Author Topic: Paul Badura-Skoda  (Read 2143 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline LapsangS

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 34
Paul Badura-Skoda
« on: August 13, 2010, 03:49:22 AM »
He has recorded complete sets of Mozart, Beethoven and Schubert piano sonatas. I think they contain quite a few gems but too bad he is collector of old period instruments and almost every compact disc features a different fortepiano. While I like his playing and SOME of the instruments, there are quite a few pianos that sound absolutely horrible and out-of-tune. The playing is always always excellent though. The recordings were quite a revelation for me as before I found them, I had thought that nobody uses these old restored ones but only new copies. There are huge differences between different makers of old pianos as the instrument was under heavy development back then.

If he used the one and same fp like the Conrad Graf 1824 with which  he plays the Schubert Wanderer fantasy, or the Johann Schantz that he uses to play Mozart, I would gladly recommend his recordings as the No 1 choice for all these works. However, the piano issue makes it hard to recommend them as the sole choice. But as an addition to any serious piano sonata disc collection, they can truly broaden one's view on true, original period pianos and what they must have sounded like in the days of Mozart, Schubert and Beethoven.

Mr Badura-Skoda has also made some very nice recordings of Mozart Piano concertos and many other stuff. His discography is huge. Most of it is worth exploring. Warmly recommended.

Offline Gurn Blanston

  • Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 30692
  • Support your local Haydn Society
    • Gurn's Haydn Blog
  • Location: Texas, where else?
  • Currently Listening to:
    Haydn, I reckon.
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #1 on: August 13, 2010, 04:26:37 AM »
Yes, I have all 3 of those cycles, and several more single disks (I have 2 different cycles of Mozart). He is my favorite pianist of the period. As for the choice of instruments. while some of them aren't as clean sounding as others, I firmly believe that the sound is just what it was when the instruments were new. If you have any disks of Lubimov playing Beethoven (on Erato), you will note a similar sound from that piano, and if you have any of John Khouri's disks of Hummel or Clementi or Cramer, once again you will not have any trouble discerning that he isn't playing a Steinway! :)   I more or less consider the pianoforte's that are used by people like Brautigam or Immerseel to be "starter fortepianos", good for people who are trying to get used to the sound of older instruments. However, they certainly aren't representative of the majority of fortepianos. (I'm not talking about the players here, just the instruments). Most fortepianos don't/didn't sound like like a thin Bosendörfer! :D

8)
Help support GMG by purchasing from Amazon using this link

Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Follow me on Twitter @GurnBlanston106

Offline Sorin Eushayson

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 309
    • Classical Music Mayhem
  • Location: West Coast, USA
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #2 on: August 13, 2010, 05:09:46 AM »
I have the Beethoven and Mozart sets...  The Beethoven one is quite rare now.  I think a lot of the problems therein come from the audio, not the instruments.  In all I like his approach, though there are some decidedly spicier period fortepianists out there nowadays.

Offline Gurn Blanston

  • Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)
  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 30692
  • Support your local Haydn Society
    • Gurn's Haydn Blog
  • Location: Texas, where else?
  • Currently Listening to:
    Haydn, I reckon.
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #3 on: August 13, 2010, 05:46:29 AM »
I have the Beethoven and Mozart sets...  The Beethoven one is quite rare now.  I think a lot of the problems therein come from the audio, not the instruments.  In all I like his approach, though there are some decidedly spicier period fortepianists out there nowadays.

Yeah, it took me 8 years to put the complete Beethoven set together. Of course, readily available is his modern piano set (on a Bosendorfer Imperial, IIRC). Todd gave to a generally good rating which is the most you can ask from a modern set. No interest to me, of course... :)

Yes, not really spicy. However, spice is not always the way to go. Heavy spice, anyway...

8)

PS - Hey Sorin, nice to see you again. :)
Help support GMG by purchasing from Amazon using this link

Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Follow me on Twitter @GurnBlanston106

Offline sTisTi

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 62
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #4 on: August 13, 2010, 07:33:33 AM »
How about this disc?



It contains the following:
Keyboard Sonata in A flat major, H. 16/46
Andante with variations for piano in F minor, H. 17/6
Keyboard Sonata in C minor, H. 16/20
Variations for piano on the hymn 'Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser' (arrangement of string quartet Op. 76/3, 2nd mvt.)
Adagio for keyboard in F major, H. 17/9

Offline LapsangS

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 34
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #5 on: August 14, 2010, 01:12:40 AM »
that Haydn disc would be an interesting addition to my collection too :) The only "Haydn" sonatas I have from him are the famous fake sonatas issued on a KOCH CD:



Offline RJR

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 353
  • Location: Canada
  • Currently Listening to:
    Reading Robert Erickson's The structure of music
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #6 on: December 31, 2010, 08:34:25 PM »
Paul Badura-Skoda was my introduction to Mozart's piano music. I liked listening to Mozart with the headphones on while studying my French homework. Mozart won.

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8272
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2011, 12:15:15 AM »
I enjoyed Paul Badura-Skoda playing Mozart K332 quite recently.  The  recording on fortepiano. Stylish and passionate -- maybe not quite as supremely poetic as Lubimov at his best (like in K330) -- but in K332 rather more spontaneous than Lubimov in fact.

Another Mozart piece I liked a few weeks ago was the K454 with Oistrakh. Fun -- it sounded like a good partnership to me, but I'm no violin connoisseur.

Other times I've been less impressed. In Schumann's Etudes in the form of Variations on a theme by Beethoven (an early work without opus number)  he lets a median tone always dominate. That makes me bored. Sometimes I think he obscures too much the singing lines in the music -- especially when they are in the lower voices. I haven't heard him play the Symphonic Etudes but if this is anything to go by the result could be well nasty.

I got  one of his Schubert piano sonata  cycles just a few weeks ago -- the RCA one from the early 70s. I haven't heard any of it yet. Does anyone know it? Where does he really excel -- a good place for me to jump in? (and please don't say D960. I've had a bellyful of that music!)



« Last Edit: January 01, 2011, 12:16:47 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline George

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4921
  • Our DJ's Better Than All These Bands
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2017, 04:36:55 PM »
I got  one of his Schubert piano sonata  cycles just a few weeks ago -- the RCA one from the early 70s. I haven't heard any of it yet. Does anyone know it? Where does he really excel -- a good place for me to jump in? (and please don't say D960. I've had a bellyful of that music!)

Have you heard the set? How do you like it, on a whole? I know it has been re-released on CD.
"I can't live without music, because music is life." - Yvonne Lefébure

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8272
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2017, 08:59:55 PM »
Have you heard the set? How do you like it, on a whole? I know it has been re-released on CD.

Just one or two things at random, I'm not a great Schubertian really, I thought it sounded joyful and natural, full of life, light,  a pleasure to dip in to.

(I assume we're talking about the one on a modern piano.)
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Turner

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1066
  • Location: Europe
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2017, 09:42:24 PM »
Lots of early recordings from the 50s onwards not using historical instruments too, such as the Westminster label ones, including the Beethoven concertos with Scherchen (which I have most of) and the Bach Partitas (which I skipped). Those, though mostly representing middle of the road interpretations, would be the ones of interest to me, however I've kept the lively Beethoven 4th concerto played on a fortepiano with the Collegium Aureum orchestra - one of the early examples of orchestral  HIP releases in general (1974).
« Last Edit: October 09, 2017, 09:55:12 PM by Turner »

Offline Marc

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3054
  • Sine Cerere et Bach friget Venus
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2017, 11:29:29 PM »
Help support the GMG Classical Music Forum by purchasing from Amazon using this link, this link, or this link

Offline Turner

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1066
  • Location: Europe
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #12 on: October 09, 2017, 11:40:09 PM »
This is apparently in the pipeline.



https://www.amazon.com/Paul-Badura-Skoda-90th-Anniversary-20/dp/B073XCGB9Q/?tag=goodmusicguideco
Interesting, and a lot of the Westminster recordings there.
Lots of details on the DG website:
http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/gb/cat/4798065

I believe I´ve also got LPs with the Chopin concerti with Rodzinski, the Schubert 4hand piano works with Demus, and the Russian piano concerti disc, possibly more. But it would be interesting how DG has restored those olde mono recordings.

« Last Edit: October 10, 2017, 12:30:46 AM by Turner »

Offline George

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4921
  • Our DJ's Better Than All These Bands
Re: Paul Badura-Skoda
« Reply #13 on: October 10, 2017, 06:34:05 AM »
Just one or two things at random, I'm not a great Schubertian really, I thought it sounded joyful and natural, full of life, light,  a pleasure to dip in to.

(I assume we're talking about the one on a modern piano.)

Yeah, modern piano. I listened to some of it on Spotify and decided it wasn't my cup of tea.
"I can't live without music, because music is life." - Yvonne Lefébure

Buying Music From Amazon?
Please consider using these links. A small percentage of every sale using these links is passed on to GMG and helps keep this forum online.
Amazon US
Amazon Canada
Amazon UK