Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 6735103 times)

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kishnevi

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109280 on: February 21, 2018, 06:15:28 PM »
TD


Speculation prompted this purchase.
I like it...but I'm not sure I would recommend this to anyone.
Ritter thought the little he had heard of this composer suggested an epigone of Rodrigo.  The Spanish composer I thought I heard echoes of is De Falla, mixed in to the generic neoRomantic composers of the late 20th century. There is little to cue the listener in to the fact the two works date fron 2015 and 2011. I think a number of GMGers would be pleased with this CD, and a number of GMGers a bit bored.  I intend to get more of this composer, but the rest of you will just have to decide for yourselves.

Second listen. General impression is the same, but I now realize there is a lot of flamenco influence in both works.

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109281 on: February 21, 2018, 07:02:30 PM »



From the DHM long box.  The first disc of Bach's Lute Suites.  As with Lutz Kirchhof's recording for Vivarte, the playing and music are both excellent.  I doubt I spin this often, and this is one area where Bach may not be the best the baroque has to offer. 
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109282 on: February 21, 2018, 07:34:12 PM »
Last disc from the Gustav Leonhardt Edition:



Very nice. It helps that it contains two bona fide hits from the French Baroque, Marin Marais’ La sonnerie de Sainte Geneviève du Mont à Paris and his Tombeau de Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe.

Offline Gordo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109283 on: February 21, 2018, 07:53:03 PM »
Last disc from the Gustav Leonhardt Edition:



Very nice. It helps that it contains two bona fide hits from the French Baroque, Marin Marais’ La sonnerie de Sainte Geneviève du Mont à Paris and his Tombeau de Monsieur de Sainte-Colombe.

I think you're being very cautious. It's a wonderful disk!  :)

Top-notch sound quality for the age, in addition.
Musica lætitiæ comes medicina dolorum
(Music is a companion to joy and a medicine for pains)

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109284 on: February 21, 2018, 08:15:17 PM »
Symphony No. 4, “Deliciæ Basiliensis”:



I’m not sure why I don’t listen to Honegger’s symphonies more often. This is great stuff.
“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109285 on: February 21, 2018, 09:06:46 PM »
Violin Sonata No. 2:

“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline Ken B

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109286 on: February 21, 2018, 09:14:19 PM »
Mozart
Horn trio
Gaudier Ensemble
Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline RebLem

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109287 on: February 21, 2018, 11:04:04 PM »
On Wednesday, 21 FEB 2018, I listened to  3 CDs.


1)  Franz Schubert (1797-1828):  |Tr. 1-4, Symphony 4 in C Minor, D. 417 "Tragic" (1816) (30'55)  |Tr. 5-8, Symphony 2 in A Flat Major, D. 125 (1815) (32'43)--Jos Van Immerseel, cond., Anima Eterna Brugge.  Rec. Tilburg Concertzaal 1-2 DEC 1996 (4th), 29-30 JAN 1997 (2nd).  CD 2 of a 4 CD Outhere set of the complete Schubert symphonies by these forces. 

These are excellent performances, but not as good, it seems to me, as the Beecham or Marriner recordings of these works.  This set does have superb documentation, and a thick booklet explaining Immerseel's approach to these works.


2)  Maurice Duruflé (1902-86):  |Tr. 1, Prelude on the Introit of the Epiphany, Op. 13 (1961) (2'38)  |Tr. 2-3, Prelude et fugue sur le nom d'Alain, Op. 7 (1942) (11'32)  |Tr. 4-6, Suite for Organ, Op. 5 (1933) (23'38)  |Tr. 7, Scherzo for Organ, Op. 2 (1926) (5'49)  |Tr. 8-10, Prelude, Adagio and Chorale Variations on "Veni Creator", Op. 4 (1930) (23'57)  |Tr. 11, Fugue on the Carillon of the Cathedral of Soissons, Op. 12 (c. 1947) (3'11)--John Scott, organist, Organ of St. Paul's Cathedral, London and the Gentlemen of the St. Paul Cathedral Choir in Tr. 10--rec. 10-12 APR 1989 & 28 JUN 1989.  A hyperion CD.

The documentation in the booklet, while more than adequate, is only 8 pages long, generous for most companies, but a little skimpy for hyperion, and 2 of those pages describe only the registrations of the organ, and one consists of a b & w photo of the organist.  Excellent performances.


3)  N Miaskovsky (1881-1950): |Tr. 1-2, Symphony 2 in C Minor, Op. 11 (1911) (46'45)  |Tr. 3, Symphony 13 in B Minor, Op. 36 (1933) (20'26)  |Tr. 4, Slavonic Rhapsody in D Minor, Op. 71 (1946) (11'32)--Evgeny Svetlanov, cond., Russian Federation Symphony Orch., CD 12 of a 16 CD set of all the Miaskovsky symphonies + some selected other orchestral works by these forces Rec. 1991-3 in the Large Hall of the Tchaikovsky Conservatory, Moscow. Issued by Warner Records.

Notes on these works from an online essay by Eric Schissel @ https://kith.org/jimmosk/schissel.html
sym. 2 in c# minor, op. 11. a sequential opening tune of memorable rhythm opens a sonata-form well-described as Tschaikovskian by Ikonnikov, beginning and ending in c# minor. The a minor second movement opens uncertainly with a c-c# semitone before its main matter, described by the same writer as Scriabin-influenced. The central section of this slow movement contains a quite fast page. The last pages of the slow movement are sparely orchestrated in the extreme. They turn to A major, and in what is perhaps a sort of bow to Scriabin's 3rd piano sonata, a transposition of the main theme of the 3rd movement picks up speed and introduces the 3rd movement- which Ikonnikov describes as Miaskovskian. The main theme is extremely angular. The ending leaps off the page- a chord with c# minor submerged in several leading tones and tritones played loudly and tremolo for several bars, then an .emphatic. low c#.

sym. 13. It has been described as being nearly as bleak as Sibelius' 4th symphony. It has little in common with symphony no. 12 (I do not know symphony no. 14 but from what I know about it, symphony no. 13 also has little in common with it). It is in a single movement, with slow introduction (and prominent drum tattoo), main theme, D-flat major second theme, development leading to a b-natural-minor fugato, and recapitulation and coda, finally ending on a b-flat minor chord with added notes a and c, the drum tattoo accompanying the final chord.

As for the Rhapsody, I found this review in Fanfare review by Peter J Rabinowitz, quoted in ArchivMusic.com:  "Svetlanov can’t convince me that the late Slavonic Rhapsody —despite its impressively brooding opening and its powerful conclusions—is anything but stylistically disjointed. While it’s more sober than the title might lead you to expect, Myaskovsky was rarely at his best using folksy material, and the half-hearted and repetitious bell-drenched climax about two-thirds of the way in suggests that he was having trouble maintaining his interest in the project."
"Don't drink and drive; you might spill it."--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father.

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109288 on: February 21, 2018, 11:08:44 PM »
Morning listening:



Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Turner

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109289 on: February 21, 2018, 11:51:03 PM »
Paul Juon, the piano trios /Altenberg Trio /2CD

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109290 on: February 22, 2018, 12:02:13 AM »
sym. 13. It has been described as being nearly as bleak as Sibelius' 4th symphony. It has little in common with symphony no. 12 (I do not know symphony no. 14 but from what I know about it, symphony no. 13 also has little in common with it).
Myaskovsky often wrote "official" works that could gain approval from the Stalinist artistic censorship apparatus in tandem with more "personal" works for the drawer, which might sometimes not see performance for a long time. The Symphony No.12 is one such "official" work written to depict a collective farm, whereas the Symphony No.13 (probably his darkest work) is often seen as a personal reaction to the Great Terror of the 30s when hundreds of intellectuals were imprisoned or killed, including many people he knew and was friendly with. (Myaskovsky's own music was officially denounced and suppressed in the 1940s, so that he spent his final years in fear of meeting a similar fate, and he was not rehabilitated until after his death.)

Offline Monsieur Croche

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109291 on: February 22, 2018, 12:15:21 AM »
Stravinsky ~ Concerto in D for strings (1946).
A standout  - stand up performance of a favored neoclassical piece, because of which it is highly engaging to watch full screen.
[The Arioso is -- a personal term of endearment -- "off-the-wallpaper" highly Italianate - lyric and balletic, in a way that makes me melt, giggle a little, and smile, utterly complacent; the Rondo very much gets back to rigorous and earnest business.]
I. vivace
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YmS0fUASrW8
II. Arioso & Rondo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p6Yq3B5Nd_E
~ I'm all for personal expression; it just has to express something to me. ~

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109292 on: February 22, 2018, 12:19:11 AM »

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109293 on: February 22, 2018, 02:08:06 AM »


Marvelous, ravishingly beautiful, ultra-Romantic piano trios, full of passion and melancholy, interesting ideas, arresting moments and glorious tunes. Committed, white-hot performances in excellent sound. Unreservedly recommended.

Now playing:

The golden mean, the truth, is no longer recognized or valued. To win applause one must write stuff so simple that a coachman might sing it, or so incomprehensible that it pleases simply because no sensible man can comprehend it. - Mozart

Offline Pjotr

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109294 on: February 22, 2018, 03:38:54 AM »
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
Aristotle.

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109295 on: February 22, 2018, 04:21:28 AM »
Karl Henning's Nuhro: if you ever wanted proof of Karl's musical genius, here it is!

I used an excerpt from Nuhro yesterday in a Lenten project for my school: I received some queries from both students and faculty: "What was that one piece called?"   0:)

Curiously, even though I myself have listened three times to it in toto, the YouTube counter stays stuck at 92: does it not count a repeat visitor?

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g</a>

Joining everyone else in liking this.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109296 on: February 22, 2018, 04:26:58 AM »
The last discs of this box of 52.
For me not the success I hoped for, but that's really personal, and not a reflection of the music.
I finally conquered this mega box.

http://walboi.blogspot.nl/2018/02/strauss-johann-ii-1825-1899-complete_26.html?spref=tw
I enjoyed Disc 51, precisely because we don't hear the choral versions all that often.
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109297 on: February 22, 2018, 04:35:49 AM »
The golden mean, the truth, is no longer recognized or valued. To win applause one must write stuff so simple that a coachman might sing it, or so incomprehensible that it pleases simply because no sensible man can comprehend it. - Mozart

Offline Pjotr

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #109298 on: February 22, 2018, 04:41:13 AM »
I enjoyed Disc 51, precisely because we don't hear the choral versions all that often.

I simply dislike the choral contributions Neal, but that is a very personal opinion. I have no judgement in the negative about these compositions. :)
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
Aristotle.