Author Topic: L'Isle Ibert  (Read 3056 times)

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Offline snyprrr

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L'Isle Ibert
« on: September 08, 2012, 10:13:41 PM »
I couldn't find a Thread or WebSite, so here's the WikiPage:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques_Ibert


I have the original 2cd EMI (European?) set culled from recordings by Fremaux, Martinon, Pahud, and Van Dam:

http://www.amazon.com/Ibert-Divertissement-Escales-Concerto-Symphonie/dp/B0013D8K78/ref=sr_1_2?s=music&ie=UTF8&qid=1347168730&sr=1-2&keywords=ibert

I have heard and enjoyed his cello concerto with winds, and have thoroughly enjoyed the 'Complete Chamber Music' on Brilliant (Olympia) for a while,... and the big Flute Concerto, but I have never really given Ibert a listen until now.

The EMI set contains two previous recitals by Fremaux and Martinon, both from the '70s, and opens with the corker, Divertissement, which gets my vote for most eerily like a creepy Ives. All you Modern Music fans need to hear this, IMO, singularly visionary piece by Ibert; I'd almost say it's hallucinatory. What do you think?

The rest of the Fremaux set, the oddly chugging tugboat rhythms of Symphonie marine, and the three rousing Milhaud-meets-Honegger-meets-Roussel beer hall Tintin adventures, Bacchanale, Louisville Concerto, and Bostoniana. Ibert delivers quite the perfected blend of Fellini music, which makes sense since he did Compose for Films. I keep thinking of Amarcord when listening to this music!

The famous Escales (Ports of Call), which I 'may' have heard in the day, came across as the perfect melodrama unfolding, the first, 'Rome-Palerme', containing that ultra lush cinematic sweep that makes me feel like I'm in a noir in my car! The late Tropismes pour des amours imaginaires is a 25 minute peyton place drama from the '57s that is almost exactly the kind of nostalgia I like. Imagine if it had been written by Myaskovsky!

The rest of the program is complemented by Dutoit's Decca recording of the Flute Concerto and the three 'Tintin' pieces (I'm sorry, I don't mean it, don't be turned off!), which contains a piece I like as much as the Divertissement, the Symphonic suite (Paris), one of my favorites here.

Ibert's 'real' big piece (as opposed to the piece that got him famous) is his masterful Flute Concerto, and it is very nice and concise. I usually get it confused with Jolivet's equally scintillating work, but today I heard the perfect combination of Saint-Saens and Stravinsky. What do you think? Ibert has an equally, if not more, imposing Symphonie concertante for oboe, one for saxophone, and the afore mentioned, and often played (DuPre and Rostropovitch on EMI) cello concerto.

Everyone should check out the Brilliant 'Complete Chamber Music' set. It's as scattered as the Hyperion set of Poulenc's Complete Chamber Music, but just as wonderful, and even more varied. Though I find the opening 26 minute! solo harp suite thoroughly ignorable, I find myself always putting it one in the morning so I can have a clear half hour of harp music to peace out on.

Ibert's most substantial Chamber Work is the single String Quartet. I think it's perfect, evoking a breezy summer's day from the opening bar (almost like the opening to Tippett's No.2 (but not THAT good, haha!!)). The rest of the music is for all manner of combinations, including some late solo string works that are very nice to have together.

In all, Ibert emerges as the 'Seventh',... or 'Eighth',... or,... whatever,... and perfectly Invisible Man between Honegger, Roussel, Stravinsky, and Milhaud, with, I suppose, also Poulenc and Satie for good measure. Ibert is the neoclassic Stravinsky, with Honegger's cadence (though, without the bitterness and irony), and also Roussel's nautical ruggedness and the whimsy of the rest.
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Offline snyprrr

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2012, 09:50:29 AM »
When I googled Ibert, the "I-Bert" kiddie stuff came up first and overwhelmingly! Perhaps people don't realize... there's a Comper... named... Ibert ;)

...anyone?...

Bueller?,...
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Offline Jean Rivier

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2012, 08:50:27 AM »
Ibert is a composer that i love. Many times it has been called the seventh six, as it has much in common with some of these musicians and contemporary of them. He was a close friend of Honegger although their styles are different. Its marine symphony is a work that I never tire of hearing. It's a shame that no more compose symphonic music because I had a lot of talent and was a great orchestrator. Besides all works cited I would also recommend his symphonic poem " Ballad of Reading Gaol" inspired by the work of Oscar Wilde. It is a work of its first term and is a gem.

Offline snyprrr

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2012, 06:50:22 PM »
Ibert is a composer that i love. Many times it has been called the seventh six, as it has much in common with some of these musicians and contemporary of them. He was a close friend of Honegger although their styles are different. Its marine symphony is a work that I never tire of hearing. It's a shame that no more compose symphonic music because I had a lot of talent and was a great orchestrator. Besides all works cited I would also recommend his symphonic poem " Ballad of Reading Gaol" inspired by the work of Oscar Wilde. It is a work of its first term and is a gem.

Ibert definitely sounds like Honegger's friend! I was just enjoying the Ouverture de fete. Yes, Ibert has a very extrovert orchestration.
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Offline The new erato

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2012, 01:52:48 AM »
Superb disc:


Offline Jean Rivier

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #5 on: September 11, 2012, 08:56:56 AM »
Yes, it is a highly recommended album!

Offline snyprrr

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2012, 07:00:09 PM »
In all honesty, I hear a little of the spirit of Ives in Ibert, with the Divertissement as a prime example.
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Offline snyprrr

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2013, 07:26:38 PM »
Also listening to the EMI set of quirky Orchestral Works. 'Louisville Concerto' and 'Bostoniana'
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Offline springrite

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2013, 07:29:05 PM »
Wonderful composer to listen to. The Brits used to call him affectionately "Jackie Bear".
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Offline Daverz

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #9 on: September 27, 2013, 10:59:15 AM »
Divertissement is very raucous and fun.  I have it on Lp:






kyjo

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #10 on: September 27, 2013, 02:20:37 PM »
Is anyone else familiar with this disc?



It's an excellent recording through and through. Persée et Andromède is fast becoming one of my favorite operas. It shares not only similarities in length, but also in style with Ravel's L'enfant et les sortileges. This is not the light, neoclassical Ibert of the Divertissement. This is the Ibert of the Escales-lush, sensual and glitteringly scored. The symphonic poem La Ballade de la Geôle de Reading is even more fantastic. It is a dark, impulsive work that expertly combines drama and impressionistic sensuousness. I would not hesitate to call either work a masterpiece. The brief Sarabande pour Dulcinée that rounds out this winner of a disc is a touching miniature infused with a dreamy air of sadness akin to Ravel's own Pavane. If you don't own this disc, walk, don't run, to GET IT NOW!!!!! You won't be sorry. How this disc hasn't received more press is beyond me.

kyjo

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #11 on: September 28, 2013, 08:09:20 PM »
Is anyone else familiar with this disc?



It's an excellent recording through and through. Persée et Andromède is fast becoming one of my favorite operas. It shares not only similarities in length, but also in style with Ravel's L'enfant et les sortileges. This is not the light, neoclassical Ibert of the Divertissement. This is the Ibert of the Escales-lush, sensual and glitteringly scored. The symphonic poem La Ballade de la Geôle de Reading is even more fantastic. It is a dark, impulsive work that expertly combines drama and impressionistic sensuousness. I would not hesitate to call either work a masterpiece. The brief Sarabande pour Dulcinée that rounds out this winner of a disc is a touching miniature infused with a dreamy air of sadness akin to Ravel's own Pavane. If you don't own this disc, walk, don't run, to GET IT NOW!!!!! You won't be sorry. How this disc hasn't received more press is beyond me.

No one else familiar with this disc? John? Anybody?

Edit: I see Erato recommended it previously in this thread.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #12 on: September 28, 2013, 08:13:05 PM »
Kyle, I do not own that disc (yet), but do own all of the Ibert Marco Polo discs, which are very good (if memory serves me correctly). Outside of these recordings, I don't own that much Ibert. An EMI 2-CD set, Dutoit's excellent recording on Decca with the MSO, and Munch's famed performance of Escales. Will definitely investigate this recording based on your enthusiastic recommendation.
"I feel like a ghost wandering in a world grown alien. I cannot cast out the old way of writing and I cannot acquire the new. I have made an intense effort to feel the musical manner of today, but it will not come to me.” - Sergei Rachmaninov

kyjo

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #13 on: September 28, 2013, 08:15:19 PM »
Kyle, I do not own that disc (yet), but do own all of the Ibert Marco Polo discs, which are very good (if memory serves me correctly). Outside of these recordings, I don't own that much Ibert. An EMI 2-CD set, Dutoit's excellent recording on Decca with the MSO, and Munch's famed performance of Escales. Will definitely investigate this recording based on your enthusiastic recommendation.

It's probably my favorite Ibert CD in my collection. Considering you're an impressionistic nut like I am, this disc would be a hit with you, I would think! Timpani is such an underrated label IMO.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #14 on: September 28, 2013, 08:18:39 PM »
Considering you're an impressionistic nut like I am, this disc would be a hit with you, I would think!

I'm sure it would be. We do tread very similar territory, but, as we both have pointed out, with many differences as well, but that's to be expected.
"I feel like a ghost wandering in a world grown alien. I cannot cast out the old way of writing and I cannot acquire the new. I have made an intense effort to feel the musical manner of today, but it will not come to me.” - Sergei Rachmaninov

kyjo

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #15 on: September 28, 2013, 08:25:06 PM »
This is my second favorite Ibert disc:



This disc showcases all the different sides of Ibert's musical personality, from the lush, atmospheric Escales to the elegantly neo-classical Flute Concerto and the tuneful, rhythmic Bacchanale, Louisville Concerto and Bostoniana, which are more aggressive and dissonant in nature than most of Ibert's other works. The Bacchanale, especially, is a thrilling work. Dutoit and his Montreal band are, of course, in top form in this recording.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #16 on: September 28, 2013, 08:29:59 PM »
Of course, I own that disc naturally. :)
"I feel like a ghost wandering in a world grown alien. I cannot cast out the old way of writing and I cannot acquire the new. I have made an intense effort to feel the musical manner of today, but it will not come to me.” - Sergei Rachmaninov

Offline springrite

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #17 on: September 28, 2013, 08:34:20 PM »
Of course, I own that disc naturally. :)

As do I.

Regarding the Jackie Bear reference, he was for a long time the favorite French composer in England. That is why they gave him that name. I was curious when I heard about that on the radio and wanted to hear some Jackie Bear. The first CD I got was called "French Lollipops", just as a sampler. Now I listen more to this Dutoit CD and a couple of Frenchy one.
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Offline snyprrr

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #18 on: September 29, 2013, 06:29:47 AM »
Hey guys! ALERT!!

Listen to the Overture de fete on the EMI set. Listen around 7mins. for a very deep melody, almost Petterssonian or something, lasting about 2mins. So far the most Elgarian? Ibert I've heard. The Tropismes pour des amours imagines is also a very fine imaginary Film Music lasting 25mins. But do check out that middle section of the first piece.
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Offline snyprrr

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Re: L'Isle Ibert
« Reply #19 on: September 30, 2013, 11:27:58 AM »
Again, I'll point out Ibert's jaunty solo String Quartet, as a better place to go than the Francaix and the Tailleferre, and almost as invigorating as the Roussel.
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