Author Topic: Claudio Monteverdi  (Read 33616 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 15334
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #40 on: December 08, 2007, 04:40:34 AM »
Have listen to it this morning, sampling key parts in it, and had to pull myself out, to get to my operettas.... ;D

Appreciate it, Harry!   :)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Drasko

  • Guest
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #41 on: December 08, 2007, 06:09:56 AM »
Drasko was so kind to send me his impressions on Garrido's L'Orfeo (left) some time ago.
I hope he doesn't mind me posting it. Thanks again, Drasko! :)

Q

No, I don't mind but what you forgot to say is that it isn't very informed or learned opinion. Italian and French baroque are relatively recent interests of mine where I'm mostly just dabbling. More like an impression than serious review.

Anyhow, I got Alessandrini's L'Orfeo in the meantime. It is definitely more dramatic and exciting but less overtly beautiful reading than Garrido's. Alessandrini's tempos are generally faster and more dance like (at least in ritornelli) but flexible enough in the slow sections. Orchestra and chorus sound sparser and brasher, orchestra more harpsicord dominated and not nearly as lush as Garrido's, for example Garrido's regale (as accompaniment for Caronte's aria) sounds like true organ while Alessandrini's sounds more like massed kazoos. High point of Alessandrini's recording, for me, is Furio Zanasi as Orfeo. He is superb vocal actor, conveying from joyfulness through grief, hope and finaly resignation with gripping belief. Very beautiful voice as well (billed as tenor but more like a baritone to my ears). Rest of the cast is very good  but there are some strange (to me at least) casting choices. Doubling roles is ok but while I find Sara Mingardo fabulous as Messaggiera, I feel she is to dark and ominous for Speranza and the choice that same singer (Anna Simboli) sings both Proserpina and Euridice makes fourth act somewhat awkward. But again, these are merely quibbles, it is very convincing, superb performance and imo perfect foil to Garrido.

I see that La Venexiana recording is currently cheap from US, so that might be my next stop, or perhaps Jacobs.

Offline Bogey

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13488
  • Location: Colorado
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #42 on: December 08, 2007, 06:55:51 AM »

Have listen to it this morning, sampling key parts in it, and had to pull myself out, to get to my operettas.... ;D

Thanks for taking one for the team Harry.  ;D
There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

Offline Bogey

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13488
  • Location: Colorado
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #43 on: December 08, 2007, 07:04:47 AM »
Finally got this from the library...a beautiful way (so far) to start of a cold, snowy Saturday morning...



Excellent.  A beautiful cold and snowy day here as well so I may give this one a re-spin as well.  My wife puts a priority on Christmas music this time of year, but I have been telling here all of the Monteverdi discs are just early Christmas music.....and it worked!  :D
There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

Harry

  • Guest
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #44 on: December 08, 2007, 07:22:48 AM »
Excellent.  A beautiful cold and snowy day here as well so I may give this one a re-spin as well.  My wife puts a priority on Christmas music this time of year, but I have been telling here all of the Monteverdi discs are just early Christmas music.....and it worked!  :D

A clever move Bill...... ;D

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 15334
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #45 on: December 08, 2007, 07:46:32 AM »
No, I don't mind but what you forgot to say is that it isn't very informed or learned opinion. Italian and French baroque are relatively recent interests of mine where I'm mostly just dabbling. More like an impression than serious review.

Thanks Drasko, and your impressions did not strike me as dabbling - found them very helpful.  :)

I have L'Orfeo in the recording by Harnoncourt. Very characterful, but in a rather strict and square "Germanic style. Having experienced the stunning results of excellent Italian HIP ensembles, I'm looking at the same direction as you for a new L'Orfeo: Alessandrini, Garrido or Cavina/Venexiana.
Found your feedback on the Alessandrini helpful as well :), and will be looking forward to your impressions on the Cavina!

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Bogey

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13488
  • Location: Colorado
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #46 on: December 08, 2007, 07:54:13 AM »
A clever move Bill...... ;D

Ah, I showed her the post soon after Harry and she just laughed while simutaneously giving me "the eye".  For the record, she does love "early Christmas" music. 
There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

Offline FideLeo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2110
  • 2 HIPs Hooray! ^_^
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #47 on: December 09, 2007, 04:56:14 AM »
Monteverdians!  :)
I would welcome any comments in this recording of the Vespers:



Q


An OVPP performance but not as extrovert in expression as one would have hoped from their
recordings of the madrigals.  Still very enjoyable though.  The recording conducted by Ralf Otto
on Capriccio is the one that actually surprised me with its refreshing interpretation - not Italian at all but
has a stylistic solidity and integrality all to itself.  Pregardien's singing here (early in his career) is
unforgettable.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2007, 04:57:45 AM by fl.traverso »
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 15334
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #48 on: December 09, 2007, 05:45:11 AM »
An OVPP performance but not as extrovert in expression as one would have hoped from their
recordings of the madrigals.  Still very enjoyable though.  The recording conducted by Ralf Otto
on Capriccio is the one that actually surprised me with its refreshing interpretation - not Italian at all but
has a stylistic solidity and integrality all to itself.  Pregardien's singing here (early in his career) is
unforgettable.

Thanks!  :) When sampling on-line I did notice the clarity in singing (obviously due to the OVPP), as well as the - especially for Alessandrini - introvert approach, which I think I wouldn't mind at all.
Now we're on the subject, these are also on my shortlist - the 2nd Savall recording is brand new a reissue of his recording on Astrée. (British and German(ic) Monteverdi have never caught on with me.) Again - comments are most welcome! :)

 

Q
« Last Edit: December 09, 2007, 08:15:27 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Drasko

  • Guest

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 15334
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #50 on: December 09, 2007, 06:01:59 AM »
« Last Edit: December 09, 2007, 06:04:19 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline FideLeo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2110
  • 2 HIPs Hooray! ^_^
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #51 on: December 09, 2007, 07:24:06 AM »
 

Q

I haven't heard the Garrido but read elsewhere that it is a letdown compared to what he achieved in the operas. 
The Savall, of course, is a crowd pleaser - very popular ever since it was released.  But I find it a bit too fuzzy both in acoustics and ensemble singing.  That the Alia Vox has been remastered may alter that impression though.
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 15334
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #52 on: February 23, 2008, 08:36:36 AM »


samples by clicking the picture

An OVPP performance but not as extrovert in expression as one would have hoped from their recordings of the madrigals. Still very enjoyable though.  The recording conducted by Ralf Otto on Capriccio is the one that actually surprised me with its refreshing interpretation - not Italian at all but has a stylistic solidity and integrality all to itself.  Pregardien's singing there (early in his career) is unforgettable.

I find this recording pretty stunning. OVPP (one voice per part) and indeed definitely a small scale, intimate, introvert account, stripped of all big gestures and grandeur. I was much more drawn in by the music and touched by its message. Despite Alessandrini's reputation (by some), this is anything but highly charged or over-the-top: it's very sober and pious. The result is much more in Renaissance style, instead of the more common "grand" & opulent "High Baroque-ish" style of performing this - designed to shock and awe... But less is more! 8)
A recording to treasure IMO.

Review on Musicweb


Q
« Last Edit: February 26, 2008, 10:05:10 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline Bogey

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13488
  • Location: Colorado
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #53 on: February 23, 2008, 08:38:25 AM »
Have not taken a listen, but thank you Que for getting the Monteverdi ball rolling again.
There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

Offline FideLeo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2110
  • 2 HIPs Hooray! ^_^
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #54 on: February 23, 2008, 11:10:11 AM »

Despite Alessandrini's reputation (by some), this is anything but highly charged or over-the-top: it's very sober and pious. The result is much more in Renaissance style, instead of the more common "grand" & opulent "High Baroque-ish" style of performing this - designed to shock and awe... But less is more! 8)

Review on Musicweb


Q

"To shock and awe" is not unique to high baroque - consider that Monteverdi claimed for himself a stylistic break ('stilo moderno';'seconda prattica') from the preceding period (high Renaissance, 'stilo antico';'prima prattica'). 
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline rubio

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1918
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #55 on: March 04, 2008, 11:26:13 PM »
Does this cycle of Monteverdi Madrigals stand up to the competition (from Venexiana and Alessandrini)?



I have ordered the 6th book by Alessandrini on Arcana. Are there any other killer individual recordings out there?
“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline Robert Dahm

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 44
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #56 on: March 05, 2008, 01:46:46 AM »
I'm not particularly fond of the Anthony Rooley set, myself, and I'm not familiar with the Alessandrini set.

La Venexiana are absolutely sublime in this repertoire. I would leap on it. Seriously. The seventh and eighth books, particularly, barely ever leave my desk. :D

Offline rubio

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1918
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #57 on: March 05, 2008, 02:24:55 AM »
I'm not particularly fond of the Anthony Rooley set, myself, and I'm not familiar with the Alessandrini set.

La Venexiana are absolutely sublime in this repertoire. I would leap on it. Seriously. The seventh and eighth books, particularly, barely ever leave my desk. :D

As I have Alessandrini's 6th book, I think I go for the seventh and eighth books by La Venexiana. But how does the eighth book of Rene Jacobs compare to La Venexiana?
“One good thing about music, when it hits- you feel no pain” Bob Marley

Offline Robert Dahm

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 44
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #58 on: March 05, 2008, 02:58:00 AM »
As I have Alessandrini's 6th book, I think I go for the seventh and eighth books by La Venexiana. But how does the eighth book of Rene Jacobs compare to La Venexiana?

The Jacobs eighth book is fine. The La Venexiana one is (apart from my shameful lack of familiarity with Alessandrini) in my opinion unparalleled. Apart from being a great account of this particular repertoire, it is music-making at its very finest.

Offline Josquin des Prez

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3655
  • Lyric Suite, Opus131
Re: Claudio Monteverdi
« Reply #59 on: March 05, 2008, 06:04:28 AM »
The sixth book of madrigals recorded by Alessandrini under Arcana is probably the finest rendition of this works i ever heard. If he had done the whole series there and then it could have been definitive. Alas, his new recordings aren't anywhere near as good.

La Venexiana is an interesting take, well recorded and packaged to boot, but bloody hell if their aren't slow. I'm still waiting for them to record the last book of madrigals by Gesualdo (*shakes fist*). Also, a word of warning about the Rooley set mentioned in this thread, it doesn't seem to contain the seventh book of madrigals, for whatever reason.