Author Topic: 21st century classical music  (Read 176014 times)

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Offline brooklyn

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1260 on: March 05, 2017, 10:13:19 AM »
I'm working my way through this thread and adding so many works to my list of listening. Some random works I like a lot are:

Matthew Hindson: Pulse Magnet (2001)
Per Nørgård - Violin Concerto No. 2 (Borderlines) (2002)
Tarik O'Regan - Fragments from a Gradual Process (2005)
Hans Abrahamsen - Double Concerto for violin, piano and string orchestra (2011)
Hans Abrahamsen - Let Me Tell You (2013)
Thomas Ades - Violin Concerto (Concentric Paths) (2005)




Offline arpeggio

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1261 on: March 05, 2017, 06:43:24 PM »
I have been listening to Richard Danielpour's Toward a Season of Peace.  I submitted a post about it the "Purchases Today" Thread.

Offline Henk

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1262 on: June 12, 2017, 10:10:47 AM »
Differences - visions of contemporary composition (Unexplained Sounds Group, 2017)


https://unexplainedsoundsgroup.bandcamp.com/album/differences-visions-of-contemporary-composition

Guy Gelem, Sisto Palombella, Healer Oran, Caleb R. K. Williams, Susan Campos Fonseca, Stefan schmidt, Braghsdn & Globoscuro, The New Oslo Losers Trio, Matthias Boss, Rafael Toral, Ernesto Schmied, Santiago Fradejas, Saturno Devorando and Susan Campos Fonseca, Layma Azur, Diego Alladio, Disaster Area + Jutta Pryor, Shawn Bell, Strange Raven Sky, Paulo Chagas, Wilhelm Matthies, Eugene Fall, axöne, Eric Arn, Mario Lino Stancati (feat. MariaTodaro), Jane Nummela, Kraums Notho, Karakasa Kozō, Philip Mantione, Matthias Boss + Mauro Sambo, The Voices (Featuring Pierluigi Ammirata), Claus Paulsen

Three and a half hours of contemporary music by composers from Israel, Italy, South Africa, Spain, Lithuania, ... From lovely & accessible pieces to fairly experimental works, this is a nice compilation of new music.

Thanks. Bought this. The samples sounded very nice.
"New ears for new music" (Nietzsche, The Anti-christ)

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Offline aleazk

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1263 on: June 12, 2017, 01:33:05 PM »
Quite a lot!

Just some (very) random favorites...

-Dai Fujikura:

Sparking Orbit for electric guitar and electronics (2013): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=88AM3tPtVfc

Prism Spectra for viola and electronics (2009): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOo8ygto2bA

-Georg F. Haas:

limited approximations (2010): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BoqvGLdjUhE

String Quartet No.7 with electronics (2011): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TDiCfbTwMDE

-Beat Furrer:

Piano Concerto (2007): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MjRbdhp9Ef8

-Iancu Dumitrescu:

Etude granulaire (2005): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_zB0UJDFy8

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1264 on: June 13, 2017, 03:52:08 AM »
Fujikura seems to constantly be producing masterpiece after masterpiece. Have you heard his second piano concerto, aleazk? It's one I particularly enjoy. His works with electronics are wonderful as well.

Offline arpeggio

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1265 on: June 24, 2017, 08:36:52 PM »




I found the following reviews:

http://www.classicstoday.com/review/review-14679/?search=1

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2009/Jan09/Lindberg_ode11242.htm

The following reviewer did not care for the Concerto for Orchestra but had positive remarks concerning the other works on the CD:

https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/lindberg-campana-in-aria-concerto-for-orchestra-sculpture

Two of the works on the above were composed since 2000: The Sculpture(2005) and the Concerto for Orchestra(2003).  I have just finished listening to this CD again and I really like these works.

For some reason, and I have no idea why, I really am having problems getting into the Campana in aria for horn and orchestra (1998)

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1266 on: June 24, 2017, 08:55:13 PM »
Two of the works on the above were composed since 2000: The Sculpture(2005) and the Concerto for Orchestra(2003).  I have just finished listening to this CD again and I really like these works.

For some reason, and I have no idea why, I really am having problems getting into the Campana in aria for horn and orchestra (1998)

Maybe because that horn+orchestra work is 20th century and this is the 21st century music thread ;D

The other two are rather longer pieces, which I tend to prefer. I have found that Lindberg is particularly good at timing in his compositions. The spacing of events and ideas through the course of a 20 to 30 minute work never feels like I am listening to a piece of music for that length of time. More like a 6 minute piece in four times that length. Cool illusion. Makes me feel very immersed.

Contemporaryclassical

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1267 on: June 24, 2017, 09:01:26 PM »
-Iancu Dumitrescu:

Etude granulaire (2005): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_zB0UJDFy8

This is different. My ears have never been graced with anything like this before, I like it

Offline eljr

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1268 on: June 25, 2017, 04:39:16 AM »
great thread  :)
“You practice and you get better. It’s very simple.”
Philip Glass

Offline aleazk

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1269 on: June 26, 2017, 04:45:32 AM »
This is different. My ears have never been graced with anything like this before, I like it
:)

Offline aleazk

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1270 on: June 26, 2017, 07:07:43 AM »
Awesome piece by Ferneyhough!

Inconjunctions (for ensemble) (2014)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jH5pTtJWJy8

Highly recommendable!

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1271 on: June 26, 2017, 12:46:16 PM »
Awesome piece by Ferneyhough!

Inconjunctions (for ensemble) (2014)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jH5pTtJWJy8

Highly recommendable!

Ah yes this is a great one which I really admire. I love the gradual addition of instruments in the first few minutes of the piece and this is a great example of his intensely lyrical style.

Offline San Antone

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1272 on: November 08, 2017, 05:53:51 AM »
A work for flute, bass clarinet, percussion and string quartet by Uğurcan Öztekin — Naufragii

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/68wubowXtXc&amp;feature=em-subs_digest" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/68wubowXtXc&amp;feature=em-subs_digest</a>

performed by Hezarfen Ensemble

Naufragii (2017) by Uğurcan Öztekin

June 22, 2017
Bilkent Concert Hall, Ankara

Orhun Orhon, conductor
Cem Önertürk, Flute
Elif Aksoy, Bass Clarinet
Amy Salsgiver, Percussion
Müge Hendekli, Piano
Özcan Ulucan, Violin I
Doğu Kaptaner, Violin II
Ulrich Mertin, Viola
Çağlayan Çetin, Violoncello

kishnevi

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1273 on: November 08, 2017, 04:32:51 PM »
You reminded me: I meant to post this CD here, because of the Uçarsu, which was written about five years ago. It's probably the best thing on the CD, whose overall title is taken from Glass's quartet, Company. Ironically the Glass is to my ears the weakest component in the CD.

Offline some guy

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1274 on: November 09, 2017, 03:03:03 AM »
A work for flute, bass clarinet, percussion and string quartet by Uğurcan Öztekin — Naufragii
Really charming piece. Lovely timbres. I was lucky enough to be at the premiere of his "Ars Moriendi" last year, at the Festival Mixtur.

https://www.ugurcanoztekin.com/videos
« Last Edit: November 09, 2017, 03:05:35 AM by some guy »

Offline San Antone

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1275 on: November 09, 2017, 11:32:02 AM »
Dieter Ammann - "glut" (2014-2016) for orchestra

The swiss composer earned School Music Diplomas I and II at the Academy for School and Church Music in Lucerne and also attended the Swiss Jazz School in Berne.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/pDNyvfoHjdE" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/pDNyvfoHjdE</a>

Ammann took up composing only at the age of twenty-eight. Master classes with W. Lutoslawsi, W. Rihm, D. Schnebel and N. Castiglioni. In course of time, he began liberating himself from serial techniques and subsequently arrived at a freer, more intuitive approach.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1276 on: November 10, 2017, 04:29:24 AM »
[...] In course of time, he began liberating himself from serial techniques and subsequently arrived at a freer, more intuitive approach.

If only we are more careful about the habits we form earlier on . . . .
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
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nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline some guy

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1277 on: November 11, 2017, 03:52:28 AM »
Reading, again, about the still notorious system for managing pitches, I suddenly realized that 1937 was 80 years ago.
« Last Edit: November 11, 2017, 04:02:58 AM by some guy »

Offline Crudblud

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1278 on: November 13, 2017, 11:58:13 AM »
Dieter Ammann - "glut" (2014-2016) for orchestra

I feel like I've been hearing many pieces exactly like this whenever I look up 21st century orchestral stuff on YouTube. Has this "swimmy" aesthetic been in fashion for several decades now or do I just have a tin ear for what's new?

Offline some guy

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1279 on: November 13, 2017, 01:36:42 PM »
I think this kind of thing may have begun, or have begun to take over the previous Lutosławski kind of orchestral piece, in the mid-90s or thereabouts, so a couple of decades, anyway.

It's a smoother, duller sound than Lutosławski favored--though I was still hearing a lot of the bright, brassy stuff with lots of percussion until well into the new century.

As Brümmer put it to me once, the problem with instruments is that they take over--an orchestral piece almost always sounds like "an orchestral piece." The brass are brassy, the flutes are flutey, the percussion is percussive, the strings are stringy. And the music, however interesting or different the composer may have wanted to be, slips into the old, familiar patterns because it's old, familiar instruments that are playing (being written for).

I advanced Lachenmann and Andre, but he wasn't having any of it.

Anyway, as I've thought of it since, it's true that each machine has certain things that it does that over time come to be seen as the normal things, the natural things, for that machine. Pizzacato was seen by some, even hundreds of years after its introduction, as unnatural. And a fairly prominent violinist once went off on how she and her classmates would laugh at Penderecki pieces when in uni because they were so "unviolinistic." I said "What constitutes 'unviolinistic'? If a violin can do it, it's violinistic," but she wasn't having any of it. And Cowell's and later Cage's "unpianistic" adventures with pianos made one or two people deeply unhappy.

It takes a keen, imaginative mind and a willing performer to push the bounds of what is accepted as natural for each machine. I think we've actually been pretty lucky at having so many of those two types of people. Still, they are undoubtedly outnumbered by the "this is what a trumpet does, the end" crowd.