Author Topic: William Wordsworth(1908-1988): A Catalogue of the Orchestral and Choral Music  (Read 2141 times)

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Offline Dundonnell

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  • Edmund Rubbra(1901-86)
I have recently been engaged in compiling catalogues of the orchestral and large-scale choral works(ie vocal/choral music with orchestral accompaniment) of a number of British composers: Arnold Cooke, William Wordsworth, Peter Racine Fricker and Iain Hamilton. I am posting these catalogues here in the hope that they may be of some reference use to any members interested in these composers.

Cooke was the easiest because there is a complete list of his compositions on Musicweb and this had simply to be culled for the relevant pieces.

Fricker required the use of the Fricker archive held by the University of Santa Barbara. For Hamilton I had to go through the catalogues of both his British and American publishers.

In the case of Wordsworth I had to scour though the Archives of the Scottish Music Centre to produce the list below which, as far as I know, has never been published before.

WILLIAM WORDSWORTH: A CATALOGUE OF THE ORCHESTRAL AND CHORAL MUSIC


1932:   Allegretto in A minor for strings
1936:   Sonnet for soprano and orchestra
1937:   Three Pastoral Sketches for orchestra
1938:   Canzona for strings, op.12(1)
1939:   Sinfonia in A minor for string orchestra, op.6: 22 minutes
           “The Houseless Dead” for tenor, chorus and orchestra, op.14: 15 minutes
1941:   Ballade in E for strings, op.12(2)
1943:   Theme and Variations for small orchestra, op.19: 12 minutes
1942-44: Oratorio “Dies Domini” for soloists, chorus and orchestra, op.18: 65 minutes
1944:   Four Sacred Sonnets for low voice and orchestra, op.21a
             Symphony No.1 in F minor, op.23: 30 minutes
1945:   Hymn of Dedication for chorus and orchestra, op.26: 9 minutes (also version for chorus and string orchestra)
1946:   Piano Concerto, op.28: 23 minutes
1947-48: Symphony No.2 in D, op. 34: 40 minutes  + (Lyrita cd)
1949:   Processional Overture, op.39
             Dramatic Cantata “Lucifer Yields” for tenor, baritone, speaker, chorus and orchestra, op.40
1950:   “A Vision: Songs of Innocence and Experience for womens’ voices, strings and piano, op. 46
1950-51: Symphony No.3 in C, op.48: 23 minutes + (Lyrita cd)
1951:   “In No Strange Land” for piano, strings and choir: 6 minutes
1952:   Symphonic Study for strings, op.53: 13 minutes
1953:   Symphony No.4 in E flat, op. 54: 27 minutes
1954:   Divertimento for orchestra, op. 58: 25 minutes
1955:   Violin Concerto, op.60: 37 minutes
1956:   A Song of Praise for chorus and orchestra, op.61: 30 minutes
1957:   “The Peasants’ Revolt” for tenor, baritone, chorus and orchestra
1958:    Sinfonietta for chamber orchestra, op.62: 28 minutes
1959-60: Symphony No.5 in A minor, op. 68: 34 minutes
1962:   Cello Concerto, op.73
1964:   A Highland Overture, op.76
1965:   Jubilation-A Festivity for orchestra, op.78
1967:   Two Scottish Sketches for Small Orchestra, op.87
1969:   Valediction for orchestra, op.82a
             Overture “Conflict”, op.86: 9 minutes
             Sinfonia Semplice for strings, op.87: 12 minutes
1970:   “A Pattern of Love” for voice and strings, op.89
             Spring Festival Overture, op.90
1971:   A Christmas Garland for women’s voices, strings, piano and organ, op.91
1972:   Symposium for violin, strings and percussion, op.94
1976:   “Confluence”-Symphonic Variations for orchestra, op.100: 17 minutes
1977:   Symphony No.6 “Elegiaca” for soprano, mezzo-soprano, baritone, chorus and orchestra, op.102
1980:   Symphony No.7 “Cosmos”, op.107
1983:   “Excelsior”-A Memory of Walks on the High Hills of Scotland” for strings, op.112
1984:   Elegy for Frieda for strings, op.111a
1986:   Symphony No.8 “Pax Hominibus”, op.117

No date found:

Andante cantabile for strings
Festival March in C for orchestra
“The Fool’s Saga” for orchestra
Incidental Music to “The Hawk and the Handsaw”
Music for Pytheas for voice and orchestra
“Nun Komm, Der Heiden Heiland” for chorus and orchestra
Overture “The Forest”
Sea-Based Song Based on a Scots Traditional Tune for orchestra
Suite in A minor for String Orchestra
“The Two Princes”-Overture, Entracte and Songs


« Last Edit: February 22, 2012, 05:32:31 PM by Dundonnell »

Offline The new erato

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Very valuable work here.

There's a couple of really outstandong discs on the Lyrita label of composers that have been practically unexplored elsewhere, Grace Williams and William Wordsworth. The WW works are conventionally tonal, but exhibits personality and purpose within that idiom (the Grace Williams more modern, and to my ears, even finer). I have been dipping into new Dutton releases, and while there are much of value there (eg Bate, Chisholm, Arnell), there's also much aimless, meandering mediocrity. Of course even such music has a right to be recorded and heard, and it's Dutton's (and other labels) prerogative to decide what to record, but I cannot for the life of me understand why we cannot have more William Wordsworth on record.

Offline Dundonnell

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Very valuable work here.

There's a couple of really outstandong discs on the Lyrita label of composers that have been practically unexplored elsewhere, Grace Williams and William Wordsworth. The WW works are conventionally tonal, but exhibits personality and purpose within that idiom (the Grace Williams more modern, and to my ears, even finer). I have been dipping into new Dutton releases, and while there are much of value there (eg Bate, Chisholm, Arnell), there's also much aimless, meandering mediocrity. Of course even such music has a right to be recorded and heard, and it's Dutton's (and other labels) prerogative to decide what to record, but I cannot for the life of me understand why we cannot have more William Wordsworth on record.

I couldn't agree more :)

Dutton appears to me to be going for what must seem to them-and perhaps is in terms of current sales-the safer and easier option of plumping for easy-going, amiable, early 20th century romantic music with no dissonances of any kind. Their latest batch of releases concentrates exclusively on composers of that sort of music. Now I have nothing against such music, indeed I like some of it, but there is also some which is, as you say, "aimless, meandering mediocrity".

Offline The new erato

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Well, the time when I could buy Dutton releases more or less blindfolded and be sure to stumble into something interesting, certainly are long past. One could suspect that this is because the barrel is empty; i.e. no more interesting works to record, but luckily (or unfortunately) that isn't so.

Online mc ukrneal

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Thanks for this. Quite interesting (and a composer you inspire me to look into).

As to Dutton - you are really taking pot shots at them. I'll disagree - I love their latest releases. I snapped up Foulds and I will snap up the German just as soon as I can (and maybe the Catoire too). And I have several recent releases on my wishlist.
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline Dundonnell

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  • Edmund Rubbra(1901-86)
Some, many or even most Dutton releases are at least worthwhile. I usually buy at least four of their new releases each time. I enjoy and cherish these releases. They have done and are doing a wonderful job for British music but there is much music which has been recorded which is no more than amiable and light.

Whilst I have no difficulty with that music I have to say that their latest releases are not as well-balanced as in the past. There is nothing written after 1945 with the exceptions of the Lionel Sainsbury Cello Concerto and the Christopher Wright Violin Concerto. It just seems a pity when there is so much repertoire still unrecorded that this time round Dutton has not gone there :(

Offline starrynight

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I heard a couple of his symphonies in the 90s I think, I remember them getting a good review in the Penguin Record Guide so I looked at them.  Later though when I listened again I'm not sure they struck me as so interesting.