Author Topic: Peter Eötvös, Hungarian Export  (Read 4278 times)

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Offline snyprrr

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Re: Peter Eötvös, Hungarian Export
« Reply #20 on: May 20, 2011, 06:37:41 AM »

Which CD is that?  The DG recording uses countertenors.  It's superb, but I must say that I'd rather listen to females.  (I'm not big on countertenors.)

Aside from Three Sisters, I've only heard his Replica, which is very good.  He's a superb conductor, too, and recorded my favorite take on Bluebeard's Castle.

3 Sisters is on Erato.
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Offline CRCulver

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Re: Peter Eötvös, Hungarian Export
« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2011, 10:04:48 AM »
3 Sisters is on Erato.

It's on Deutsche Grammophon, a recording in the label's "20/21" series.

Offline Brian

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Re: Peter Eötvös, Hungarian Export
« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2011, 10:46:15 AM »
Ah, since we've revived this thread I've got a chance to do a bit of reviving of my own. Here's a blog post I wrote in January...

Quote
The London Philharmonic Orchestra program last night opened with a UK premiere, “Shadows” by Peter Eötvös. It’s sort of a mini concerto for flute, clarinet, a percussionist with snare drum and suspended cymbal, and orchestra. It also calls for a bizarre orchestral layout in which some of the forces sit with their backs to the audience. Here’s a diagram:



I couldn’t figure out why the orchestra was asked to sit like this based on the music itself: to muffle the brass? To divide the strings really dramatically? Aside from placing the solo instruments literally in the center of the ring, there seemed to be no particular aural advantage to this. Since the performance was recorded for a CD, perhaps the CD experience will explain Eötvös’ decision.

As for the music itself: it fairly clearly was originally a chamber piece; the best movement was scored for flute and clarinet alone. At other points the orchestra interjected Scary Music chords, reminiscent of Jaws or film noir, and there were some interesting coloristic effects – neat sounds being produced by the ensemble as a whole or individual soloists. Still and all, I’m not entirely sure I could deduce from listening why Eötvös actually wrote the piece. My cynical guess is he had a nice chamber duet sitting around and fulfilled a commission by arranging it up (N.B. looking at his website, this guess is wrong; it was originally for the soloists plus a small wind ensemble and handful of strings). It achieved interesting colors and sounds but didn’t develop any sort of argument or even conversation.

Possibly this says as much about the listener as the listened.
« Last Edit: May 20, 2011, 10:47:51 AM by Brian »

karlhenning

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Re: Peter Eötvös, Hungarian Export
« Reply #23 on: May 20, 2011, 10:50:45 AM »
Extracted for Henningmusick-related emphasis:

Quote from: Brian
. . . the best movement was scored for flute and clarinet alone . . . .

Offline snyprrr

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Re: Peter Eötvös, Hungarian Export
« Reply #24 on: May 20, 2011, 11:26:25 AM »
It's on Deutsche Grammophon, a recording in the label's "20/21" series.

It must be the same performance repackaged. I do remember seeing it on Ebay (so, you know, it true! ;D). I am aware of the DG, so I must've subconsciously assumed. But, there is an Erato cd, a very early one, with the timing on the booklet cover if I remember correctly, and a very 'white' cover, I believe. Licensing,... ahhh. ::)
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Offline Octave

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Re: Peter Eötvös, Hungarian Export
« Reply #26 on: February 22, 2013, 01:51:12 AM »
Re: the Eotvos THREE SISTERS opera:

It's on Deutsche Grammophon, a recording in the label's "20/21" series.

I owned the 20-21 recording and had it basically stolen from me by an ungrateful borrower: will I never learn?
I see that there is a 2012 edition from Budapest Music Center, a licensed reissue of the DG.  Does anyone know about this BMC edition, i.e. does it come with libretto in some form?  The cover is pretty ugly, but the DG is only affordably available as a burn-to-order CDR from Arkiv.  Here's a link to the BMC reissue:



The web page for the BMC edition has a messy libretto in romanized (?) Russian, plus liner notes:
http://www.bmcrecords.hu/pages/tartalom/index_en.php?kod=190
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