Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 8123920 times)

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Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127960 on: January 11, 2019, 09:21:12 PM »
Moszkowski - Piano Concerto (no. 2) in E major



A delightful, tuneful, scintillating work. It has garnered quite a bit of high praise in certain quarters, which is understandable, but it didn't impress me as much as, say, Emil von Sauer's 1st PC (to name another lesser-known PC written around the same time).


Sibelius - String Quartet in D minor Voces intimae



I wasn't too crazy about this work the first couple times I heard it, but by now it's grown on me (though I don't like it as much as most of his orchestral works). The vivacious finale, with its "folk fiddling" influences, is especially enjoyable.


Tournemire - Symphony no. 6



My first encounter with Tournemire's music, and, my, was I impressed! Written during WWI, it's an epic work for tenor soloist, chorus, organ, and orchestra that's quite individual in style, reminding me in places of Lili Boulanger's choral/orchestral works (particularly Psalm 130, which happens to be a text Tournemire also sets in the dramatic central portion of the work). Stirring stuff!


Maconchy - Symphony for Double String Orchestra



A muscular, invigorating work that is a fine addition to the 20th-century string orchestra repertoire. Looking at Wikipedia, I see that Maconchy also has two symphonies for full orchestra that she withdrew - I'd sure like to hear them!


Farrenc - Nonet



I was asked to play this in a couple months, so I gave it a spin. What delightful, fresh, mellifluous music!
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 09:29:52 PM by kyjo »
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127961 on: January 11, 2019, 09:33:22 PM »
Okay, had enough of Mahler bludgeoning me over the head...lol, so now something a bit more appropriate for the late night:

Debussy: Images, Series I & II



Of course, it’s exquisite. Jacobs’ touch is so remarkable.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 09:35:45 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127962 on: January 11, 2019, 09:56:42 PM »
Gotta catch up on posting more recent listening before heading back to school...

Muczynski - Cello Sonata



Another work which I happened upon at a recent local sheet music sale. What a find! I have no hesitation in calling it a masterpiece - it is superbly written, melodically inspired, and emotionally moving. While it occasionally echoes the cello sonatas of Shostakovich and Barber, Muczynski displays his own personal, intensely lyrical voice in this work. BTW, for those unaware, Muczynski (1929-2010) was an American composer best-known for his solo wind music, but who also composed orchestral music (including two symphonies which I'd very much like to hear) and solo piano works. His music has been, for the most part, unaccountably neglected if this sonata is anything to go by.


Rimsky-Korsakov - Piano Concerto



A brief, attractive, folksy, but ultimately rather unmemorable concerto.


Rubbra - Symphony no. 6



This is, quite simply, superb music, eloquent and deeply satisfying. Rubbra at his best.


Bach - Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme, Cantata BWV 140



Continuing my (leisurely) exploration of the Bach cantatas. This one is especially notable for its famous central chorale and its delightful penultimate duet.


Rautavaara - Symphony no. 6 Vincentiana



A strange and colorful work, alternating between bizarre synthesizer solos (supposedly depicting Van Gogh's madness) and lush orchestral tableaux (depicting his paintings). Maybe not a totally convincing work as a whole (I wasn't a fan of the synthesizer bits, though they are rather effectively disturbing!), but there's some good stuff along the way. However, the star of this disc for me is the Cello Concerto (no. 1), a really powerful and accessible work which is all too short at just 17 minutes long (by contrast, the 40-minute symphony could've been trimmed down a bit).
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 09:59:54 PM by kyjo »
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127963 on: January 11, 2019, 11:11:03 PM »
Sibelius, The Rapids-Rider's Brides

That's multiple rapids, one rider, multiple brides...


A dramatic ballad that has a lot in common with the Lemminkainen Suite tone poems of the same era.

Definitely another vocal work where knowing what is being sung about is an asset. Don't take your girlfriend on a boat with you in case a water spirit gets jealous.

EDIT: There appear to be only a small number of recordings. A fairly good database I've found only shows 3 for the original soloist + orchestra version, 2 of them with the same singer. Plus one piano version, and one recording of the choral arrangement. Surely this deserves better.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 11:35:06 PM by Madiel »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127964 on: January 12, 2019, 12:22:48 AM »
I barely made it through Finzi’s Nocturne (New Year Music) without shedding a tear. This is a composer that I have repeatedly broken down with. It’s almost as if we shared a similar soul. The yearning quality of his music resonates deeply with me.
I agree John that there is something very moving about Finzi's 'New Year Music' and much else besides. I got my daughter to get me the new Chandos recording of the Cello Concerto for Christmas and the CD also features the lovely Eclogue and the New Year Music.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 12:26:24 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127965 on: January 12, 2019, 12:24:14 AM »
Moszkowski - Piano Concerto (no. 2) in E major



A delightful, tuneful, scintillating work. It has garnered quite a bit of high praise in certain quarters, which is understandable, but it didn't impress me as much as, say, Emil von Sauer's 1st PC (to name another lesser-known PC written around the same time).


Sibelius - String Quartet in D minor Voces intimae



I wasn't too crazy about this work the first couple times I heard it, but by now it's grown on me (though I don't like it as much as most of his orchestral works). The vivacious finale, with its "folk fiddling" influences, is especially enjoyable.


Tournemire - Symphony no. 6



My first encounter with Tournemire's music, and, my, was I impressed! Written during WWI, it's an epic work for tenor soloist, chorus, organ, and orchestra that's quite individual in style, reminding me in places of Lili Boulanger's choral/orchestral works (particularly Psalm 130, which happens to be a text Tournemire also sets in the dramatic central portion of the work). Stirring stuff!


Maconchy - Symphony for Double String Orchestra



A muscular, invigorating work that is a fine addition to the 20th-century string orchestra repertoire. Looking at Wikipedia, I see that Maconchy also has two symphonies for full orchestra that she withdrew - I'd sure like to hear them!


Farrenc - Nonet



I was asked to play this in a couple months, so I gave it a spin. What delightful, fresh, mellifluous music!

Tournemire is a most interesting composer - Symphony 3 'Moscow' is especially fine.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127966 on: January 12, 2019, 12:29:40 AM »
Quiet City from this set:


I love 'Quiet City' - one of my favourite short works by Copland.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127967 on: January 12, 2019, 01:19:53 AM »
Now streaming Brahms, Nanie (Blomstedt, San Francisco SO)
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Offline Christo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127968 on: January 12, 2019, 01:43:41 AM »
Thread duty, obeing the collective lure of the so-called BSE (Braga Santos experts):
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127969 on: January 12, 2019, 02:16:39 AM »
The new(ish) Arnold Rosner symphony on Toccata:



The musical language in this work is strongly reminiscent of Shostakovich, or another similar composer (maybe Allan Pettersson?) but not without originality or individual interest. Not very easy to digest on a first listen as the music tends to be at a uniform level of intensity and is based on intervals rather than recogniseable themes, so will probably hold up better on a second listen.

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127970 on: January 12, 2019, 02:30:47 AM »
Morning listening - recent arrival:

The Goldbergs performed on viols... on 2 discs...

I guess if you like viols and are a Fretwork fan - like me - it might work...

Q
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 02:56:49 AM by Que »
À chacun son goût.

Offline Draško

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127971 on: January 12, 2019, 02:44:21 AM »

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127972 on: January 12, 2019, 03:05:57 AM »
Morning listening

Despite reading this night after night, it continues to startle me.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline cilgwyn

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127973 on: January 12, 2019, 03:51:24 AM »
I bought a load of cd's of D'indy,a while back. Then got rid of them,after deciding that,his music was quite pleasant,but uneven.......................and,anyway,there just,isn't,much room here!! ::) :(
However,I did rather like Diptyque méditerranéen and Poème des rivages;which were on the Timpani cd,I had. However,Istar was on the same cd,placed between those works,and,while it was quite pleasant (or interesting?) I felt I'd rather just listen to the two other works & focus my mind on those! They are both depictions of sea (Diptyque méditerranéen) & shore (Poème des rivages). I hope I've got that the right way around?!! ::) Someone also (I forget,exactly,where?) described them as a,sort of,French equivalent of Bax or Delius! I hadn't thought of that ??? ;D,to be honest;and as I like Bax and Delius,this comparison appealed to me. So I bought this,s/h,emi cd,which arrived today. I can now focus my attention on sea & shore;and yes,I can hear the Delius,Bax comparison;but with a distinctly Gallic flavour. I think this is beautiful music,actually. It really does evoke vistas of sunny cliffs and beaches and the sea stretching out to the horizon,shimmering in a haze;with a boat bobbing out there,somewhere (or something,like that? I'm not a poet!! :( >:(). Strange how such an 'orrible sounding person can compose such beautiful music? And there is one truly magical moment in the second 'panel' of Diptyque méditerranéen;which really is quite something! The performances sound good to me. The sound quality is up to the usual high standards of emi France;and I think I prefer these performances to those on the Timpani cd. I can also focus,my mind & ears,on sea & shore! Nice! :) (The music I mean;not D'indy! ::)).


Offline Christo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127974 on: January 12, 2019, 03:56:30 AM »
Tournemire - Symphony no. 6



My first encounter with Tournemire's music, and, my, was I impressed! Written during WWI, it's an epic work for tenor soloist, chorus, organ, and orchestra that's quite individual in style, reminding me in places of Lili Boulanger's choral/orchestral works (particularly Psalm 130, which happens to be a text Tournemire also sets in the dramatic central portion of the work).
[/quote]

Had a very similar experience about three years ago, love all of them from No. 3 on, but this one remains my favourite.
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127975 on: January 12, 2019, 04:39:08 AM »
Making a first dent in this set:


Starting off with the First Book of Songs.
Where has this set been all my life?  ???  Pure delight, right from the start. :)
Full notes & texts, thankfully. Simple but stylishly printed paper sleeves.

Perfect.  :D

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline cilgwyn

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127976 on: January 12, 2019, 04:48:00 AM »
Tournemire - Symphony no. 6



My first encounter with Tournemire's music, and, my, was I impressed! Written during WWI, it's an epic work for tenor soloist, chorus, organ, and orchestra that's quite individual in style, reminding me in places of Lili Boulanger's choral/orchestral works (particularly Psalm 130, which happens to be a text Tournemire also sets in the dramatic central portion of the work).


Had a very similar experience about three years ago, love all of them from No. 3 on, but this one remains my favourite. Wonderful! :)
Yes! :) I thought that one was great! Tournemire's music has a distinctive sound. It always makes me think of the remote past. Cathedrals (unsurprisingly) spring to mind! The Sixth has a strange atmosphere,that really draws you into it's world. It's a good performance,too. I'm glad Kyjo liked it,too!

Offline Cato

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127977 on: January 12, 2019, 05:08:07 AM »
Thanks! Great to see you too, Andre. I’ll definitely be sticking around this time as I’m hooked yet again.

Wow, sounds like I need to hear this recording....

[Marches off to Amazon to place yet another quick order.] :)

Just out of rehabilitation, Mirror Image almost immediately and tragically succumbs to GMG BAD* Syndrome!   ;)



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Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127978 on: January 12, 2019, 05:09:09 AM »
Making a first dent in this set:


Starting off with the First Book of Songs.
Where has this set been all my life?  ???  Pure delight, right from the start. :)
Full notes & texts, thankfully. Simple but stylishly printed paper sleeves.

Perfect.  :D

Q

When this set was released many many years ago, I bought it right away, and is still a treasure in my collection.
There comes a point in your life when you realize: Who matters, Who never did, Who won't anymore, And who always will. So, don't worry about people from your past, there's a reason why they didn't make it to your future.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #127979 on: January 12, 2019, 05:22:25 AM »
Weronika Ratusinska
Gasherbrum for Small Symphony Orchestra:
I heard this on the radio the other day and was impressed - approachable, tonal music. The 'Symphony for Great Symphonic Orchestra' (2008) is very impressive, reminding me of the very enjoyable and 'catchy' Symphony by David Bedford. Atmospheric, sometimes dreamy semi-minimalist, effectively orchestrated music which always kept my attention:

« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 05:40:35 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

 

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