Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 6536091 times)

Moonfish and 6 Guests are viewing this topic.

Spineur

  • Guest
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87840 on: March 31, 2017, 06:56:54 AM »



A good morning to you, Karl!   :)

The Weinberg set is smashingly good, I say.   ;)

I saw it somewhere and whislisted.  Can you tell us a bit more about it ?  This is a new release right ?

TD: Another fantastic work of Johannes Brahms: Piano quintet Op 34


Offline Todd

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 15363
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87841 on: March 31, 2017, 07:13:57 AM »



Disc 8.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 44091
  • Samuel Barber (1910 - 1981)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    The sounds from Knoxville during the Summer of 1915
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87842 on: March 31, 2017, 07:48:20 AM »
Listening to Charlie’s Orchestral Set No. 2 from this recording:





About Ives’ Orchestral Set No. 2:

Charles Ives did not intend for his Orchestral Set No. 2 to be a follow-up to the famous first set, Three Places in New England. His notes indicate that by 1911 he'd completed the first two movements, and that the third was written in the fall of 1915. The finished grouping of these three movements wasn't assembled until 1919, whereas Three Places was put together around 1914. Ives' Orchestral Set No. 2 premiered under Morton Gould in Chicago in 1967.

The Orchestral Set No. 2 is scored for a very large orchestra and chorus, rivaling the scale of the Fourth Symphony. The first movement, entitled "An Elegy to Our Forefathers," was originally conceived as an "Overture to Stephen Foster" and undertaken around 1909. It includes quotations from such familiar Foster fare as "Old Black Joe" and "Massa's in de Cold, Cold Ground," but also snatches of African American spirituals such as "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen." Bathed in dark hues of thick, mysterious orchestral color, this movement is the most touching of Ives' forays into African American song. Conductor Leopold Stokowski attempted to point up this element of the work by asking composer Hershy Kay to add a unison chorus to this movement in 1970. While the added choral part doesn't sound out of place in this context, Ives never intended it, and this addition has to be considered spurious.

The second movement, "The Rockstrewn Hills Join in the People's Outdoor Meeting" is based on the Four Ragtime Dances of 1902; some of the same material also appears in the fourth movement of the First Piano Sonata. This piece is a full throttle, no-holds-barred send-up of ragtime rhythm; it contains some of Ives' most trenchantly dissonant writing for the strings and brass in the center section. Bells ring in the climax, consisting of a wonderfully sour rendering of "Bringing in the Sheaves" before the music quiets back down. Despite the outdoor setting indicated by the title, this is urban music -- big and ugly.

The final piece, "From Hanover Square North, at the End of a Tragic Day, the Voice of the People Again Arose" memorializes an event that occurred on a train platform in New York City on Friday, May 7, 1915. Ives records in his Memos how the atmosphere on that day was thick with apprehension at the news that a German Submarine had torpedoed the Lusitania, meaning war was imminent. As Ives waited along with a crowd at the Third Avenue "El," "In the Sweet Bye and Bye" broke out among some of the workers, and soon the whole crowd picked it up. As the train arrived, the magic remained; no one spoke, and some were still singing the tune while boarding. In Ives' score, he utilizes the large orchestral forces at his disposal and unison chorus to perfectly capture the tension and claustrophobia of this scene.

[Article taken from All Music Guide]
"How awful that the artist has become nothing but the after-dinner mint of society.”


Offline HIPster

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2598
  • HIPster
  • Location: Zimmermann's Cafe
  • Currently Listening to:
    Bach and Beyond
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87843 on: March 31, 2017, 07:49:10 AM »
I saw it somewhere and whislisted.  Can you tell us a bit more about it ?  This is a new release right ?


Hi Spineur.

More? :laugh:

Well, I like Kremer and his group quite a lot.  Apparently he (Kremer) has an affinity for Weinberg and has championed his works.  This release is relatively recent (I think at the end of '16).  This set was a gift from a music-loving friend.  ;)

Not being familiar with other works by Weinberg, there's nothing to compare with in that sense.  But Kremer seems to really be committed here - again, as he usually is in my experience.

There's a whole sound-world contained within the ECM aesthetic.  At their best, Mannfred Eicher's releases help to create a continuum of sound and space.  The gap(s) are then easily, or perhaps more readily, bridged between labels: Classical, New, Early, Jazz, World, Folk, Acoustic, Electronic, etc..  Kremer fits nicely within this universe.

The music?  It's among the best of the more recent, contemporary period.  The first CD begins with Weinberg's Chamber Symphony no. 3.  There's a sense of mystery, of a drama unfolding around the listener.  It's a fantastic opening!  There is great beauty throughout this music.  Angst gives way to calm, for reflection perhaps.  Who knows?  Kremer doesn't tell us: we are right there, with him, finding our way through this music.  It's a very worthwhile journey.  :)

Why isn't Weinberg's music programmed more often in concert?  It's a valid question, especially after listening to a release such as this.

Cheers!

Birthday Boy thread duty ~



This is a near-mandatory purchase for Haydn aficionado's and lovers of exquisite lute playing - so, like 98% of us here then.  8)

Fans of sterling sound quality are also invited.  Clear as a bell!

Spineur

  • Guest
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87844 on: March 31, 2017, 08:15:32 AM »
Hi Spineur.

More? :laugh:

.....

Why isn't Weinberg's music programmed more often in concert?  It's a valid question, especially after listening to a release such as this.

Cheers!

Thank you, this was exactly the kind of information I was interested in.  I think I am going to get it, but not before I catch up with my listening of recent acquisitions.

Offline The new erato

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 14240
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87845 on: March 31, 2017, 08:20:05 AM »
An outstanding Pictures IMO:


Offline Toccata&Fugue

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1551
  • Location: Davis, CA
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87846 on: March 31, 2017, 08:42:06 AM »
Something weird is happening to many of the Amazon images in this thread after I increased the privacy setting in Firefox to block all tracking. I now see a generic yellow disc image with the message "Image not available. Click to see at Amazon." Makes me wonder just what was going on with those images before I increased security! Oddly enough, it doesn't happen with the ones that I post.

Anyway, back to what I'm listening to:

"Muß es sein?"
"Es muß sein!"

Spineur

  • Guest
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87847 on: March 31, 2017, 09:23:28 AM »
Schumann string quartets




Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13763
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87848 on: March 31, 2017, 09:26:02 AM »
Mahler: Symphony No. 1 [Kubelik]....





I have always been in a minority among my musical colleagues with never having been over enthused with this set. I came very close to selling it a number of years ago but I held on to it as a result of peer pressure and for fear of their wrath  ;D. As a result I have not listened to it much in recent times. I have now decided to give the cycle another go.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13763
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87849 on: March 31, 2017, 09:29:08 AM »




Vivaldi gives Haydn a run for his money when it comes to unbuttoned, joyous and happy sacred music. The Credo here is sublime.

100% and 100% in that order  8)
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13763
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87850 on: March 31, 2017, 09:31:24 AM »



I have a small number of CDs from that series but not that one. I have always enjoyed them I must say.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline AnthonyAthletic

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1226
  • Currently Listening to:
    Respighi, Mahler, Vaughan Williams, Bruckner & Stravinsky
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87851 on: March 31, 2017, 09:39:54 AM »
Quick question:

I received a batch of older CDs this week, used, mint etc.  What was baffling was the markings on the discs themselves.

Tchaikovsky 4 & 5 symphonies, DG Karajan and an oldish copy of Shostakovich 5 with Ashkenazy on Decca, all had a vivid neon PINK over print on the 'info' side of the cd.

The overprint was, Original CYX DBGM.  With the same pink slashes like on the segments of a clock face around the circumference.

Anyone shed any light on this?  I certainly have never seen this before, discs are original DG/Decca or seem to be.  Anyone know what CYX DBGM means? A supplier, middleman, perhaps?

Cheers.

"Two possibilities exist: Either we are alone in the Universe or we are not. Both are equally terrifying"      (Arthur C. Clarke)

Offline ritter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4620
  • La création du monde (Fernand Léger)
  • Location: "La Villa y Corte"
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87852 on: March 31, 2017, 10:01:21 AM »
First listen to Ernesto Halffter 's Guitar Concerto  from this recent acquisition;


An interesting late work,  in which the composer amalgamates his "stark Spanish neo-classical" style  (clearly indebted to  works by his teacher Falla, such as the Harpsichord Concerto and Master Peter's Puppet Show) with more audacious harmonies.

Very eloquently performed  (as could be exprcted) by Eliot Fisk---even if I have nothing to compare it to--, but thé orchestral contribution has a slight ad hoc feeling to it (with some intrusive noise from the audience and/or the stage ).
Ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
« Là, tout n'est qu'ordre et beauté,
   Luxe, calme et volupté ».

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13763
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87853 on: March 31, 2017, 10:08:17 AM »
Atterberg: Suite No. 7 Op. 29 [Wallin]....





What a wonderful, intriguing sound world. This is wonderful music.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline Bubbles

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 472
  • aka Judge Fish
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87854 on: March 31, 2017, 10:11:21 AM »
Man, I love this kind of music...

Une flute invisible…: Musique francaise a l'aube du XXe siecle



Nothing demanded of the listener, just a non-stop series of aural delights. Some solo piano, some piano with flute, some chansons with Hervé Lamy and/or Sandrine Piau; all mixed together to create a deeply satisfying experience.

Highest rating!
"There is no progress in art, any more than there is progress in making love. There are simply different ways of doing it." – Emmanuel Radnitzky (Man Ray)

Offline SonicMan46

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 11972
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87855 on: March 31, 2017, 10:14:53 AM »
Couple of 'new arrivals':

Faure, Gabriel - Violin Sonatas w/ the gals on the cover art below - just the 2 sonatas, so about 25 minutes left on the CD - my second disc of these works in my collection is Pascal Devoyon & Dong-Suk Kang on Naxos w/ about 12 additional minutes (3 shorter Faure works included) - attached are several reviews of the CD shown for those interested.

Bach-Abel-Binder - Cello & Keyboard Sonatas w/ Brigitte Haudebourg on a fortepiano & Philippe Foulon on a 'violoncello d'amore' - kind of like a baryton - third pic below shows the bridges w/ regular and sympathetic strings; booklet notes discuss mainly the instruments in depth - recommended by several members in this thread (believe one was André) - composers all from the 18th century - a delightful recording.  Dave :)

   

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 47659
  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
    • Henningmusick
  • Location: Boston, Mass.
  • Currently Listening to:
    Shostakovich, Frescobaldi, Stravinsky, JS Bach, Liszt, Chopin, Haydn, Henning
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87856 on: March 31, 2017, 10:46:57 AM »
Haydn Symphony No.6 D major "Le Matin", Fey conducting the Heidelberger Sinfoniker



Sarge

I'm in:

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!!!

“Papa”
Symphony № 6 in D, « Le matin » Hob.I/6
AAM
Hogwood


Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Que

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 14868
  • "One HIP dude"
  • Location: The Hague, Netherlands
  • Currently Listening to:
    Still nuts about harpsichord music and exploring Early Music.
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87857 on: March 31, 2017, 10:51:56 AM »
.



How is that?  Should rank high on the priority list?  :)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Maestro267

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1161
  • Location: Wales
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87858 on: March 31, 2017, 10:54:12 AM »
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 15 in A major
Royal Liverpool PO/Petrenko

I feel like this symphony, especially the 2nd movement, should be listened to with the lights off. The sparse emptiness calls for it.

Offline aligreto

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 13763
  • Location: Ireland
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #87859 on: March 31, 2017, 11:07:43 AM »
Wiren: Symphony No. 2 [Dausgaard]....





A first listen to this work for me. I found it to be lively, energetic and very interesting yet with some, not quite dark but perhaps poignant overtones in there.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.