Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 7713125 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111100 on: March 18, 2018, 12:33:38 PM »
And that's on my wishlist now, darnyou!  ;D

Good luck finding it for a good price. It’s OOP and quite expensive. :-\

Thread duty -

Ives
Violin Sonata No. 4, “Children’s Day at the Camp Meeting”
Gregory Fulkerson
Robert Shannon


“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111101 on: March 18, 2018, 01:16:10 PM »
Excellent performances and sound.

"Muß es sein?"
"Es muß sein!"

Online Zeus

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111102 on: March 18, 2018, 01:41:48 PM »
Blažíková - Vienna 1709
Hana Blažíková, Ensemble Tourbillon, Petr Wagner
Accent


"There is no progress in art, any more than there is progress in making love. There are simply different ways of doing it." – Emmanuel Radnitzky (Man Ray)

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111103 on: March 18, 2018, 02:47:11 PM »
Martinů
Symphony No. 5, H 310
Neeme Järvi
Bamberg Symphony Orchestra


“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111104 on: March 18, 2018, 03:48:13 PM »
Rakowski was one of Milton Babbitt's pupils, but his music is less forbiddingly cerebral than Babbitt's--it's rather jazzy at times. Demonstration-worthy sound.

"Muß es sein?"
"Es muß sein!"

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111105 on: March 18, 2018, 04:23:35 PM »


Frederick Delius, the Requiem. I will leave A Mass of Life for another occasion. These two works are just too much when heard in succession, an overdose of the sublime.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111106 on: March 18, 2018, 04:30:08 PM »
Speaking of the sublime...

Debussy
Suite bergamasque
Seong-Jin Cho


“It must be beautiful, or it wouldn't be worth the effort.” - Bohuslav Martinů

Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111107 on: March 18, 2018, 05:40:49 PM »
After listening to one of Babbitt's pupils, I thought I'd return to the teacher. Haven't listened to this in a while--whew--it's intensely contrapuntal, but not really too gratingly dissonant. Two orchestras deemed Babbitt's piece unplayable, so Schuller put together a string orchestra to prove them wrong. The live recording has some extraneous sounds, but the actual recording quality is quite good.

"Muß es sein?"
"Es muß sein!"

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111108 on: March 18, 2018, 06:00:13 PM »
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111109 on: March 18, 2018, 10:31:38 PM »
Morning listening:


Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline RebLem

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111110 on: March 18, 2018, 11:19:08 PM »
On Sunday, 18 MAR 2018, I listened to one CD. I had planned on listening to many more, but we had a terrific wind storm here in Albuquerque today, and for a brief second in the early afternoon, it knocked out my power. Everything came back up immediately, but it shut down my stereo, and I felt I had to give it a rest. So I did, and spent some time catching up on DVRed things instead and sleeping. My kidney function is down to 20% now, and it makes me want to sleep almost as much as a baby. Anyway, what I listened to was this:

CD 4 of the 10 CD SONY set named "Leopold Stokowski: The Complete Columbia Stereo Recordings." Charles Edward Ives (1874-1954): Tr. 1-4, Symphony 4 (1916) (30'47) |Tr. 5, Robert Browning Overture (1914, rev. 1942) (23'01) |Tr. 6-9, Four Songs for Chorus & Orchestra (15'54): 6, Majority, or, The Masses (1921) (4'29), 7, They are There (A War Song March) (3'11), 8, Election (It Strikes Me That) (4'07), 9, Lincoln, the Great Commoner (4'07)--American Symphony Orch., Members of the Schola Cantorum, NY, Hugh Ross, dir. (Tr. 4), Gregg Smith Singers & Ithaca College Concert Choir (Tr. 6-9)--Rec. Manhattan Center, NYC, 29-30 APR 1965 (Tr. 1-4), 21 DEC 1966 (Tr. 5), 18 OCT 1967 (Tr. 6-9).

The most radically dissonant work here is the Robert Browning Overture, the songs are the most conventional. The Symphony is somewhere in between. It has been a long time since I heard this Symphony. My first recording of it was this performance in another incarnation, as an LP. I have and have listened to others, too, including the Michael Tilson Thomas recording. It seemed just radical and off the wall when I first heard it, but now, after listening to dissonant music from many composers, it seems closer to the mainstream to me. It is filled with many references to various anthems and patriotic songs, as much of Ives' music is.

For the Robert Browning Overture, see http://www.musicweb-international.com/…/WK_Robert_Browning_…

At first, I thought the catchall title "Four Songs for Chorus & Orchestra" was a separate work consisting of four songs. They are not. They are just individual songs which the editors of this disc have chosen to group together and give a title. They are listed as individual works in Ives catalogue. All of these songs are about our common space as a nation. They are about democracy and the American political system, with an optimistic edge to them. The second one, a so called war anthem, while its words confirm the subject, have more of an air of a college football fight song that a war march. Lincoln, the Great Commoner, is a poem by Edwin Markham. The three others are songs to texts by Ives himself:

Majority (The Masses)

The Masses! The Masses! The Masses have toiled,
 Behold the works of the World!
 The Masses are thinking,
 Whence comes the thought of the World!
 The Masses are singing,
 Whence comes the Art of the World!
 The Masses are yearning,
 Whence comes the hope of the World.
 The Masses are dreaming,
 Whence comes the visions of God!
 God's in His Heaven,
 All will be well with the World!

They Are There, A War Song March

There's a time in many a life,
 When it's do though facing death
 And our soldier boys will do their part
 That people can live in a world where all will have a say.
 They're conscious always of their country's aim,
 Which is Liberty for all.
 Hip hip hooray you'll hear them say
 As they go to the fighting front.

Brave boys are now in action
 They are there, they will help to free the world
 They are fighting for the right
 But when it comes to might,
 They are there, they are there, they are there,
 As the Allies beat up all the warhogs,
 The boys'll be there fighting hard
 A-a-and then the world will shout
 The battle cry of Freedom.
 Tenting on a new camp ground.

When we're through this cursed war,
 All started by a sneaking gouger,
 Making slaves of men
 Then let all the people rise,
 And stand together in brave, kind Humanity.
 Most wars are made by small stupid
 Selfish bossing groups
 While the people have no say.
 But there'll come a day
 Hip hip Hooray
 When they'll smash all dictators to the wall.

Then it's build a people's world nation Hooray
 Ev'ry honest country free to live its own native life.
 They will stand for the right,
 But if it comes to might,
 They are there, they are there, they are there.
 Then the people, not just politicians
 Will rule their own lands and lives.
 Then you'll hear the whole universe
 Shouting the battle cry of Freedom.
 Tenting on a new camp ground.
 Tenting on a new camp ground

The Election (It Strikes Me That)

"It strikes me that some men and women got tired of a big job;
 but, over there our men did not quit.
 They fought and died that better things might be!
 Perhaps some who stayed at home are beginning to forget and to quit.
 The pocketbook and certain little things talked loud and noble,
 And got in the way; too many readers go by the headlines,
 party men will muddle up the facts,
 So a good many citizens voted as grandpa always did,
 or thought a change for the sake of change seemed natural enough.
 "It's raining, lets throw out the weather man,
 Kick him out! Kick him out! Kick him out! Kick him out! Kick him!"
 Prejudice and politics, and the stand-patters came in strong,
 and yelled, "Slide back! Now you're safe, that's the easy way!"
 Then the timid smiled and looked relieved,
 "We've got enough to eat, to hell with ideals!"
 All the old women, male and female, had [their] day today,
 and the hog-heart came out of his hole,
 But he won't stay out long, God always drives him back!
 Oh Captain, my Captain!
 a heritage we've thrown away;
 But we'll find it again, my Captain, Captain, oh my Captain!"

Lincoln, the Great Commoner

 And so he came from the prairie cabin to the Capitol,
 One fair ideal led our chieftain on,
 He built the rail pile as he built the State,
 The conscience testing every stroke,
 To make his deed the measure of the man . . .
 So came our Captain with the mighty heart;
And when the step of earthquake shook the house,
 Wrenching rafters from their ancient hold,
 He held the ridgepole
 up
 And spiked again the rafters of the Home.
 He held his place
 He held the long purpose like a growing tree,
 Held on thro’ blame and faltered not at praise,
 And when he fell in whirlwind,
 He went down as when a Kingly Cedar green with boughs
 Goes down with a great shout, upon the hills!
"Don't drink and drive; you might spill it."--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111111 on: March 19, 2018, 01:41:38 AM »
Concerti RV 88, RV 94 & RV 107....





This is wonderful music of a particular character is very engaging and appealing. It is also very well played.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.


Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111113 on: March 19, 2018, 02:35:52 AM »
Hummel:





Trumpet Concerto
Mandolin Concerto
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111114 on: March 19, 2018, 03:21:15 AM »
JC Bach: Flute Concerto in G major [Brown/Halstead]....





This work has a wonderfully lyrical, fluid and flowing line to it, particularly the wonderful first movement.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111115 on: March 19, 2018, 04:23:20 AM »
Beautiful music



Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111116 on: March 19, 2018, 04:46:08 AM »
Maiden-Listen Mondays!:

Zemlinsky
Symphony in Bb (1897)
Radio Symphony Berlin
Chailly


Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
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nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111117 on: March 19, 2018, 04:53:27 AM »
Puccini: La Boheme, Act 2 [Votto]....


The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111118 on: March 19, 2018, 05:30:39 AM »
Bach

Motetten and Trauer-ode BWV 198 Lass,Fürstin,Lass noch einen Strahl


Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #111119 on: March 19, 2018, 05:34:10 AM »



Richter's K282 starts with an Adagio that seems to be almost perfectly paced, with an easy flow and lyricism, and trills, in particular, that sound just right.  One could perhaps say that it sounds just a touch too swift.  Or not.  Richter plays the minuets a bit slower, relatively, but he delivers fun and lovely playing, though it might be possible to want slightly more insistent left hand playing, and his Allegro is fast, dynamically varied but contained, and just good fun. 
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations