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Offline Brian

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Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« on: August 20, 2013, 01:54:40 PM »
From some research I did in the British Library back in 2011, here's a trove of actual concert programs from 1818-19. There's a WEALTH of interesting observations here. I'll get us started with just one: many of these end with an overture.

-------
Amateur Concerts Society
(I believe most of these took place in tavern music rooms)

BL shelfmark C.61.h.2.(2.)

Amateur Concerts.
First Concert,
December 17th, 1818

Directors { Mr. A.D.L. Agassiz, Mr. J. Alewyn, Mr. T. Masterman, Mr. W. Sikes
The Music selected by Mr. J. Alewyn.

PART I.
Grand Sinfonia (never performed in this Country)………………André.
Scena, Miss GOODALL, “Deh! parlate!”…………………….Cimarosa.
Duetto, Mrs. DICKONS & Mr. BRAHAM, “Qual Anelante.” Marcello.
Aria, Mr. BRAHAM, “Deh per questio.” (La Clemenza di Tito) Mozart.
Scena, (MS.) Mrs. DICKONS, “Dolenti e care.”………………Bonfichi.
Finale to the First Act of Figaro…………………………………Mozart.

PART II.
Grand Sinfonia…………………………………………………Beethoven.
Scena (MS.) Mrs. DICKONS, “Caro oggetto.”………………Carlo Cocci.
Duetto, Miss GOODALL and Signore AMBROGETTI,
      “Quell’ occhietto.”……………………………..Fioravanti.
Cantata, Mr. BRAHAM, “Alexis;” accompanied on the
      Violoncello by Mr. LINDLEY………………Dr. Pepusch.
Aria, Signor AMBROGETTI, “Madamina.” (Il Don Giovanni.) Mozart.
Overture……………..(Anacreon.)…………………………….Cherubini.

Leader……………Mr. LODER.
Conductor………...Sir GEORGE SMART.

The Second Concert will be on Thursday, Jan. 7, 1819.

The Directors have to acquaint the Subscribers, that, in consequence of a Domestic Calamity, Mr. WEICHSEL is prevented fulfilling his Engagements at these CONCERTS: Mr. LODER (of Bath) is therefore engaged to lead alternately with Mr. SPAGNOLETTI.

J. Mallett, Printer to the Royal and Noble Directors of the Concerts of Ancient Music, 59, Wardour-street, Soho.












Amateur Concerts.
Second Concert,
January the 7th, 1819.

Directors.
Mr. H. Bacon, Mr. W. Bell,
Mr. A.J. Doxat, Mr. R. Stephenson
The Music selected by Mr. W. Bell.

PART I
Grand Sinfonia………………………………………………….Haydn.
Duetto, Mrs. DICKSONS and Mr. BRAHAM,
      “Come ti piace.”…(La Clemenza di Tito.)……..Mozart.
Recit. ed Aria, Miss GOODALL, “Ah se perdo.”……………..Naumann.
Recit. and Air, Mr. BRAHAM, “Waft her, Angels.” (Jephtha). Handel.
Scena e Duetto, Miss GOODALL and Signore AMBROGETTI,
      “Quel sepolcro.”………..(Agnese.)……………….Paer.
Recit. ed Aria, (MS.) MRs. DICKONS, “Non vi scordate”…….Gnecco.
Sestetto, Mrs. DICKONS, Miss GOODALL, Master TURLE,
      Mr. BRAHAM, Mr. MULLINEX, and Signor AMBROGETTI,
      “Sola, sola,”…………..(Il Don Giovanni)………..Mozart.

PART II
Grand Sinfonia………………………………………………….Beethoven.
Air, Mrs. DICKONS, “Tyrant soon” (The Barber of Seville.)……..Rossini.
Terzetto, Miss GOODALL, Signore AMBROGETTI, and
      Mr. BRAHAM, “Cosa sento.”….(Figaro.)………….Mozart.
Recit. ed Aria (MS.) Signor AMBROGETTI,
      “I Violini Tutti assieme.” (La Contadina in Corte.) Sacchini.
Overture………………….(Zauberflote.)…………………………..Mozart.

Leader…………..Mr. SPAGNOLETTI.
Conductor……….Sir GEORGE SMART.

The Third Concert will be on Thursday, Jan. 21, 1819.

same printing notice









Amateur Concerts.
Third Concert,
January the 21st, 1819.

Directors.
Mr. J. Cazenove, jun.  Sir C. Price, Bart.
Mr. W.R. Robinson,   Mr. T. Solly,
The Music selected by Mr. J. Cazenove, jun.

PART I
Grand Sinfonia……………………………………..}
Aria (MS.) Signor ANGRISANI, “Non piu tacete.”}……Mozart.
Cantata, Miss GOODALL, “Non temer.”…………}
        Piano Forte Obligato, Sir GEORGE SMART.}
Septetto—Violin, Mr. LODER, Viola, Mr. CHALLONER,
   Violoncello, Mr. LINDLEY, Bass, Mr. DRAGONETTI,
   Clarionet, Mr. WILMAN, Bassoon, Mr. HOLMES,
   and Horn, Mr. TULLY……………………….Beethoven.
Aria, Mrs. SALMON, “Dove sei.”…….(Rodelinda.)…..Handel.
Duetto (MS.) Miss GOODALL and Signor BEGREZ,
   “Vieni segui.”…………………(Indiani.)……….Nasolini.
Recit. ed Aria, Miss STEPHENS, “Dove sono.”…(Figaro.) Mozart.
Finale to the First Act of Cosi fan Tutte; Mrs. SALMON,
   Mrs. HUNT, Miss GOODALL, Signors BEGREZ,
   AMBROGETTI, and ANGRISANI……………….Mozart.

PART II.
Grand Sinfonia……………………………………………Beethoven.
Recit ed. Aria, Mrs. SALMON, “Tu ch’ accendi.”………….Rossini.
Quartetto (MS.) Miss GOODALL, Signor BEGREZ, Signor
   AMBROGETTI, and Signor ANGRISANI; “Chi brama.” Caruso.
Recit. & Air, Miss STEPHENS, “Hush, ye pretty.” (Acis & Gal.) Handel.
         Flageolet Obligato, Mr. SHARP.
Duetto (MS.) Signor ANGRISANI and Signor AMBROGETTI;
   “Do, re, me, fa.”……………………………Weigl and Liverati.
Overture………………………………………………………Romberg.

Leader………………Mr. LODER.
Conductor…………..Sir GEORGE SMART.

The Fourth Concert will be on Thursday, Feb. 4, 1819.





AMATEUR CONCERT
Fourth Concert,
February the 4th, 1819.

Directors.
Mr. G.C. Glyn,  Mr. J.B. Heath,
Mr. C.J. Lyon,  Mr. W. May.
The Music selected by Mr. J.B. Heath.

PART I
SELECTIONS from IL DON GIOVANNI………………………Mozart.
   Overture.
   Introduzione, Miss GOODALL, Signors BEGREZ, AMBROGETTI,
      and ANGRISANI, “Notte e giorno.”
   Duetto, Miss GOODALL and Signor BEGREZ, “Fuggi crudele.”
   Aria, Madame GEORGI BELLOCHI, “Vedrai carino.”
   Duetto, Mrs. SALMON and Signor ANGRISANI, and
      Chorus, “Giovinette che fate all’amore.”
   Aria, Signor BEGREZ, “Il mio tesoro.”
   Duetto, Miss GOODALL and Signor AMBROGETTI, “La ci darem.”
   Aria, Signor AMBROGETTI, “Fin ch’han dal vino.”
   Aria, Mrs. SALMON, “Batti, batti;”
         Violoncello Obligato, Mr. LINDLEY.
   Finale to the First Act—Mrs. SALMON, Miss GOODALL,
      Madame GEORGI BELLOCHI, Signors AMBROGETTI, BEGREZ,
      ANGRISANI, and Mr. ROVEDIN
  • .


PART II
Grand Sinfonia, (MS)………………………………………….Ries.
Air, with new Variations, Mrs. SALMON,
         “My lodging is on the cold ground.”
Quintetto, Violini, Mr. SPAGNOLETTI and Mr. WATTS,
   Viole, Mr. CHALLONER and Mr. R. ASHLEY, and
   Violoncello, Mr. LINDLEY……………………….Beethoven.
Duetto, Miss GOODALL and Signor AMBROGETTI,
   “Con Pazienza,”……………………………………….Mayer.
Cavatina, Madame GEORGI BELLOCHI, “Di piacer.”…….Rossini.
Duetto, Signors AMBROGETTI and ANGRISANI,
   “Se fiato in corpo avete.”…(Il Matrimonio Segretto.) Cimarosa.
Overture to Les Deux Journées………………………………Cherubini.

Leader, Mr. SPAGNOLETTI. Conductor, Sir GEORGE SMART.
The Fifth Concert will be on Thursday, Feb. 18, 1819.
[no printer notice]
AMATEUR CONCERT,
Fifth Concert,
FEBRUARY the 18th, 1819.

Directors.
Mr. A.D.L. Agassiz,   Mr. W.R. Robinson,
Mr. G. Rougemont,    Mr. Schneider,
The Music selected by Mr. G. Rougemont.

PART I.
Grand Sinfonia…………………………………………………}
Quartetto, Miss GOODALL, Signors BEGREZ, ROVEDINO,}...Mozart.
   and ANGRISANI, “Ah! grazie si rendano.” (Tito.)……}
Aria, Signor ANGRISANI, “La vendetta.”……(Figaro.)……..}
Aria (MS.) Miss GOODALL, “Una voce al cor mi parla.”
   Clarinet Obligato, Mr. WILLMAN………………………..Paer.
Overture…………………(Fidelio.)……………………………Beethoven.
Terzetto, Miss GOODALL, Signors AMBROGETTI and
   ANGRISANI, “Ah taci ingiusto core.” (Il Don Giovanni.) Mozart.
Aria, with new Variations, Mrs. SALMON, “O dolce concento.”
   Flute Obligato, Mr. IRELAND.
Finale to the Second Act of Il Don Giovanni—Mrs. SALMON,
   Miss GOODALL, Miss BETTS, Signors AMBROGETTI, BEGREZ,
   ANGRISANI, and. Mr. ROVEDINO………………………Mozart.

PART II.
Grand Sinfonia…………………………………………………….Beethoven.
New Ballad, Mrs. SALMON, “Ah! see the pale lily.”………………Embdin.
Quintetto, Mrs. SALMON, Miss GOODALL, Signors BEGREZ,
   ROVEDINO, and ANGRISANI; “Sent oh Dio!”
   (Cosi fan Tutte)………………………………………………Mozart.
Duetto, (by Desire,) Miss GOODALL and Signor AMBROGETTI,
   “Quell’ occhietto.”…………………………………….Fioravanti.
Overture……………………(Figaro.)……………………………….Mozart.

Leader, Mr. SPAGNOLETTI. Conductor, Sir GEORGE SMART.

The Sixth Concert will be on Thursday, March 4, 1819.

The DIRECTORS have to acquaint the Subscribers, that, in consequence of the severe illness of Mr. LODER, he is prevented leading this Concert; Mr. SPAGNOLETTI has therefore consented to lead.




AMATEUR CONCERT,
Sixth Concert,
March the 4th, 1819.

Directors.
Mr. H. Bacon,   Mr. J.O. Hanson,
Mr. W. Sikes,   Mr. F. Townsend, jun.
The Music selected by Mr. F. Townsend, jun.

PART I.
Grand Sinfonia…………………………………………………………Mozart.
Motett, Miss GOODALL, Mr. BRAHAM, & Sig. ANGRISANI. A. Romberg.
Recit. & Air, Mrs. SALMON, “With verdure clad.” (Creation.) ……Haydn..
Quintetto—Piano Forte, Mr. RIES; Violin, Mr. LODER;
   Viola, Mr. WATTS; Violoncello, Mr. LINDLEY; and
   Double Bass, Mr. DRAGONETTI……………………………….Ries.
Recit. ed Aria, Mr. BRAHAM, “Segui il tuo sposo amante;”
   Violin and Violoncello Obligati, Messrs. LODER & LINDLEY. Paer.
Scena, Miss GOODALL, “Non piu di fiori;” }
    Clarinet Obligato, Mr. WILLMAN. (Tito.)}……………………….Mozart.
Finale to La Clemenza di Tito………………}

PART II.
Grand Sinfonia, (by desire, performed at the Second Concert.)…….Beethoven.
Aria, Mrs. SALMON, “Riedi agli amplessi.”…………………………Liverati.
Sestetto, Mrs. SALMON, Miss GOODALL, Mrs. HUNT,
   Mr. BRAHAM, Signors AMBROGETTI and ANGRISANI,
   “Alla bella Despinatta.”………(Cosi fan Tutte)……………….Mozart.
Recit. and Air, Mr. BRAHAM, “The Snow Storm.” (Seasons.)………Haydn.
Aria, Signor AMBROGETTI, “Sei Morelli.”………………………….Cimarosa.
Overture to Ulysse et Circe………………………………………B. Romberg.

Leader………………Mr. LODER.
Conductor…………..Sir GEORGE SMART.

The DIRECTORS beg leave to announce their intention of undertaking the management of a similar Series of Concerts in the course of next Winter, of which further notice will be given.

----

First Concert from the next year (16 Dec 1819): Grand Military Symphony (Haydn), Terzetto “La solitudine” (Attwood), Aria “Non piu di fiori” from Clemenza di Tito, Duetto “E ben per mia memoria” from La Gazza Ladra, Beethoven’s Septet, Aria “pria che spunti” from Il Matrimonio Segretto by Cimarosa, Finale to First Act of Don Giovanni; BREAK; Beethoven’s 5th; Duet “Vederlo sol bramo” from Paer’s Griselda; “Infelice sconsolata” from “Il Flauto Magico” [!!], Terzetto “Si diro che siete un orso” from Paer’s Agnese, Sonata by Corelli, Scene “In imitation of a fanatical Composer giving Directions to an Orchestra on the first Rehearsal of his new Composition,” by Gnecco, then Mozart’s Magic Flute overture.

Offline Brian

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2013, 01:57:34 PM »
London Subscription Concerts
(a different series of concerts mounted by different sponsors. By the way I preserved all the original spelling)


From a letter written 5 March 1818

“It must be evident to the Subscribers that many errors in calculation, &c. must unavoidably attend the commencement of such an undertaking as the present, these errors have now become evident, and can be guarded against in future. The Committee had been led to believe that the Concert Room would conveniently accommodate 700 persons, and they founded their calculations of expence, &c. accordingly, it is now found on trial that their information was incorrect, by no less a number than 150; the room not being calculated to contain more than 550; this circumstance compels the Committee either to curtail the number of Concerts, or to give the remaining three on a less extensive scale than those already given. They conceive that they are but consulting the wishes of the Subscribers in general, by adopting the former. It is therefore intended to have but seven Concerts, which will enable the Committee to give the remainder in an equal, if not a superior, manner to those already performed; and here the Committee beg to observe that had the information they received from those best calculated to judge been correct, as to the accommodating capacity of the Concert Room, no curtailment of the intended number of Concerts need have taken place, as many Subscriptions have been declined from the impossibility of affording accommodation to a greater number than that already mentioned.”

Advert: “The Concerts will be Six, To be given on alternate MONDAYS (as heretofore), at The London Tavern, Bishopsgate Street. The First is intended to take place on the 4th of January, 1819. Terms of Subscription for the Season: 2l 12s 6p for a Single Admission;--4l 14s 6p for Two;--or 6l 6s 0p for Three Admisions.”

Offline Brian

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2013, 02:02:11 PM »
PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY VOLS. Collected by Sir George Smart
1st season, 1813: “300 Subscribers and 40 in the Families of Members and Associates.
30 Members including 7 direcots
62 Associates”

“The Concerts were at the Argyll Rooms, under the patronage of The Prince Regent”

from the first announce of the Philharmonic Society, 1813: “the hope that, persevering exertions may yet restore to the world, those compositions which have excited so much delight, and re-kindle in the public mind, that taste for excellence in Instrumental Music, which has so long remained in a latent state.”
Laws of the Philharmonic Society: “I. The primary object of the PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY is the encouragement of the superior branches of Music, by the establishment of a Concert, and combining therein the highest talents that can be procured, for the purpose of forming a full and complete Orchestra.”

Nov. 28th, 1820: “Several complaints having been made, during the last season, of the very crowded state of the Room; and it being the anxious desire both of the Directors and the Society at large to render every accommodation in their power, it has been determined that the first fifty vacancies which may occur after the above-mentioned day [18th Jan], shall not be filled up, in order that the number of Subscribers admitted for the next season may be reduce to Six Hundred and Fifty.

1st season, 1813: Philharmonic Society. List of Subscribers.
His Royal Highness the Prince Regent. His Royal Highness the Duke of Cumberland. His Royal Highness the Duke of Sussex. His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge.
Bolingbroke, the Viscount [+Viscountess]. Leith, Liet. Gen. Sir James. Pomfret, the Earl of. Shaftesbury, the Earl of. Spencer, the Earl [+Countess].
But the overwhelming majority are normal people; there’s even a Mr. and Mrs. Jones. There are also quite a few single women: Miss Upton, Miss Rowsell, Miss Chester.

Second season: subscribers went from 340 to 483. 488. 1816: 535. 531. 539. 550. Duke of Devonshire joined (S2), Duke of Leeds (S2).
1820: 750 (!), Prince Regent becomes “His Majesty.” Mr. and Mrs. Jones are still there. Major-General Egerton.

[below, the quotation marks = handwritten notes by conductor Sir George Smart, in pencil or pen]

Beethoven’s Sinfonia in C minor was such a hit they played it on 30 March 1818 and again on 8 June 1818. In 1827 it was 31 M. In 1826, “Slow movement Enc’d”
1827: Weber overture, Der Beherrscher der Geister, “Encored” as well as the “2/4 movement” of Beethoven’s Eighth
5th of May, 1823. Sinfonia Pastorale – Beethoven. “32 M. No repeats.”
March 23, 1829: Sinfonia Pastorale – Beethoven. “All through but no repeats 32 ½ minutes.”

Concert Rooms.
From 1813 to 1829 at The Argyll Rooms
From 1830 to 1832 at The Concert Room in the Opera House, Haymarket
From 1833 to [blank] at The Hanover Sq Rooms

Offline North Star

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2013, 02:03:21 PM »
From some research I did in the British Library back in 2011, here's a trove of actual concert programs from 1818-19. There's a WEALTH of interesting observations here. I'll get us started with just one: many of these end with an overture.

After the overture, the concert is over.
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Offline Cato

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2013, 02:24:48 PM »
Many thanks to Brian

Fascinating to see composers now (basically?) unknown (Gnecco, Paer, Cocci, etc.) rubbing elbows with Mozart and Handel and Beethoven!

Interesting also to realize that Beethoven was a "contemporary composer" at the time.
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kishnevi

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #5 on: August 20, 2013, 05:15:06 PM »
Most interesting and intriguing.   Any indications of the exact identity of the grand sinfonias by Beethoven and Mozart were included on those 1818-19 concerts?

Offline Brian

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #6 on: August 20, 2013, 06:04:39 PM »
Most interesting and intriguing.   Any indications of the exact identity of the grand sinfonias by Beethoven and Mozart were included on those 1818-19 concerts?
None whatsoever - which I find [frustrating and] fascinating! In our age, we see a concert program and say, "I need to go, it's Beethoven's Seventh," but in 1818, when Beethoven had composed 8 symphonies and Mozart his full 40+, they felt no need to specify which was being performed. I wonder if this had to do with the fact that these concerts were the only way to hear works: you can imagine a listener reading an advertisement for "Grand Sinfonia No. 7" and saying, "Bah, I've heard that one already - still don't know what No. 4 is like at all, why can't they play that?" But on the other hand, hearing a Beethoven symphony was such a rare occasion with no CDs available that the composer's name alone may have sufficed.

EDIT: And then there's the obvious implication that purely instrumental music is second-class. After all, the vocal works don't say "Aria....Mozart," they list the opera and even the aria's name, along with every singer!
« Last Edit: August 20, 2013, 06:08:35 PM by Brian »

Offline Brian

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2013, 06:13:06 PM »
excerpts...

The By-Laws of the Musical Society, at the Castle-Tavern, in Pater-Noster-Row.
By-Law Six. “The President for the time being shall appoint the Musick to be performed each Night; shall keep the Keys of the Musical Books and Instruments, and be at the Concert before six of the Clock, on Forfeiture of Two Shillings and Six-pence, unless hindered by Sickness, or other sufficient Cause.”
By-Law Seventeen. “Every Performer shall provide his own Instrument, (except the Harpsichord and Double Bass,) and shall play in the Concert on the same Instrument which he play’d on for his Approbation [audition], and on no other, unless such Member is afterwards approved on again by the Performers on such other Instrument as he desires to play on; or unless he be desired by the President, or first Fiddle for the Night, to play on some other Instrument, under the Penalty of Five Shillings for each Night he shall offend as aforesaid.”
By-Law Nineteen. “Every Member who does not seat himself before the Musick begins, shall forfeit One Shilling.”
By-Law Twenty-One. “If any Member speak aloud, clap, hiss, or make other loud Noise, at, or during, the Performance, he shall forfeit Two Shillings and Sixpence.”
By-Law Twenty-Seven. “The Gallery and Box in the Concert-Room shall be reserved for Ladies only to be admitted by the Society’s Tickets; and no Member shall remain in the Gallery, or converse with the Ladies in the Box, during the Performance, on the Forfeiture of Five Shillings.”
By-Law Twenty-Eight. “Two Tickets for Ladies shall be delivered each Concert-Night by the Steward for the Month, to thirty-two Members by Seniority; and the President and Steward for the Month shall be allowed each Night two Tickets.
By-Law Thirty-One. “The officiating Steward shall provide a sufficient Refreshment of Wine for the Members between the Acts, and take care that the House-Bill do not exceed in any Night, the Sum of Four Pounds, on Penalty of his paying the Overplus; and no Person but the Steward shall call for Wine on the Society’s Account, on the Forfeit of Ten Shillings.”
« Last Edit: August 20, 2013, 06:16:59 PM by Brian »

Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #8 on: August 20, 2013, 07:13:30 PM »
you can imagine a listener reading an advertisement for "Grand Sinfonia No. 7" and saying, "Bah, I've heard that one already - still don't know what No. 4 is like at all, why can't they play that?" But on the other hand, hearing a Beethoven symphony was such a rare occasion with no CDs available that the composer's name alone may have sufficed.

Also, when did it become normal to designate works by numbers? Nowadays we all know what "Beethoven's 5th" is, but apparently audiences in his time knew it as the "[Grand?] Symphony in C Minor."
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Offline Cato

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2013, 05:00:32 AM »

EDIT: And then there's the obvious implication that purely instrumental music is second-class. After all, the vocal works don't say "Aria....Mozart," they list the opera and even the aria's name, along with every singer!

Yes, and concerning one of those Italian composers mentioned, Francesco Gnecco, a modest amount of information on him can be found in Italian on Wikipedia.

Otherwise, the Oxford Grove Music dictionary has this:

Quote
(b Genoa,c 1769; d Milan, 1810/11). Italian composer. He was maestro di cappella of Savona Cathedral for a time and wrote sacred and chamber music, but was most famous for his 25 operas, notably La prova d′un opera seria (1805, Milan), a comedy with a backstage plot.

Read more: http://www.answers.com/topic/francesco-gnecco#ixzz2cc3qOIkA
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Online Sergeant Rock

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #10 on: August 21, 2013, 08:29:35 AM »
By-Law Twenty-Seven. “The Gallery and Box in the Concert-Room shall be reserved for Ladies only to be admitted by the Society’s Tickets; and no Member shall remain in the Gallery, or converse with the Ladies in the Box, during the Performance, on the Forfeiture of Five Shillings.”

That must've cramped a few rakes' styles  ;D

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #11 on: August 21, 2013, 09:40:40 AM »
I wish I could go back in time and attend those concerts.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #12 on: August 21, 2013, 09:41:28 AM »
As long as I don't stay stuck back there, I'd go along for fun.
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DavidW

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #13 on: August 21, 2013, 09:42:37 AM »
As long as I don't stay stuck back there, I'd go along for fun.

David and Karl's excellent adventures! 8)

Offline jochanaan

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2013, 04:54:01 PM »
David and Karl's excellent adventures! 8)
Can I come too?  ;D

The programs are much more "variety-show" than is now typical at classical concerts.  I have read that Felix Mendelssohn was actually responsible for showing "the way to the future" in classical concerts by emphasizing a few big pieces rather than many smaller ones.  (Trivia: Mendelssohn hated applause between movements!  That's why so many of his pieces have those lovely transitions between movements. ;D)
Imagination + discipline = creativity

DavidW

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2013, 06:09:50 PM »
Well I suppose we can forgive Mendelssohn, since he did write some great music...

Offline Todd

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Re: Concert programs in London, 1818-19
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2013, 06:09:59 PM »
(Trivia: Mendelssohn hated applause between movements!  That's why so many of his pieces have those lovely transitions between movements. ;D)



Can't say that I blame him.
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