Author Topic: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008  (Read 7626 times)

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Offline snyprrr

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Re: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008
« Reply #60 on: September 26, 2015, 08:05:14 PM »
Actually the CD has symphonies 3 and 5 on rather than 4 and 5. The conductor is Sakari Oramo who coincidentally I saw conduct Mahler's Third Symphony in London last night. I have ever seen him before. I had forgotten that I had started this thread, albeit confusing Nordgren with a different composer  ::).
My impressions of the music, which I enjoyed, if that is the right word are very much the same as in my initial post in this thread. It is very dark and sombre but my attention was held throughout. The 3rd Symphony has two movements for piano only and quite a 'jazzy' movement entitled 'defiance'. The music is resolutely bleak but not unapproachable. It reminded me a bit of Norgard and Petterrson. Mahler and Sibelius tend to be seen as polar opposites in their approach to the symphony but at timed Nordgren reminded me of both although his music does not sound like either. There is, I believe, a strong sense of nature in both scores. The Fifth symphony has a most haunting and moving passage after about 18 minutes which I found moving. So, the music has both an intellectual and emotional appeal as far as I am concerned.

You had me at bleak!
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008
« Reply #61 on: September 26, 2015, 11:23:38 PM »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline snyprrr

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Re: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008
« Reply #62 on: November 01, 2015, 06:51:30 AM »
s these mysterious, close harmonies,... very inward,... thinking... icy,... dark green...


yea,... Nordgren... most of your Usual Suspects should find him captivating... MI??
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Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008
« Reply #63 on: December 01, 2016, 08:09:20 PM »
I have been listening to the available string quartets: 4, 5, 10, 11

I find them very good (5 has two movements, with the first an Epilogue, beat that!)

I hope Ondine plans to record 1-3, 6-9

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008
« Reply #64 on: December 02, 2016, 12:56:55 AM »
Actually I sent a message to Ondine and they told me that Alba is thinking of recording the remaining ones.

Whoo-hoo.

Offline André

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Re: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008
« Reply #65 on: February 11, 2017, 10:49:52 PM »
Actually the CD has symphonies 3 and 5 on rather than 4 and 5. The conductor is Sakari Oramo who coincidentally I saw conduct Mahler's Third Symphony in London last night. I have ever seen him before. I had forgotten that I had started this thread, albeit confusing Nordgren with a different composer  ::).
My impressions of the music, which I enjoyed, if that is the right word are very much the same as in my initial post in this thread. It is very dark and sombre but my attention was held throughout. The 3rd Symphony has two movements for piano only and quite a 'jazzy' movement entitled 'defiance'. The music is resolutely bleak but not unapproachable. It reminded me a bit of Norgard and Petterrson. Mahler and Sibelius tend to be seen as polar opposites in their approach to the symphony but at timed Nordgren reminded me of both although his music does not sound like either. There is, I believe, a strong sense of nature in both scores. The Fifth symphony has a most haunting and moving passage after about 18 minutes which I found moving. So, the music has both an intellectual and emotional appeal as far as I am concerned.

I know I have something by Nordgren back home, but being far away at the moment, I just can't figure what. Anyhow, I have an internet connection, so I listened to the 3rd symphony on Youtube (Oramo). Powerful stuff, bleak soundscape, Pettersson-influenced (a big brownie point for that). I like the fact it doesn't swamp the listener with "statements", something I often think Norgärd does.

I'll try to find something to buy by Nordgren this year. A preliminary survey shows his discs to be pricey though.

Online Turner

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Re: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008
« Reply #66 on: February 11, 2017, 11:24:10 PM »
..... A preliminary survey shows his discs to be pricey though.

Yes, a more systematic and ultimately inexpensive Nordgren Edition would certainly be very welcome.

Offline Rons_talking

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Re: Pehr Henrik Nordgren 1944-2008
« Reply #67 on: March 19, 2017, 08:18:37 AM »
Have been listening to Symphony 7 (2003) having recently received this CD. It is a most extraordinary score and I have played it through several times over the last few days. To me it is a searching and visionary work, which starts out very much in the spirit of Rautavaara. It is a very dark work, with sombre episode interspersed with folk type songs which reminded me of a British sea shanty! Charles Ives also came to mind with the seemingly bizarre juxtapositions of dissonant and lyrical material. I am delighted to have discovered this remarkable score and have not even got on yet to Nordgren's last symphony, the No.8 of 2006.


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/obituaries/pehr-henrik-nordgren-modernist-composer-who-incorporated-folk-music-into-his-work-and-relished-his-artistic-freedom-961316.html

i agree. I have noticed that Nordgren's post-Opus 100 works are more expressive in nature IMO. Symphony 7 really stands out as an outstanding work. Number 8 and the Oboe Concerto are also excellent...as are the late quartets. I'm glad I found his music on line.

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