Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 8439527 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104260 on: December 12, 2017, 09:29:41 AM »


Released in April I think, but it's only just come to my attention, this recording is a sort of "best of" survey Italian Ars Nova from Ensemble Perlado. Landini and Jacopo da Bologna and Nicolo da Perugia and all the usual suspects. A good selection, every song's a winner. All vocal, men and women, They bring great elegance, beauty and refinement.  I'd say that anyone who enjoys (eg) Gothic Voices and Orlando Consort will feel at home with the singing style I think - austerely expressive and spontaneously controlled, if you know what I mean.

Anyway, what I was really struck by is how natural the sound world of Trecento Italian music has become to me, more so than the 19th century romantic sound world. People have said here that medieval music is the hardest, the toughest to appreciate. But no, you learn how to enjoy it by listening to it, a thought as old as Aristotle.  The experience changes your perceptions.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104261 on: December 12, 2017, 09:45:12 AM »
Vaughan Williams Symphony No.6 E minor, Haitink conducting the LPO




Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104262 on: December 12, 2017, 10:45:09 AM »
Vaughan Williams Symphony No.5, Haitink conducting the LPO



Sarge

Superb.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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    Shostakovich, Frescobaldi, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Chopin, Haydn, Henning
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104263 on: December 12, 2017, 10:45:37 AM »
Vaughan Williams Symphony No.6 E minor, Haitink conducting the LPO
]http://photos.imageevent.com/sgtrock/july2010/RVWHaitinkLPO.jpg[/img]


Sarge

All right, so I repeat myself.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104264 on: December 12, 2017, 10:48:14 AM »
Elgar: Cockaigne Overture [Davis]....





A spirited performance of an exuberant work.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104265 on: December 12, 2017, 11:08:42 AM »
While MDG is on sale over at MDT, I should ask, how is this one?
I really enjoyed it.... obviously Massenet piano music exists within a tradition of the salon style but in quality and inventiveness it’s several cuts above average and obviously the piano playing is good too. A lot of fun overall.

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104266 on: December 12, 2017, 11:09:45 AM »
I really enjoyed it.... obviously Massenet piano music exists within a tradition of the salon style but in quality and inventiveness it’s several cuts above average and obviously the piano playing is good too. A lot of fun overall.
Thanks! As a shameless Moszkowski etc. fan I will definitely add this to the cart.

Offline Wanderer

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104267 on: December 12, 2017, 11:28:39 AM »
.


Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104268 on: December 12, 2017, 11:47:29 AM »
I really enjoyed it.... obviously Massenet piano music exists within a tradition of the salon style but in quality and inventiveness it’s several cuts above average and obviously the piano playing is good too. A lot of fun overall.

Writing first-class salon music is a far better achievement than writing second- or third-class symphonies, and the result is much less boring.

"Salon" music is vastly underrated while "serious" music is vastly overrated.
"Beauty must appeal to the senses, must provide us with immediate enjoyment, must impress us or insinuate itself into us without any effort on our part." - Claude Debussy

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104269 on: December 12, 2017, 12:22:57 PM »
Basically inclined to agree. The piano music of composers like Massenet, Chabrier, Moszkowski, Gottschalk, Hahn, Rossini, Balakirev etc—and arguably Albéniz, Granados, Fauré, Poulenc, Grieg, Tchaikovsky also belong to the tradition despite being famous as “serious” composers for some reason—is an important tradition as valuable as the Schumann/Chopin/Brahms/Szymanowski/Medtner/Rachmaninov tradition of virtuoso pianism and sometimes more fun to listen to.

Online Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104270 on: December 12, 2017, 12:28:40 PM »


On my wishlist, calling my name!  :)

I guess I'm waiting for a reissue of both volumes as a single set, but with BIS you never know....  ::)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104271 on: December 12, 2017, 12:31:26 PM »
Basically inclined to agree. The piano music of composers like Massenet, Chabrier, Moszkowski, Gottschalk, Hahn, Rossini, Balakirev etc—and arguably Albéniz, Granados, Fauré, Poulenc, Grieg, Tchaikovsky also belong to the tradition despite being famous as “serious” composers for some reason—is an important tradition as valuable as the Schumann/Chopin/Brahms/Szymanowski/Medtner/Rachmaninov tradition of virtuoso pianism and sometimes more fun to listen to.
Yesterday I listened to a bunch of the Grieg Lyric Pieces books straight through, rather than pianists' "highlight" albums, and goddamn, what a never-ending stream of delights that series is. Appreciate this post.

Offline San Antone

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104272 on: December 12, 2017, 12:52:11 PM »
On my wishlist, calling my name!  :)

I guess I'm waiting for a reissue of both volumes as a single set, but with BIS you never know....  ::)

Q

I enjoyed it very much and feel confident you will too.   :)



TD


Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104273 on: December 12, 2017, 01:02:58 PM »
Basically inclined to agree. The piano music of composers like Massenet, Chabrier, Moszkowski, Gottschalk, Hahn, Rossini, Balakirev etc—and arguably Albéniz, Granados, Fauré, Poulenc, Grieg, Tchaikovsky also belong to the tradition despite being famous as “serious” composers for some reason—is an important tradition as valuable as the Schumann/Chopin/Brahms/Szymanowski/Medtner/Rachmaninov tradition of virtuoso pianism and sometimes more fun to listen to.

Chopin was himself a salon music composer. And contrary to received wisdom, he never rejected Kalkbrenner's help --- actually, the latter was instrumental in bringing the former to the attention of the Parisian public.

History is written by the victors applies to music as well.

Plus: I would definitely add Mozart (and Haydn as well) to your list.

"Beauty must appeal to the senses, must provide us with immediate enjoyment, must impress us or insinuate itself into us without any effort on our part." - Claude Debussy

Offline Mahlerian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104274 on: December 12, 2017, 01:05:46 PM »
Chopin was himself a salon music composer. And contrary to received wisdom, he never rejected Kalkbrenner's help --- actually, the latter was instrumental in bringing the former to the attention of the Parisian public.

History is written by the victors applies to music as well.

Plus: I would definitely add Mozart (and Haydn as well) to your list.

Yes, but like Chopin, their music is quite serious, both in intent and in terms of its expansion of the possibilities of the art.   ;)

TD:
Power: Missa Alma Redemptoris
Hilliard Ensemble

« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 01:07:59 PM by Mahlerian »
"l do not consider my music as atonal, but rather as non-tonal. I feel the unity of all keys. Atonal music by modern composers admits of no key at all, no feeling of any definite center." - Arnold Schoenberg

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104275 on: December 12, 2017, 01:14:17 PM »
Superb.

All right, so I repeat myself.

Oh, yeah, Haitink's 5 & 6 are superb. Deep, introspective...makes the climaxes much more powerful when they do happen. The big tune at the end of the first movement of 6 is intensely moving. Superb sonics too.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104276 on: December 12, 2017, 01:17:41 PM »
Yes, but like Chopin, their music is quite serious, both in intent and in terms of its expansion of the possibilities of the art.   ;)

How do you know that Mozart's or Haydn's or Chopin's goal was to "expand the possibilities of the art"? Did they themselves say so (if they did, please quote the primary sources), or is this an ex post facto ideological concoction? Supplementary, what is so "serious" about the tons of divertimenti / serenades / cassations produced by Mozart and Haydn?




"Beauty must appeal to the senses, must provide us with immediate enjoyment, must impress us or insinuate itself into us without any effort on our part." - Claude Debussy

Offline Mahlerian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104277 on: December 12, 2017, 01:26:33 PM »
How do you know that Mozart's or Haydn's or Chopin's goal was to "expand the possibilities of the art"? Did they themselves say so (if they did, please quote the primary sources), or is this an ex post facto ideological concoction?

That is not what I said.  I did not say that they sought to expand the possibilities of the art, but rather that they did so.  I don't know what you think my "ideology" is, nor am I sure how such a thing would matter in this instance.  As I've said before, I'm a composer, and I enjoy music for its beauty and meaning.  I am grateful to Mozart and Chopin and Haydn for having expanded music in the way they did, and for being excellent models with much to teach us to this day.

Supplementary, what is so "serious" about the tons of divertimenti / serenades / cassations produced by Mozart and Haydn?

Their craftsmanship, of course, which is (in mature works) of the highest quality.  In intent, both composers (and Chopin) wrote music full of unpredictability, harmonic richness, and emotional depth.  These things exist even in their ostensibly lighter works, and this in spite of the occasions for which they were produced (background listening at the salon or a dinner party, for example).

At any rate, Mozart and Haydn would have considered their most characteristic works to be the operas, the string quartets/quintets, the concertos, and the (later, in Mozart's case) symphonies, rather than the occasional pieces you mentioned.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 01:32:19 PM by Mahlerian »
"l do not consider my music as atonal, but rather as non-tonal. I feel the unity of all keys. Atonal music by modern composers admits of no key at all, no feeling of any definite center." - Arnold Schoenberg

Offline listener

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104278 on: December 12, 2017, 01:37:32 PM »
arrived today, the price had dropped to $8.50 -ish, back up to $21. --  so I added it to get free shipping as well for a low-cost Christmas gift I'm giving

a recital on a new Klais organ in the Auditorium maximus at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum played by Johannes Unger
4 manuals and pedal, 82 stops, 6000 pipes including two 32-ft.
some of the usual display pieces and some novelties
BACH: Sonata in d, BWV527   P&F in C BWV 541    LISZT: Weinen klagen...   WIDOR: that Toccata     MESSIAEN: Dieu parmi nous
SAINT-SAËNS: Fantaisie 2 op.101
Ludwig NIELSEN: Fantasie on "Die Glocken des Nidarosdomes"  William LLOYD WEBBER (father of more known sons) Prelude  from "Three Recital Pieces"
an enjoyable disc on the Querstand label with good documentation

"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #104279 on: December 12, 2017, 01:45:26 PM »
Aldo Ciccolini assembles a program of waltzes by Chabrier, Chopin, Pierné, Grieg, Satie, Séverac, Schubert, Debussy, Massenet, Sibelius, Fauré, Brahms, and Tailleferre: