Author Topic: German Baroque Music  (Read 107222 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Antoine Marchand

  • Guest
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #180 on: April 26, 2009, 03:06:22 PM »
Naxos has not released too much (lesser known) German Baroque 

That's my impression too, excepting the organ works by Buxtehude and some discs of that composer previously released on Dacapo (all excellent).

I agree with you about Fasolis, his Membra Jesu Nostri is a must-have; although during the last months I have been considering this one:

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 14997
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #181 on: May 30, 2009, 11:41:06 PM »
This 2CD-set looks particularly enticing!
Anyone got it yet and/or could comment on the quality of the music? :)



An interview with Meierson on this issue on the Glossa site HERE.
A "babeled" review on KlassikHeute HERE.

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline 71 dB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5763
  • I free-think, therefore I am free
    • Soundcloud
  • Location: Helsinki, Finland
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #182 on: May 31, 2009, 12:08:14 AM »
Anyone got it yet and/or could comment on the quality of the music? :)

Unfortunately I don't know any music by Gottlieb Theophil Muffat (1690  – 1770).
I only have a Naxos disc of Concerti Grossi by his father Georg Muffat (1653-1704).

Georg studied under Lully while Gottlieb was Fux's student.
It seems Georg was more skilled composer than his son. I don't rate Georg Muffat very high.

Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page

Offline (: premont :)

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 6677
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #183 on: May 31, 2009, 02:02:45 AM »
I only have a Naxos disc of Concerti Grossi by his father Georg Muffat (1653-1704).
I don't rate Georg Muffat very high.

So you do not know his Apparatus Musico-Organisticus containing twelve great Toccatas, a Passacaglia and a Chaconne?
Several good recordings are available, among which Martin Haselböck on Naxos.

At his time Georg Muffat was regarded a master of counterpoint. Along with Pachelbel he was the most important South German composer of organ music of the pre-Bach (J S Bach) generation.

Gottlieb Muffat is (judged from the few works I have heard, - he does not appeal that much to me) lighter in style, more Rococo.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Bunny

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1849
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #184 on: May 31, 2009, 01:39:53 PM »
This 2CD-set looks particularly enticing!
Anyone got it yet and/or could comment on the quality of the music? :)



An interview with Meierson on this issue on the Glossa site HERE.
A "babeled" review on KlassikHeute HERE.

Q

I think I need a translator for the Babel translation!  It makes no sense at all in English, which is sad when you consider that Meyerson is American.                                                         

While I'm unfamiliar with this composer's music, I do have a recording by Mitzi Meyerson of Couperin, and she is a formidable harpsichordist. 

« Last Edit: May 31, 2009, 01:44:58 PM by Bunny »

Offline 71 dB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5763
  • I free-think, therefore I am free
    • Soundcloud
  • Location: Helsinki, Finland
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #185 on: June 01, 2009, 10:53:59 AM »
So you do not know his Apparatus Musico-Organisticus containing twelve great Toccatas, a Passacaglia and a Chaconne?

No I don't.

Several good recordings are available, among which Martin Haselböck on Naxos.

Seems like it's time to make my Naxos shopping list longer...  ;D

At his time Georg Muffat was regarded a master of counterpoint. Along with Pachelbel he was the most important South German composer of organ music of the pre-Bach (J S Bach) generation.

I am more into North Germany stuff but Pachelbel/Muffat are okay, I guess.  0:)

Gottlieb Muffat is (judged from the few works I have heard, - he does not appeal that much to me) lighter in style, more Rococo.

Naturally he must have been a composer of galant style.
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page

Bulldog

  • Guest
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #186 on: June 01, 2009, 11:55:12 AM »
So you do not know his Apparatus Musico-Organisticus containing twelve great Toccatas, a Passacaglia and a Chaconne?
Several good recordings are available, among which Martin Haselböck on Naxos.


I've had those two Naxos organ discs for many years and always enjoy the occasional listen.

Antoine Marchand

  • Guest
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #187 on: June 06, 2009, 06:23:38 AM »
Yesterday, I bought this excellent recording in a local store:

SCHÜTZ, H.: Lukas-Passion, SWV 480
Linderoth (tenor), Evangelist; Jespersen (bass baritone, Jesus)
Ars Nova Copenhagen
Paul Hillier (direction)
Dacapo

Today, I found this interesting podcast with Paul Hillier being interviewed by Raymond Bisha:

http://blog.naxos.com/2009/05/12/podcast-schutzs-passion-an-interview-with-paul-hillier/

Here a fair review of the recording:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/June09/Schutz_8226019.htm



Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 11999
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #188 on: June 06, 2009, 04:36:05 PM »
Thought that I was already a poster in this thread - not so!  :-\

So, now joining - by the way, just ordered the Muffat CD shown below:


Offline Coopmv

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11738
  • Mein Freund ist mein
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #189 on: June 06, 2009, 04:39:42 PM »
I have this CD, which is on the French Harmonia Mundi and is OOP ...


Antoine Marchand

  • Guest
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #190 on: June 07, 2009, 10:57:22 AM »
Yesterday, I bought this excellent recording in a local store:

SCHÜTZ, H.: Lukas-Passion, SWV 480
Linderoth (tenor), Evangelist; Jespersen (bass baritone, Jesus)
Ars Nova Copenhagen
Paul Hillier (direction)
Dacapo

Today, I found this interesting podcast with Paul Hillier being interviewed by Raymond Bisha:

http://blog.naxos.com/2009/05/12/podcast-schutzs-passion-an-interview-with-paul-hillier/

Here a fair review of the recording:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/June09/Schutz_8226019.htm




Today, after another listening, I did read the informative liner notes of the disc.

All the information is about the differences between this composition and Bach’s Passions. A kind of request/warning: Let’s listen to this setting in its own way! 

Recorded in St. Pauls Church, Copenhagen 10-11 April 2007, the sound is incredibly warm; beautifully sung and recited.

However, it is clear that this recording is only for people fully interested in pre-Bach composers (there is not instrumental accompaniment at all). But at least they will deserve the encouraging blessing of the “Conclusion”:  :)

“He who honours God’s suffering and often ponders His bitter death, will be well protected by His mercy here on earth, and there in eternal life”. 

Offline FideLeo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2110
  • 2 HIPs Hooray! ^_^
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #191 on: June 07, 2009, 11:24:32 AM »
I have this CD, which is on the French Harmonia Mundi and is OOP ...





This currently budget re-release is by the group Ars Antiqua Austria, led by the violinist Gunar Letzbor.  (Label: Symphonia)
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline Coopmv

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11738
  • Mein Freund ist mein
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #192 on: June 07, 2009, 11:40:22 AM »


This currently budget re-release is by the group Ars Antiqua Austria, led by the violinist Gunar Letzbor.  (Label: Symphonia)


It does not look like there are many versions of this work out there ...

Offline FideLeo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2110
  • 2 HIPs Hooray! ^_^
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #193 on: June 07, 2009, 12:07:13 PM »
It does not look like there are many versions of this work out there ...

It is, however, among the more famous works by this composer...
HIP for all and all for HIP! Harpsichord for Bach, fortepiano for Beethoven and pianoforte for Brahms!

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 11999
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #194 on: June 07, 2009, 12:58:52 PM »
It is, however, among the more famous works by this composer...

I'd have to agree w/ the above statement - the only other Muffat disc I owned before the order mentioned above: Parley of Instruments, a group that I've enjoyed in the past & a delightful recording -  :D


Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 14997
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #195 on: June 20, 2009, 04:29:47 AM »
 

Q - will be curious about your thoughts on these performances - the only Froberger that I own currently is w/ Remy (inserted above) - a 2-CD set from the Strasbourg Manuscript; I'm assuming that w/ the volume numbers on the Bob van Asperen disc shown that he 'covers' what is in my set?  Dave

Hi Dave, see earlier comments on Van Asperen's Froberger here: volume I & volume II. :)
I have the set by Rémy as well, but I frankly hardly ever listen to it anymore. It is nice but I have a clear preference for Van Asperen, who delves much deeper into the music IMO: more structured and articulated.
On the works. The Froberger edition on Aeolus presents all surviving keyboards, so it does contain all the works presented on the CPO issue of a particular manuscript with a collection of works, which are found spread over several issues of the Aeolus edition. The CPO follows the specific numbered used in that "Strasburg manuscript", so some dectective work is needed to figure out what corresponds to what! 8)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 11999
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #196 on: June 20, 2009, 05:01:02 AM »
Hi Dave, see earlier comments on Van Asperen's Froberger here: volume I & volume II. :)
I have the set by Rémy as well, but I frankly hardly ever listen to it anymore. It is nice but I have a clear preference for Van Asperen, who delves much deeper into the music IMO: more structured and articulated.
On the works. The Froberger edition on Aeolus presents all surviving keyboards, so it does contain all the works presented on the CPO issue of a particular manuscript with a collection of works, which are found spread over several issues of the Aeolus edition. The CPO follows the specific numbered used in that "Strasburg manuscript", so some dectective work is needed to figure out what corresponds to what! 8)

Hello Q - thanks for the comments & links - quite a project by Aeolus - will certainly put Van Asperen on my consideration list!  :)  Dave

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 14997
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #197 on: August 17, 2009, 06:11:00 AM »
.



Reaffirming my recommendation for this Froberger series by Bob van Asperen after listening to the 3rd installment. Performances are beyond reproach IMO: clarity and equilibrity, combined with sufficient impetus and playfulness - wonderful!  :) Van Asperen plays a lush and transparent sounding anonymous French harpsichord from c.1700.

In the three volumes that I've acquired so far, this series goes from strength to strength - more information in the posts above. And my favourable impression of Froberger's music - continues to be strengthened as well. :)

Q
« Last Edit: July 22, 2016, 11:03:46 PM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline (: premont :)

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 6677
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #198 on: August 18, 2009, 05:24:36 AM »
Thought that I was already a poster in this thread - not so!  :-\

So, now joining - by the way, just ordered the Muffat CD shown below:



Got this recently. Unfortunately only a very small part of Georg Muffat´s harpsichord music has survived, but this is rather substantial music and it is a must for anyone interested in the evolution of the baroque German Claviersuite (Froberger, Pachelbel, Weckmann, Böhm, Buxtehude, and Bach of course).
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Coopmv

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 11738
  • Mein Freund ist mein
Re: German Baroque Music
« Reply #199 on: August 18, 2009, 04:04:52 PM »


Reaffirming my recommendation for this Froberger series by Bob van Asperen after listening to the 3rd installment. Performances are beyond reproach IMO: clarity and equilibrity, combined with sufficient impetus and playfulness - wonderful!  :) Van Asperen plays a lush and transparent sounding anonymous French harpsichord from c.1700.

In the three volumes that I've acquired so far, this series goes from strength to strength - more information in the posts above. And my favourable impression of Froberger's music - continues to be strengthened as well. :)

Q

I should give these Froberger volumes by van Asperen some serious consideration.  I just ordered his WTC at MDT and look forward to receiving it along with a few other works ...