disc to Atlantis is a bit different too. Melnikov, Faust and Queyras hang together a bit more than Atlantis maybe. I love Crawford's sound but Mr. Schroder is not to everyone's taste. Seems like Melnikov and company are good when it comes to togetherness and they do create some nice drama without questionable intonation. Anyway, I'm enjoying it. I still wonder why more period groups don't tackle Dvorak's trio and piano quintet and quartet. 



Offline San Antonio

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #592 on: October 27, 2016, 06:40:32 AM »
I believe this is the third (and final?) disc in a, sort of, series. How are people finding it? How does the series (the trios) compare with Hugget's group or Atlantis? Any thoughts? A cursory listen to #3 leads me to believe Melnikov is a bit more lugubrious than Hugget - and less sharp angled. The mix is also less upfront. Comparing #1 on the new disc to Atlantis is a bit different too. Melnikov, Faust and Queyras hang together a bit more than Atlantis maybe. I love Crawford's sound but Mr. Schroder is not to everyone's taste. Seems like Melnikov and company are good when it comes to togetherness and they do create some nice drama without questionable intonation. Anyway, I'm enjoying it. I still wonder why more period groups don't tackle Dvorak's trio and piano quintet and quartet. 



Love the entire series of Brahms works and would assume their Schumann is just as good.

Offline bigfan2710

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #593 on: July 25, 2017, 01:48:27 PM »
Browsing the Anima Eterna/Immerseel discography (http://animaeterna.be/discografie/?lang=en) is interesting - a lot of late 19C works covered. They tackle, amongst others, Tchaikovsky's 4th symphony; the Symphonie Fantastique (a quick google comes up with fairly negative reactions to this one); Carmina Burana (!); an album of Rimsky-Korsakov (Sheherazade) and Borodin - this one particularly interests me; an album of Ravel; Pictures at an Exhibition; a Poulenc CD; and one of Debussy. There's also a HIP Johann Strauss album! Does anyone have any of these and can offer opinions? On paper it sounds like plenty of interesting stuff.

By the way, I love Gardiner's Planets.

Must Highly recommend Anima Aterna.  I have a number of their recordings.  Uniformly good. In particular Tchaikovsky 4, Sheherazade, Pictures at an exhibition and my favourite, the Ravel Album.....it even got me listening to Bolero properly all the way through!!!!!

Online milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #594 on: December 06, 2017, 05:34:53 AM »

Enjoying this tonight. I'm not sure these musicians made a splash in any other repertoire...Landgraf in particular hasn't recorded much else? I love her sound.

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