Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 9416169 times)

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Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124600 on: November 13, 2018, 06:31:33 PM »
Very different beasts compared to Turnage's Piano Concerto! Excellent performances and sound.


Offline Ken B

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124601 on: November 13, 2018, 09:01:36 PM »
Rimsky-Korsakov
Isle of the Dead
San Diego, Talmi

I have not heard this in over 20 years. I used to play it often.  I had forgotten how good it is!

Glazunov
String Quartet 3
Shostakovich Quartet

First listen to this piece
« Last Edit: November 13, 2018, 09:54:07 PM by Ken B »
Give a man a fire and he is warm for a day. Set a man on fire and he is warm for life.

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124602 on: November 13, 2018, 10:28:30 PM »
That prompted me to listen to one of the more unexpected combinations in recorded music, Fiocco and Koopman. Almost as extraordinary as Forqueray and Koopman!



What with you and me  listening to Fiocco, and Harry and Poul listening to Chaumont, we really are going quite far  into French music today.

Your post prompted me take this from the shelves for a morning listening  :)



Q

Offline Christo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124603 on: November 13, 2018, 11:16:25 PM »
Sir Eugene Goossens

Arrived this afternoon and I was wondering if the composer has a distinct voice of his own.I   first listen to it in order to give my comments as honest as any artist deserves to get. :)
The symphony is a totally different matter, coherent and more convincing. It has a Delius like poetry and feels like a wandering in the countryside,gentle and timeless. It is a wonderful  composition as we move to the third part, it remains full of melodious  narrative paintings with cheerful marching rhythms. The last part gives me again the idea that I'm listening to a long symphonic poem. It is perhaps a mix of Debussy and Delius, anyway, I liked it and while I was listening I just found the words that came to my mind, hearing this music for the first time, sure no wasted time .

80 minutes of Goossens the composer under Vernon Handley. As is often the case the works are not presented in the order one would deem optimal. We get the symphony placed first, the concerto second, the short scherzo third and the last item is another concertante piece (written for three other Goossens siblings). The 42 minute symphony is obviously the major offering here, an ambitious piece indeed, whereas the other items offer a lighter side of the composer. Musicweb reviewer Rob Barnett rightly talks of "lower voltage". If the producers are serious about it, they should make sure that a "portrait of " disc presents the works in the order that will yield the most favourable light on the composer.

It would seem Goossens, a renowned conductor, would have absorbed all kinds of influences. Traverso mentioned Delius and Debussy. I didn’t detect any of the latter, but the pastoral elements and flute arabeskes of the Andante espressivo do evoke delian "garden" music. Rob Barnett fires from all cylinders, with mentions of Bax, Bridge, Korngold, Zemlinsky, VW and Scriabine - all composers Goossens is likely to have conducted (he gave the UK premiere of Bax’ second symphony). I don’t know. That’s a bit too much, I think. In any case, it’s a good work from the late "turbulent late thirties [might] be loosely bracketed with the Hubert Clifford symphony, Stanley Bates 3rd and Arthur Benjamin’s symphony " (Barnett again: http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/july99/goossens2.htm.

I’m glad to have reacquainted myself with the Symphony after almost 10 years (for which I have to thank our Vandermolen  ;)). I will play the rest of the disc later this evening.
Great to see both (extant) recordings of this very epic symphony here, especially because I appreciate both of your comments! It was a third (first) recording that won me over, still my favourite, because of its sligthly higher voltage (but only released on vinyl): David Measham conducting the Adelaide SO:
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Irons

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124604 on: November 14, 2018, 12:57:10 AM »
For a recording to stand out from a crowded field of great Schubert piano recordings it has to be special. I was struck by both the delicacy and strength of Gilels playing. I also have the CD which like the LP has very good sound from 1960. I think the coupling on the LP is more appropriate then the CD which has the Liszt B Minor Sonata.

And behind the slime and the croaking there was , sure enough, like an old master beneath a layer of dirt, the noble outline of that divine music. - Hermann Hesse, Steppenwolf.

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124605 on: November 14, 2018, 02:46:32 AM »
Sir Eugene Goossens

  Arrived this afternoon and I was wondering if the composer has a distinct voice of his own.I   first listen to it in order to give my comments as honest as any artist deserves to get. :)
The piano concerto:
My first impression is that I hear all kind of influences wich is not a bad thing if the result is so rewarding as is evidently the case here. The piano concerto  is refined and colourful,it is french oriented but with a pinch of Rachmaninov.
The symphony is a totally different matter, coherent and more convincing.It has a Delius like poetry and feels like a wandering in the countryside,gentle and timeless.It is a wonderful   composition as we move to the third part ,it remains full of melodious  narrative paintings with cheerful marching rhythms.The last part gives me again the idea that I'm listening to a long symphonic poem.
It is perhaps a mix of Debussy and Delius,anyway ,I liked it  and while I was listening I just found the words that came to my mind, hearing this music for the first time,sure no wasted time  .


I'm unable to 'hear' this symphony in your description here;but never mind,we all hear things differently! It reminds me of those programs on the tv,where the presenter would be strolling around in some picturesque location,in Wales,to the strains of gentle,pastoral music. There I'd be hearing the stormy,turbulent bits from Bax symphonies when I looked at the Welsh landscape,through my eyes or,in my head. Usually No's 1 or 2,or even Winter Legends!! (Or even,the noisier bits from Daniel Jones' Fourth,or Brian's Gothic?!!) Christo's use of the word "epic" comes closest to the Goossens symphony I heard. Delius and Debussy,not once! Or,cheerful?! ??? ;D The closest comparison that came to mind were the first two Bax symphonies,but less obviously,'tuneful' (if that's the right word?). More gnarled,though,and turbulent. I could see (hear) some of the continental influences Rob Barnett cites,though! If Frank Bridge was there,it would be the later Bridge of Enter Spring or Phantasm. "Epic",though,just about sums it up.

Incidentally,I'm listening to early acoustic recordings of Chopin,at the moment...........which just sound like,erm,Chopin!! ??? ;D

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124606 on: November 14, 2018, 03:32:28 AM »
Nice to see some discussion of that fine Goossens Symphony 1 here (Symphony 2 is excellent as well). I agree with Christo that the earliest recording by David Measham on a Unicorn LP is the most high-powered version although there is nothing wrong with the ABC or Chandos versions. That David Measham is on my list of LPs which should have been transferred to CD (Bax: Symphony 3, Downes, RCA, Khachaturian Symphony 1, LSO Tjeknavorian, RCA) but never were  >:(
I think that the comparison with Bax, Bridge and Benjamin rings true for me in relation to Goossens First Symphony although I'm sure that Debussy and Delius lurk in the background as well. Yes and also Clifford's inspiriting 'Symphony 1940'.

Thread duty: Finzi: Farewell to Arms (Naxos). I heard this at the Armistice concert last Saturday - there are many echoes of Dies Natalis.

« Last Edit: November 14, 2018, 03:34:29 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124607 on: November 14, 2018, 03:42:50 AM »


Schubert's Rondo in B minor D895, immediately followed by the Brahms/Klengel D major sonata Op.78.

This particular pairing of works throws into relief just how wildly inappropriate this combination of composers is. Schubert comes across as visionary, mystical, half crazed, rule breaking & life affirming; Brahms comes across as elegant, tasteful, insubstantial salon music. And I like the Op.78 sonata very much in whatever form and would ordinarily associate with it some of the characteristics I apply to Schubert but you...basically just can't juxtapose the two like this. The comparison never works in Brahms's favour.

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124608 on: November 14, 2018, 03:52:15 AM »
Rimsky-Korsakov
Isle of the Dead

Are you sure?  :D
I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts. --- Rachmaninoff

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124609 on: November 14, 2018, 04:03:13 AM »
Have you heard Stanford's 2nd Piano Concerto?! Not so much pinch Rachmaninov's 2nd but blatant daylight robbery!

Lock him up!
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124610 on: November 14, 2018, 04:03:58 AM »
Rodrigo
Piano Concerto

Meh.

If I have heard it (and I may have) I have somehow forgotten it.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124611 on: November 14, 2018, 04:04:52 AM »
Landed yesterday, listening to now:

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124612 on: November 14, 2018, 04:07:18 AM »


Piano Quintet & Piano Trio

On second thoughts, I can see where Taneyev's reputation of dryness comes from --- and why it's not entirely groundless. The pervasive atmosphere of his music is one of uncompromising and unrelenting seriousness. Passionate, yes, but with a cold passion. Looks like this man never had even the briefest moments of genuine merriment and joy, never laughtered wholeheartedly, never had the notion of humor and never experienced life otherwise than as a stern and grim business. The most exact description of his music I can think of is "musical Calvinism".  ;D
I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts. --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124613 on: November 14, 2018, 04:09:01 AM »
Landed yesterday, listening to now:



Please comment when you have time and feel like it.
I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts. --- Rachmaninoff

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124614 on: November 14, 2018, 04:09:37 AM »


Piano Quintet & Piano Trio

On second thoughts, I can see where Taneyev's reputation of dryness comes from --- and why it's not entirely groundless. The pervasive atmosphere of his music is one of uncompromising and unrelenting seriousness. Passionate, yes, but with a cold passion. Looks like this man never had even the briefest moments of genuine merriment and joy, never laughtered wholeheartedly, never had the notion of humor and never experienced life otherwise than as a stern and grim business. The most exact description of his music I can think of is "musical Calvinism".  ;D

Why, you speak as if he were Estonian!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124615 on: November 14, 2018, 04:10:30 AM »
Please comment when you have time and feel like it.

Actually, I did begin to listen last night, listened to the second CD twice.  This is exquisite, and I may listen to nothing else all morning.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124616 on: November 14, 2018, 04:20:09 AM »
Why, you speak as if he were Estonian!

Might be the result of his overtly (and overly) intellectual approach to composition. Anyway, by no means is he "the Russian Brahms" --- his coldness is galaxies apart from the melancholy, bittersweet warmth of the latter.
I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts. --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124617 on: November 14, 2018, 04:20:46 AM »
Actually, I did begin to listen last night, listened to the second CD twice.  This is exquisite, and I may listen to nothing else all morning.

Thanks, and I'm glad you like it.
I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts. --- Rachmaninoff

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124618 on: November 14, 2018, 04:45:37 AM »
Actually, I did begin to listen last night, listened to the second CD twice.  This is exquisite, and I may listen to nothing else all morning.
*pounds the table*


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Offline pjme

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #124619 on: November 14, 2018, 04:55:13 AM »
...."melancholy, bittersweet warmth ..."

Sometimes a few words are enough to guide my choice:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/dv4GrZ1T51E" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/dv4GrZ1T51E</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/hvFqNIBFTo4" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/hvFqNIBFTo4</a>

and this...

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/tWO3NQbjcP0" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/tWO3NQbjcP0</a>