Author Topic: Chopin's mazurkas  (Read 36521 times)

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Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #80 on: December 04, 2014, 09:21:40 AM »


Gabor Csalog plays all the Mazurkas. Very authoritative and imaginative performances, which somehow combines a stong mazurka kick, a good feel for how to make the rubato organic, an approach which isn't overly perfumed or overly heavy,  and a real sensitivity to the bittersweet elelent, the zal. I don't know what piano he uses - could well be a an old Erard or Pleyel. I like this - it may deserve a place in the top drawer of complete mazurka recordings - along with Indjic and Flier.

Csalog is a mover and shaker in the world of Chopin studies, he has published an urtext of the mazurkas. The informed approach pays off - as so often the case.
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #81 on: June 23, 2015, 08:34:15 AM »


Andrzej Wasowski plays all Chopin's Mazurkas. He makes them in recitatives, dramatic recitatives. He's very aware of the melancholy in the music, and that means that the drama appears psychological.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2015, 09:06:17 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline George

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #82 on: June 23, 2015, 08:41:11 AM »


Andrej Wasowski plays all Chopin's Mazurkas. He makes them in recitatives, dramatic recitatives. He's very aware of the melancholy in the music, and that means that the drama appears psychological.

A great set! His Nocturnes are lovely as well!
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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #83 on: June 23, 2015, 08:46:06 AM »
Period instrument Chopin Mazurkas



There are some noteworthy and lovely things about this recording. First, there is the mellow tone of the restored 1830s Collard & Collard square piano, the kind of instrument on which Chopin’s mazurkas would have been played in drawing rooms all over Europe. Second, there is a seductive intimacy to Asheim’s playing that resonates with the domestic nature of these miniature gems. Third, it is fascinating to hear how the tone quality and short decay of the instrument influence the performance of the music. Asheim uses asynchronised hands and introduces arpeggiated chords at will – much like Chopin is said to have done in his free treatment of his own work (Berlioz, Lenz, Hallé and many others attest to this). (Gramophone, 2014)

Most interesting, thanks.
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Offline North Star

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #84 on: June 23, 2015, 08:52:06 AM »
Most interesting, thanks.
+1
Audio samples here.
A pity it's not a complete set.
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #85 on: June 23, 2015, 09:04:43 AM »
A great set! His Nocturnes are lovely as well!

Do you have his preludes? (They're on youtube but I want good sound)
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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #86 on: June 23, 2015, 09:08:12 AM »
Do you have his preludes? (They're on youtube but I want good sound)
And I would like to have all of his Chopin in good sound. :)
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #87 on: June 23, 2015, 09:13:46 AM »
And I would like to have all of his Chopin in good sound. :)

I can put the other stuff on symphonyshare.
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Offline George

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #88 on: June 23, 2015, 09:20:12 AM »
Do you have his preludes? (They're on youtube but I want good sound)

I don't, no.
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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #89 on: June 23, 2015, 09:25:25 AM »
I can put the other stuff on symphonyshare.
Thanks. There's no rush as I won't be able to enjoy them before August in any case.
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Offline Brian

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #90 on: June 23, 2015, 09:34:52 AM »
Period instrument Chopin Mazurkas



There are some noteworthy and lovely things about this recording. First, there is the mellow tone of the restored 1830s Collard & Collard square piano, the kind of instrument on which Chopin’s mazurkas would have been played in drawing rooms all over Europe. Second, there is a seductive intimacy to Asheim’s playing that resonates with the domestic nature of these miniature gems. Third, it is fascinating to hear how the tone quality and short decay of the instrument influence the performance of the music. Asheim uses asynchronised hands and introduces arpeggiated chords at will – much like Chopin is said to have done in his free treatment of his own work (Berlioz, Lenz, Hallé and many others attest to this). (Gramophone, 2014)

I got to review this for MusicWeb. It really is good, and enjoyable; sometimes Asheim plays far faster than I'd like, but you could argue about that being period practice. Another potentially "authentic" quality is the (very rare, not intrusive) wrong notes.

Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #91 on: June 23, 2015, 08:11:09 PM »


Maryla Jonas plays some mazurkas. The style reminds me of Gustav Leonhardt in his Froberger for Teldec, and in his Frescobaldi for Philips. That's to say it's both expressive and controled, accurate. The result is abstract and humane - humane because it's expressive, and abstract because the control means that there's never any impression that the pianist is just vaunting her own states of mind. I appreciate this universalised apollonian style a lot, and I'd like to hear the same approach in other romantic music.

The recording on Pearl, which contains some of the mazurkas on this LP, is so marred by poor sound it's hard to appreciate her art in any detail.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2015, 08:15:16 PM by Mandryka »
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #92 on: June 25, 2015, 03:40:15 AM »


Janina Fialkowska plays Chopin's mazurkas. This is some of the the most emotionally subtle, nuanced and varied, the most beautiful, the most focused, mazurka playing I have heard.  It is also the least stormy, the least passionate, the most "tasteful", the most genteel.
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Offline George

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #93 on: June 25, 2015, 04:01:41 AM »


Janina Fialkowska plays Chopin's mazurkas. This is some of the the most emotionally subtle, nuanced and varied, the most beautiful, the most focused, mazurka playing I have heard.  It is also the least stormy, the least passionate, the most "tasteful", the most genteel.

This sounds good! She was a student of Rubinstein, if I recall correctly.
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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #94 on: June 25, 2015, 04:27:22 AM »


Janina Fialkowska plays Chopin's mazurkas. This is some of the the most emotionally subtle, nuanced and varied, the most beautiful, the most focused, mazurka playing I have heard.  It is also the least stormy, the least passionate, the most "tasteful", the most genteel.
Tempting...
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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #95 on: June 25, 2015, 04:35:50 AM »
Indeed.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #96 on: June 25, 2015, 06:07:51 AM »
One of the most remarkable things about Fialkowska is the way she takes each reptition in the music and gives it an individual emotional nuance. That, combined with her sense of refinement, nobility. She may be Rubinstein's pupil but she's not distant and aloof from the music like Rubinstein came to be after the war, nor does she have Rubinstein's outgoing showmanship. People who like, e.g., Kulenkampff and Schneiderhan in Beethoven, will find a lot to appreciate in her Chopin. In terms of basic things like tone, she's like a good claret. Her Chopin sonatas are well worth catching, and the Liszt sonata too.
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #97 on: May 12, 2018, 01:18:41 AM »


These Dresden China mazurkas from Pavel Kolesnikov are like a breath of fresh air. He completely dispenses with the idea that Chopin was wise, profound and surprising. In Kolesnikov's hands the mazurkas are hardly a sustained engagement with the human condition.  There's very little if any dream like meditation, there's very little if any tension between irregular rhythms and fluid song, There ain't much emotional ambiguity, any interesting counterpoint in the music is hardly brought into prominence.

What Kolesnikov gives us is something which sings and dances along without much of a care in the world. In these mazurkas God's in his heaven and all's right with the world - at least the world that's visible from the bourgeois salon.

Kolesnikov makes a sound which suits the superficiality of the interpretation - light and silvery and rather lovely.

These are mazurkas for the background, not to be taken too seriously.

« Last Edit: May 12, 2018, 01:37:36 AM by Mandryka »
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Online Mandryka

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #98 on: May 12, 2018, 01:35:46 AM »


Dang Thai Son knows how to drive a piano and he knows how to play Chopin. The tone he makes emerge is . . . hammerless and richly colourful; the interpretations are nuanced and sophisticated. The playing is full of a totally natural and rather original rubato. The irony in the music, the ambiguous emotional life of the mazurkas, is well realised. There's not the slightest suggestion of either the bourgeois salon or peasant dance hall. These mazurkas are, in Dang's hands, soul music, not just foot music or voice  music.

This is one of the best mazurka sets on modern piano. What a shame he didn't use a real Chopin piano though!
« Last Edit: May 12, 2018, 01:41:50 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline George

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Re: Chopin's mazurkas
« Reply #99 on: May 12, 2018, 05:10:53 AM »
Thanks for the info, Mandryka!

Who are your overall favorites, in order if you don't mind, at this point for the Mazurkas?
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