Author Topic: Haydn's Haus  (Read 544358 times)

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Online Jo498

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Re: Haydn's Haus
« Reply #10980 on: July 12, 2016, 06:48:08 AM »
Bernstein's Paris set is very good unless one insists on a lean HIP or proto-HIP style. It has some faults (like being string dominated) but it's very dramatic and expressive. The 83 g minor and the slow movement of the 86 are among my favorites, the 85 is probably not lithe and elegant enough but overall it seems obvious that Lenny cared about the music. They are individual and energetic, if for today's ears sometimes unconventional readings. (I do not know his London set well enough to comment.)

It's been a while but I have over the years listened to about 10 complete and partial recordings of the Paris symphonies and if I could keep three, they would probably be Bernstein's (the only "big band"), Harnoncourt's (the most colorful and original but sometimes also irritating) and Marriner's. Marriner is very elegant, fleet and supreme in the "lighter" ones (84, 85, 87).

But admittedly I have not heard other "big band" contenders, namely Ansermet, Dutoit and Karajan (I think they are the only "important" sets of this music I have not heard). In my experience, Bernstein is most frequently recommended among those. I have heard Dorati and Fischer and Bernstein is clearly superior. The others were all HIP or chamber, in addition to the one's mentioned: Brüggen, Kuijken, Weil, Wolff, Fey and Goodman (82-84).
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Daverz

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Re: Haydn's Haus
« Reply #10981 on: July 12, 2016, 06:25:30 PM »
So, you really think Bernstein was a good interpreter of Haydn?

Hell, yes.  Get the box!


Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Haydn's Haus
« Reply #10982 on: July 12, 2016, 07:48:21 PM »
Hey, Gurn,

Perhaps you can help me. During your years of wonderful research on Haydn, what have you come across regarding the use of harpsichord/pianoforte in his symphonies? Mostly, how was the keyboard normally utilized in the performances of his works, in his era?

I thought of this a few months ago when I listened to three different recordings in a row of the same symphony. Just curious if you touched upon this area yet.
Thanks in advance, Gurn!

Online karlhenning

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Re: Haydn's Haus
« Reply #10983 on: July 13, 2016, 03:31:03 AM »
(* stands by for THE REVEAL *)
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Gurn Blanston

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Re: Haydn's Haus
« Reply #10984 on: July 13, 2016, 09:37:37 AM »
Hey, Gurn,

Perhaps you can help me. During your years of wonderful research on Haydn, what have you come across regarding the use of harpsichord/pianoforte in his symphonies? Mostly, how was the keyboard normally utilized in the performances of his works, in his era?

I thought of this a few months ago when I listened to three different recordings in a row of the same symphony. Just curious if you touched upon this area yet.
Thanks in advance, Gurn!

Hey, Greg,

I'm off at a convention right now, when I get in tonight I'll take a stab at it. There is no one definitive answer, it varies over time, but it's an interesting story. :)

8)


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Online Jo498

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Re: Haydn's Haus
« Reply #10985 on: July 13, 2016, 09:53:41 AM »
I seem to recall that there is a scholarly dispute whether a harpsichord played in the Eszterhazy orchestra. Webster? who wrote the notes for the Hogwood series is adamant that there should be no keyboard in the early symphonies because there was no harpsichordist on the payroll and apparently Haydn led from the violin. (A bit of evidence is that the "Farewell" closes with two violins, presumably played by Haydn and Tomasini.)
But Zaslaw and others strongly disagree as far as I remember. Roy Goodman seems to disagree as well as the keyboard can be quite prominent in his recordings whereas it usually is fairly discrete if used at all (e.g. by Pinnock in his Sturm&Drang set).
 
There seems evidence that Haydn led from a keyboard in London and the little solo in the finale of #98 is another bit of evidence for that.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Scion7

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Re: Haydn's Haus
« Reply #10986 on: July 14, 2016, 05:22:24 AM »
(* stands by for THE REVEAL *)

With an introduction something along the lines of:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZAxKPPbiGQ

 :)
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Online karlhenning

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Re: Haydn's Haus
« Reply #10987 on: July 14, 2016, 11:25:22 AM »
Of tangential interest here:

My one Amazon Prime Day indulgence:



Quote from: Wikipedia
The series has 26 episodes. Producer Jeremy Isaacs asked Noble Frankland, then director of the Imperial War Museum, to list fifteen main campaigns of the war and devoted one episode to each. The remaining eleven episodes are devoted to other matters, such as the rise of the Third Reich, home life in Britain and Germany, the experience of occupation in the Netherlands, and the Nazis' use of genocide. Episode 1 begins with a cold open describing the massacre at the French village of Oradour-sur-Glane by the Waffen SS. The same event is referenced again at the end of Episode 26, while the Dona nobis pacem (Latin for "Grant us peace") from the Missa Sancti Nicolai, composed by Joseph Haydn, can be heard. The series ends with Laurence Olivier uttering the poignant word, "Remember".
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://henningmusick.blogspot.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

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