Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 6902787 times)

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Offline MN Dave

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112880 on: April 16, 2018, 04:24:52 PM »
A Nathan Milstein box.

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112881 on: April 16, 2018, 04:35:15 PM »
Sounds like your friend needs to join GMG! He’d fit right in with the other wackos here just fine. :) I absolutely adore Berg’s Violin Concerto, but can’t listen to it too often for the reason you mentioned. I hope one of those performances he burned you of the Berg’s VC was the Mutter/Levine. This is my favorite performance.

Wacko is right. My friend is a real Bruckner nut. He contributes all kinds of stuff on John Berky’s web site. Bruckner was himself quite an original, and it seems to have struck my friend’s taste for the curious and the bizarre.

And yes the Mutterlicious is in the pile  :D.

Offline Ken B

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112882 on: April 16, 2018, 04:51:40 PM »
Ravel
Rapsodie Espagnole
VPO Silvestri
Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline MN Dave

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112883 on: April 16, 2018, 05:06:32 PM »
Rachmaninov - Trio Elegiaque No. 1 in G Minor
The Borodin Trio  0:)

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112884 on: April 16, 2018, 05:09:55 PM »
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112885 on: April 16, 2018, 05:28:10 PM »
Wacko is right. My friend is a real Bruckner nut. He contributes all kinds of stuff on John Berky’s web site. Bruckner was himself quite an original, and it seems to have struck my friend’s taste for the curious and the bizarre.

And yes the Mutterlicious is in the pile  :D.

Your friend would fit right in with the other Bruckner nuts on this forum. Personally, I wouldn’t call myself a worshipper, or ’nut’, of this composer or anything of that kind of extreme. I can only take his music in small doses. Symphonies Nos. 6, 8, & 9 are my favorites. My favorite Germanic composers are a bit more modern (compared to Bruckner): Mahler, The Second Viennese School (Schoenberg, Berg, Webern), Hindemith, and Hartmann.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 06:37:28 PM by Mirror Image »
“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline RebLem

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112886 on: April 16, 2018, 05:37:27 PM »
On Monday, 16 APR 2018, I listened to 4 CDs.


1)  Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958):  |Tr. 1-4.  A Sea Symphony (# 1) (1910) (65'43)--Andre Previn, cond., London Symphony Orchestra & Chorus, Heather Harper, soprano, John Shirley-Quirk, baritone.  Text: Walt Whitman.  This is CD 1 of a 6 CD RCA set of all 9 VW Symphonies + a number of other orchestral and concerted works by VW, with the LSO conducted by Previn.

Per Wikipedia,
"A Sea Symphony (1910), the only one of the series to include a part for full choir, differs from most earlier choral symphonies in that the choir sings in all the movements.  The extent to which it is a true symphony has been debated; in a 2013 study, Alain Frogley describes it as a hybrid work, with elements of symphony, oratorio and cantata.  Its sheer length—about eighty minutes—was unprecedented for an English symphonic work, and within its thoroughly tonal construction it contains harmonic dissonances that pre-echo the early works of Stravinsky which were soon to follow."
This work is one of Homeric proportions.  It is so unrelievedly grand that it is diffucult to get a sense of drama out of it,  a sense of a beginning, a middle, a climax, and a denouement.  Although the chorus appears in all four movements, the two soloists are absent from the third movement, a scherzo.


2)  Francis Poulenc (1899-1963):  |Tr. 1-15.  La Voix Humaine (The Human Voice), a one act monodrama (1959) (42'48).  Text: Jean Cocteau--Jose Serebrier, cond., Adelaide Symphony Orchestra, Carole Farley, soprano--Rec. SEP 1981 in ABC (Australian Broadcasting Co.) Studios, Adelaide--Phoenix Label, licensed from CHANDOS.

The story is ridiculously simple.  A jilted woman, rejected by her lover in favor of another woman, desperately and unsuccessfully tries to win him back.  The record jacket and the booklet call this a one act opera.  It is also a one character opera.  That is why Wikipedia, more properly, in my view, calls it a monodrama, which is why I have chosen to call it that the head note. 
This is sung in the original French by Carole Farley, the featured performer on this release.  Her name appears on the cover in larger type than any other name, and a picture of her in mid performance takes up about 3/4 of the front cover of the rather thick booklet.  It had adequate information in it.  A one page descriptive essay of the work is first, then 11 double pages of text, French on one side, English on the other, and then, on the second to last page, the last 4 lines of the text in both French and English, and on the inside back cover, advertising for other Phoenix Records releases.  The back cover contains an essay on the career of Carole Farley.  She is an American soprano who first came to public attention when she became the youngest lead soprano, at age 21, in the history of the Cologne Opera doing her debut in the extraordinarily demanding role of Lulu in Alban Berg's opera.  She made her MET debut in that same role, and various critics commented that she performed as easily as if it had been written by Puccini.  She is also married to Jose Serebrier, the conductor on this and many other productions.
I'd also like to take this opportunity to point out that Jose Serebrier was the conductor on what I consider the most important release thus far of the 21st century--the first recording ever, and so far, I believe, the only recording, of Shostakovich's complete ballet, The Golden Age (aka as The Age of Gold).  The Suite from that ballet is well known, but not the whole ballet.  Once you have heard the complete production, you will understand why.  It is Commie agitprop which portrays ordinary white workers in capitalist countries as the spearhead of opposition to the evil racist depredations of the capitalist class.  Anyone who thinks that's the way racism works is not living in the real world.  Despite that, though, the ballet contains a lot of beautiful music and interesting action you don't get in the suite, and its addition to the catalogue was enormously important to me--and, I think, should be for you, too!


3)  CD 2 of the 10 CD album entitled "Carl Schuricht: The Complete Decca Recordings."   |L.V. Beethoven (1770-1827):  ||Tr. 1-4.   Symphony 5 in C Minor, Op. 67 (30'02)  |Tr. 5.  Coriolan Overture, Op. 62 (1807) (7'37)--Paris Conservatory Orch., rec. La Maison de la Mutualite, Paris, 10-12 JUN 1949 (Tr. 1-4), London Philhamonic Orch., Kingsway Hall, London, 11 JUL 1948 (Tr. 5).

The technicians here have done a wonderful job of presenting these productions from the late 1940's in a modern light with as close to modern sound as can be managed.  Some hiss from degraded masters remains, but this is truly glorious sound for that period.  And the Fifth Symphony is an easy symphony to get right.  At least, I find that damn nearly everyone who tries gets it right enough to make it exciting.  But I definitely prefer Schuricht's later stereo remake far better than this one.


4)  L.V. Beethoven (1770-1827):  CD 2 in the 5 CD Memories label set of the symphonies conducted by Pierre Monteux with various orchestras.  |Tr. 1-4.  Symphony 2 in D Major, Op. 36 (31'04)--Boston Symphony Orch., rec live @ Tanglewood 12 AUG 1960  |Tr. 5-8.  Symphony 7 in A Major, Op. 92 (34'51)--NBC Symphony Orch., rec. live Studio 8H, NYC, 15 NOV  1953.

First of all, let me clear something up.  I "made a mistook," as my mother would have said, when I wrote recently that Monteux's DECCA set of the Beethoven Symphonies was entirely with the Wiener Phil. except for the 9th which is with the London Symphony.  A closer look reveals that only Symphonies 1, 3, 6, & 8 are with the Wiener Phil.  All the others are with the LSO.

I hear a fair amount of hiss on these recordings, but other than that, the recording of the Second Symphony is reasonably good, though, I must say, not as good as the sound DECCA gets from Schuricht recordings of more thana decade earlier.  And with the Seventh, we have a better orchestra, but a worse venue, the infamous Studio 8H, and seven years earlier to boot.  The result is that the sound in the Seventh is significantly worse than that of the Second.  And, it sounds a bit rushed at times.  Not one of Monteux's better efforts, in short, but let us remember that Monteux never authorized their release, either.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 10:11:26 PM by RebLem »
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112887 on: April 16, 2018, 06:07:36 PM »
Barber
Cello Concerto, Op. 22
Anne Gastinel, cello
Justin Brown, conductor
City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra




I figured it was time to throw in a little orchestral music for the day. One of the finest accounts of Barber’s Cello Concerto I know (I never cared much for this disc’s coupling, Elgar’s Cello Concerto). Another fine account of Barber’s CC is with Christian Poltéra (on BIS with Andrew Litton).
“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112888 on: April 16, 2018, 06:36:28 PM »
Ravel
Miroirs
Tharaud


“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112889 on: April 16, 2018, 06:46:53 PM »
Shostakovich, 5th quartet, Emerson.



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline anothername

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112890 on: April 16, 2018, 07:03:24 PM »
Ravel
Miroirs
Tharaud





Woah, this is fantastic, love Tharaud's recording, all of them.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112891 on: April 16, 2018, 07:36:58 PM »

Woah, this is fantastic, love Tharaud's recording, all of them.

Yep, Tharaud is one of my favorite Ravelians. Everything in this set is superb. My other favorite Ravel pianist is Anne Queffélec. I liked Perlemuter’s Nimbus recordings, but I just finally got annoyed with the audio quality. It sounded like he was recorded in an underwater cave, which is completely inexcusable, especially when clarity and articulation of the sound are just as important in Ravel as the music itself.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 07:38:31 PM by Mirror Image »
“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112892 on: April 16, 2018, 07:47:05 PM »
Shostakovich, 5th quartet, Emerson.



I think I’ll join you, DD, but only from this set:

“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112893 on: April 16, 2018, 08:37:13 PM »
Morning listening:



I have to look for this one and a double cd with the young Bach. :)

I think they are quite exceptional, as are are the two albums that feature the lute-harpsichord by Robert Hill in the same series.

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112894 on: April 16, 2018, 08:52:21 PM »
Shostakovich
Preludes and Fugues Nos. 1-10
Melnikov




“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112895 on: April 16, 2018, 09:12:43 PM »
Morning listening:



I think they are quite exceptional, as are are the two albums that feature the lute-harpsichord by Robert Hill in the same series.

Q

Thank you ,I have found them and purchased them,thank you. :)

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112896 on: April 17, 2018, 01:50:57 AM »
This whole recording...



This whole Hyperion series of Debussy’s mélodies has been superb. I didn’t post about Volumes 2 or 3 because I couldn’t access GMG at the time I was listening to them. I especially like Malcolm Martineau’s accompaniment throughout the series. Such a sensitive pianist with a genuine feel for the music he performs. What’s interesting is I felt these performances weren’t as good as my alleged ‘favorites’ only to find that my favorites aren’t as inspired as these performances, but I know this is just my mind playing tricks on me (per usual).

I think you missed my question about Volume 1. Because before purchasing, I seem to remember you had concerns about Maltman's voice there.
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112897 on: April 17, 2018, 03:24:02 AM »
Moving right along with the Brahms-Schoenberg quartet in g minor. The next in line is played (wonderfully) by the Chicago Symphony and conducted by the experienced baton of Robert Craft:



My ! What a difference the tempo giusto makes ! Everything falls into place naturally: phrasing, rythms, the right colours all emerge as if from a spring. This is a truly wonderful account. Note the timing: under 38 minutes, vs 45 for the dreadful Järvi account. Labour of love vs forced labour. The Chicago Symphony play as well as, if very differently from, the WP and they outdo the BP at every turn by virtue of their greater cohesiveness as an ensemble. The sound is excellent.

2 more to go: Craft with the Philharmonia and Rozhdestvensky with the London Philharmonic. This proves to be much more fun than I had anticipated !

Thanks, most interesting.
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Offline anothername

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112898 on: April 17, 2018, 03:51:22 AM »

Elena Souliotis.

Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #112899 on: April 17, 2018, 04:36:19 AM »

Elena Souliotis.
Was listening to this same compilation just some days ago...  ;)
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