Author Topic: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)  (Read 62311 times)

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Offline aukhawk

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #480 on: October 22, 2018, 02:16:37 AM »
Scarlatti on 2 (or more) discs?

Sudbin and Huangci would top my list, with Queffelec's more recent 1-disc recital on Mirare also very fine, her earlier one I find a bit mundane.  And Hantai on harpsichord. 
Hewitt has also recorded two discs, very listenable but no match for Sudbin as I hear it, but at least she wins on the cover art by a country mile.

« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 02:25:40 AM by aukhawk »

Offline Jo498

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #481 on: October 22, 2018, 03:00:09 AM »
Soler is mostly post-baroque already, I'd say. Later on he wrote 4-movement sonatas that are basically classical, despite certain differences to the "mainstream" classical style of central Europe. Heck, even Scarlatti is gallant style, almost pre-classical at times.
For me the whole point of listening to Scarlatti is that his sonatas are quite different from Bach fugues, Handel suites or the French clavecinists.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Online milk

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #482 on: October 22, 2018, 03:29:49 AM »
Soler is mostly post-baroque already, I'd say. Later on he wrote 4-movement sonatas that are basically classical, despite certain differences to the "mainstream" classical style of central Europe. Heck, even Scarlatti is gallant style, almost pre-classical at times.
For me the whole point of listening to Scarlatti is that his sonatas are quite different from Bach fugues, Handel suites or the French clavecinists.
I really like Pieter-Jan Belder's Soler series. Sorry to get off-topic here.

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #483 on: October 22, 2018, 04:15:23 AM »
... I've been trying with Scarlatti for years and I have a good variety of recordings. I may keep trying. ...

Can I recommend this Youtube video, I suggest you skip the introduction and start at around 2:10, lasting about 8 minutes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8K0fxivBhr0
this lady takes you blow-by-blow through K27, which is probably the most-recorded of all the sonatas and certainly my favourite.  Warning: her 'analysis' and interpretation here puts a decidedly romantic spin on the music - but it can take it.   :-\
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 04:17:49 AM by aukhawk »

Online milk

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #484 on: October 22, 2018, 04:32:28 AM »
Can I recommend this Youtube video, I suggest you skip the introduction and start at around 2:10, lasting about 8 minutes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8K0fxivBhr0
this lady takes you blow-by-blow through K27, which is probably the most-recorded of all the sonatas and certainly my favourite.  Warning: her 'analysis' and interpretation here puts a decidedly romantic spin on the music - but it can take it.   :-\
I'll definitely take a look tomorrow. Thanks! I remember K27 as being a really catchy one. Scarlatti does have some gripping, almost avant guard, pieces.

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #485 on: October 22, 2018, 07:08:48 AM »
The strange section in K27 where a short riff is repeated 7 times, like a cracked record before someone jogs the needle and the music can move on - is like a pre-echo of Philip Glass.
As can be seen from the video, this repeated riff includes a single crossed-hand note where the left hard reaches across the right, and I have this fantasy vision of old Scarlatti and his young pupil, Princess Maria Barbara, sitting side by side on the fortepiano stool as he teaches her this piece. 
"You take the right hand, your Royal Highness" he says "and I'll take the left".
...
"Oh, excuse me your Highness, for entirely musical reasons I just need to reach across you and ..."
Plink.
"Oh, er, and again your Majesty ..."
Plink.
"Aaaand again Ma'am ..."
Plink.
"One more time my dear ..."
Plink.
...
"Oh Monsieur Domingo, you cannot stop there!"

Plink.
"Again, I command you!"
Plink.
"For entirely musical reasons, Your Highness ..."
Plink.

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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    anything from Monteverdi to Widmann and well beyond in either direction and everything in the middle!
Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #486 on: October 22, 2018, 07:44:35 AM »
The strange section in K27 where a short riff is repeated 7 times, like a cracked record before someone jogs the needle and the music can move on - is like a pre-echo of Philip Glass.
As can be seen from the video, this repeated riff includes a single crossed-hand note where the left hard reaches across the right, and I have this fantasy vision of old Scarlatti and his young pupil, Princess Maria Barbara, sitting side by side on the fortepiano stool as he teaches her this piece. 
"You take the right hand, your Royal Highness" he says "and I'll take the left".
...
"Oh, excuse me your Highness, for entirely musical reasons I just need to reach across you and ..."
Plink.
"Oh, er, and again your Majesty ..."
Plink.
"Aaaand again Ma'am ..."
Plink.
"One more time my dear ..."
Plink.
...
"Oh Monsieur Domingo, you cannot stop there!"

Plink.
"Again, I command you!"
Plink.
"For entirely musical reasons, Your Highness ..."
Plink.

You either know this or are uncannily close to the truth, but Mozart's little ditty-sonatas for four hands were written PRECISELY in such a way so that Mozart could play finger-footsie (for lack of a better term) with the ladies he was teaching.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #487 on: October 22, 2018, 07:56:34 AM »

For me the whole point of listening to Scarlatti is that his sonatas are quite different from Bach fugues, Handel suites or the French clavecinists.

Do you reckon this sounds a bit like Scarlatti?

<a href="https://youtube.com/v/dcODeWdFVuY" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://youtube.com/v/dcODeWdFVuY</a>
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Jo498

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Re: Domenico Scarlatti (1685-1757)
« Reply #488 on: October 22, 2018, 08:46:56 AM »
Certainly more than the Art of Fugue...! Among the more obviously brilliant sections of the Goldberg variations are maybe also some somewhat close to Scarlatti and the D major and (I think) B flat major preludes from WTC II also remind me of Scarlatti to some extent. But overall this does not change the fact that the more lyrical or "gypsy guitar" like Scarlatti sonatas are quite unlike Bach.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)