Author Topic: Tippett's Tearoom  (Read 55762 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #440 on: October 28, 2017, 09:32:46 PM »
I like Tippett's first two symphonies quite a bit, but I do understand what you mean about his music being too complex and "busy" for its own good. That said, I've sampled a bit of his The Rose Lake which sounded quite entrancing.

The Rose Lake is very much worth your time, Kyle.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #441 on: October 29, 2017, 01:10:31 AM »
A new CD of symphonies 1 and 2 is coming out on Hyperion I think. A former work colleague knew Tippett quite well. He is not one of my favourite composers but I think that the Concerto for Double String Orchestra is a wonderful work. I also like symphonies 1 and 2 the Corelli Variations, the Suite of the Birthday of Prince Charles and the oratorio 'A Child of Our Time', the end of which I find incredibly moving.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline DaveF

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #442 on: October 30, 2017, 01:15:54 PM »
A new CD of symphonies 1 and 2 is coming out on Hyperion I think.

Yes - conducted by the indefatigable Brabbins.  That is good news - even no.2, a 20th-century masterpiece (IMHO), isn't exactly well-served on disc.  No.1 is superb too, with that rather Shostakovich-like (and rather un-Tippett-like) passacaglia slow movement.
"Just because I like something, it doesn't mean it's any good."

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #443 on: February 01, 2018, 11:31:23 PM »
I have just posted a recording of the BBC broadcast of the Symphony in Bflat from 1932 ('Symphony No.0')

http://artmusic.smfforfree.com/index.php/topic,506.195.html

(You have to register before being able to download).

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #444 on: October 12, 2018, 09:46:23 AM »
Good job I checked there was a thread for Tippett - otherwise I was going to start Tippett's tribulations...!

Is it just my impression or has Tippett really fallen from favour since his death?  OK there is this Hyperion cycle started of his symphonies - but not much else is being added to the recorded catalogue.  Is he featuring much in concerts?  I really don't know.

He's never been a favourite or even a moderatley liked composer of mine but out of duty(!) rather than pleasure I listened to Symphony No.4 recently from Hickox



and goodness me I enjoyed it a lot.  Excellent Chandos engineering backing up really committed BSO playing.  I still think he makes the textures and the musical material too complex - but I'm closely than ever to being convinced......

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #445 on: October 12, 2018, 03:30:57 PM »
Good job I checked there was a thread for Tippett - otherwise I was going to start Tippett's tribulations...!

Is it just my impression or has Tippett really fallen from favour since his death?  OK there is this Hyperion cycle started of his symphonies - but not much else is being added to the recorded catalogue.  Is he featuring much in concerts?  I really don't know.

He's never been a favourite or even a moderatley liked composer of mine but out of duty(!) rather than pleasure I listened to Symphony No.4 recently from Hickox



and goodness me I enjoyed it a lot.  Excellent Chandos engineering backing up really committed BSO playing.  I still think he makes the textures and the musical material too complex - but I'm closely than ever to being convinced......

It's a captivating and mysterious work, it could not be straightforward at first listens but my experience with this symphony is always rewarding. There is a masterful use of the percussion to create some disquieting effects. I only have that recording and I'm quite pleased with it.

Online Biffo

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #446 on: October 13, 2018, 02:29:39 AM »
Several years ago there was quite an active discussion of Tippett and the 4th Symphony in particular. I had owned the Solti/Chicago SO recording for quite some time so I listened to it again; as with my first listening it it did very little for me. Others were enthusiastic so I persisted. I found an analysis of the work and was able to follow it while listening. It clarified the structure of the piece but still didn't endear it to me.

My favourite Tippett pieces are the Fantasia Concertante on a Theme of Corelli and the Concerto for Double String Orchestra - Marriner/ASMF is unsurpassed in both.

Offline knight66

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #447 on: October 13, 2018, 01:18:24 PM »
About the only large scale piece of his that has a foothold in the UK is The Child of Our Time. Up against his operas for example, it is accessable. The contempory champions of his operas have died, Hickox and Davis, and no one currently seems inclined to advocate them. They are like slabs of philosophy stuffed onto the stage. And listening to him explaining them, I felt I could understand why they were so clotted and basically untheatrical.

I can’t remember the last time I saw one of his symphonies programmed, mabe a year or so ago in the London Proms.

Perhaps he will be rediscovered. Or perhaps Child of Our Time and the string pieces mentioned will be all that is played.

Mike
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Offline Maestro267

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #448 on: October 16, 2018, 02:14:19 AM »
At least with recordings of many of his works, people have the opportunity to discover Tippett's music, if they wish to dig for it.

Offline relm1

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #449 on: October 16, 2018, 06:50:15 AM »
I enjoy his late oratorio, The Mask of Time.  It is quite an evocative work spanning 95 minutes.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #450 on: October 16, 2018, 07:46:48 AM »
I never have been able to appreciate late Tippett. The Mask of Time is no exception. There’s one late work which I think is quite beautiful and it’s The Rose Lake.
“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Online North Star

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #451 on: October 16, 2018, 07:58:53 AM »
Good to see you back, John!

Agreed about The Rose Lake - I think I'll revisit the Hickox recording now, actually. I'd also add the string quartets and the Piano Concerto to the list of Tippett that shouldn't be forgotten..
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #452 on: October 16, 2018, 08:26:52 AM »
Good to see you back, John!

Agreed about The Rose Lake - I think I'll revisit the Hickox recording now, actually. I'd also add the string quartets and the Piano Concerto to the list of Tippett that shouldn't be forgotten..

Yes, good to see you back indeed.

I must listen to the Rose Lake.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline knight66

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #453 on: October 16, 2018, 01:16:45 PM »
I will give The Rose Lake a listen, it is some time since I heard it. Another very late work, it disappointed me, but I ought to go back to it with my expectations being different. Byzantium was written with Jessye Norman in mind and she had the piece for about a year, only telling Solti and Chicago two weeks before the premier that she was withdrawing for personal reasons. The Soprano who took over at short notice and appears on the disc has a very different kind of voice. It is not her fault that she sounds completely unlike Norman, who possibly was in any case unsuited to the tessitura of the piece. I recall it as sounding fractured, without the long melodies I had hoped for. So, as I say, time for another go at it.

I was conducted by Tippet in two performances of Child of Our Time. He was getting on a bit, though had a fair few years left in him. He absolutely knew the piece in microscopic detail, correcting some parts errors in the brass. He was exceptionally short sighted, checking the score by holding it within a couple of inches of his eyes. He was delightful, like an aging public schoolboy. He wafted his hand at us in the choir and said that he was aware we were there but he could not see us at all.

In performance he lost concentration and stopped conducting at the ‘What of the boy then?’ passage. We followed the leader until he came back to us. A sweat on the back of the knees moment. The lapse was something our chief conductor Alexander Gibson was prone to, not an age induced problem with him though.

Mike
« Last Edit: October 16, 2018, 10:51:18 PM by knight66 »
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Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Tippett's Tearoom
« Reply #454 on: October 18, 2018, 04:10:31 PM »
The five string  quartets  are marvellous. The fourth and fifth in particular are very late Beethovenish. The fifth is a kind of valedictory work with quotations from earlier works... fun to see how many you can identify.