Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 5286531 times)

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Online kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98620 on: September 13, 2017, 09:51:16 PM »
As per John's recommendation, just finished listening to Lou Harrison's Symphony no. 2 Elegiac:



A meditative and often strikingly beautiful piece. However, the frequent use of a tinny-sounding "tack piano" was a bit of a turn-off for me. I'll definitely be exploring more of Harrison's music in the future.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2017, 09:54:12 PM by kyjo »

Online Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98621 on: September 13, 2017, 10:10:48 PM »
For those interested: this is what you can do when the ASIN link doesn't produce a picture (after you have checked that the code properly links to the physical CD, not the download version) and you want to avoid posting a blank picture:

You make a linked picture, consisting of the location of the image that is linked to the web page:

[ url=http://... ][ img width=380]location.jpg[/img][/url] (I have inserted a space after the 1st brackets for visibility)



An unlinked picture is naturally also a possibility....  ;)

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98622 on: September 13, 2017, 10:18:52 PM »
Stravinsky, Petrushka, Ansermet, OSR



Splendid!

Offline opaquer

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98623 on: September 14, 2017, 12:15:57 AM »
Stravinsky, Petrushka, Ansermet, OSR



Splendid!

Hell yes!

Offline opaquer

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98624 on: September 14, 2017, 12:16:50 AM »
Gershwin - Rhapsody In Blue

Has a soft spot in my heart and it's giving me the giggles right now for some reason  :laugh:


Online Mandryka

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98625 on: September 14, 2017, 01:53:13 AM »


More armchair camino with Ensemble Venance Fortunat's second volume of music from the Codex Calixtinus.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Autumn Leaves

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98626 on: September 14, 2017, 02:10:14 AM »
Recent listening:



Bruckner: Symphony #0 In D Minor, WAB 100, "Die Nullte" - Tintner/NSO Of Ireland

Quite good - Tintner and my fellow Irishmen don't manage to make a balls of this performance anyway.
The Symphony #0 lacks the grandeur of the later Symphonies I guess but I still think it's very nice.



Vaughan Williams: Symphony #2 In G, "A London Symphony" - Haitink/LPO

Not listened to this work in a while - It's one of his better Symphonies I think.
Haitink's Cycle of RVW was the first one I owned; then I culled it; then I bought it back again - Now I think it's the best RVW Cycle :).




Offline Harry's corner

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98627 on: September 14, 2017, 02:31:44 AM »
You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.

Offline Maestro267

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98628 on: September 14, 2017, 02:50:27 AM »
Penderecki: Violin Concerto No. 1
Kulka (violin)/Polish NRSO/Wit

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98629 on: September 14, 2017, 03:00:58 AM »


Vaughan Williams: Symphony #2 In G, "A London Symphony" - Haitink/LPO

Not listened to this work in a while - It's one of his better Symphonies I think.
Haitink's Cycle of RVW was the first one I owned; then I culled it; then I bought it back again - Now I think it's the best RVW Cycle :).

Great story!  And a fine example of how our ears change over time.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Harry's corner

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98630 on: September 14, 2017, 04:29:19 AM »
Third listen of this disc. Fabulous!

You can safely assume you've created God in your own image when it turns out that God hates all the same people you do.

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98631 on: September 14, 2017, 05:06:13 AM »





If you have two versions of the From the Monkey Mountains quartet, you might as well A/B 'em. 

I started with the Pavel Haas Quartet since they are named after the composer.  With both ensembles, expert playing is given, and here the Pavel Haas offer mostly full bodied and at times warm playing.  One can hear the influence of Janacek on the younger composer, but the work is not merely imitative.  One can hear other influences, and some folksy music, and also some rhythmic exploration that, while not as individual as Janacek, still pushes the boundaries of its time a bit, if not in a truly radical way.  The first movement, Landscape, is relatively lush, while the second - Coach, Coachman and Horse - is more adventurous, with the dialogue between the low strings and the violins creating both novel and of-the-20s, avant-garde sonorities and a potent "rustic" atmosphere.  It's more vibrant and snappy than many other Andantes.  Good stuff.  The third movement, The Moon and I (a Largo e misterioso), is more subdued and mysterious to start with, slowly building in intensity and power, almost like a scaled-back and more austere Transfigured Night.  Then comes the closer, Wild Night, which out of the gate relies on higher register playing, possesses mucho energy, and has folksy dance elements, in an almost Mephistophelian way, which is augmented by some percussion, superbly played by Colin Currie. 

The Petersen, in its Conrad Muck led guise, are a different kettle of fish.  Their corporate sonority is leaner, edgier, and brighter, their attack more aggressive, their style more unabashedly modern.  This is immediately apparent in the opening movement, which here sounds more avant-garde and less folksy, more Schoenberg than Janacek.  One can hear almost proto-minimalist writing in the violins, and some passages are chirped out aggressively as almost a minute is shed off the timing.  The second movement sounds almost Expressionist in its tuneful ugliness.  Muck slices through the muck, as it were, in a few passages, successfully entreating his fellow musicians to grind out a little more.  The Largo e misterioso is tense even when subdued, and the players just keeps ratcheting up tension until the climax, before backing off in a haunting, nearly Bergian way.  The Finale sounds almost like something out of a horror movie soundtrack at the start, and proceeds at a more robust pace, with sharper playing from the quartet and punchier playing from percussionist Daniel Tummes.  The middle section is folksy, with Muck fiddling out some of his music with an intellectualized version of rustic fiddling.  The recording is more in your face musically than the Pavel Haas Quartet, always pushing and pushing and pushing.

Here's a case that illustrates why both ensembles are among my favorites: they both execute their very different visions so well that it becomes essential to have both.  No culling needed here.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2017, 05:25:07 AM by Todd »
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98632 on: September 14, 2017, 05:12:32 AM »
What of the Back to the Monkey Mountains Quartet, eh?
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Online ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98633 on: September 14, 2017, 05:17:10 AM »
Two late works by George Enescu:

The Concert Overture, op 32...



...and a long-time favourite, the Chamber Symphony, op 33



Both works are fantastic, and reflect the composer's ability at this stage of his career to sublimate the folk idioms that permeate much of his work into something particularly refined. The Chamber Symphony is an elusive work of subdued beauty, and IMHO among the crowning achievements of Enescu's output.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2017, 05:21:20 AM by ritter »
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Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98634 on: September 14, 2017, 06:01:00 AM »
Hey it's three of my favourite pieces (and some Smetana) in truly excellent performances. The sound is pretty historical, but whatevs.


Offline Maestro267

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98635 on: September 14, 2017, 06:38:26 AM »
Maw: Odyssey
City of Birmingham SO/Rattle

Big fan of this work, especially the long Part III.

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98636 on: September 14, 2017, 07:30:34 AM »
When I hear bad Beethoven playing, I have to rinse it out with good Beethoven playing.


Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98637 on: September 14, 2017, 07:40:03 AM »
I've really been enjoying the Krenek piano concertos on Toccata.



Thanks ! Per your recommendation,  they will be on my Krenek wish list  :).

Offline Brewski

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98638 on: September 14, 2017, 07:40:20 AM »





If you have two versions of the From the Monkey Mountains quartet, you might as well A/B 'em. 

I started with the Pavel Haas Quartet since they are named after the composer.  With both ensembles, expert playing is given, and here the Pavel Haas offer mostly full bodied and at times warm playing.  One can hear the influence of Janacek on the younger composer, but the work is not merely imitative.  One can hear other influences, and some folksy music, and also some rhythmic exploration that, while not as individual as Janacek, still pushes the boundaries of its time a bit, if not in a truly radical way.  The first movement, Landscape, is relatively lush, while the second - Coach, Coachman and Horse - is more adventurous, with the dialogue between the low strings and the violins creating both novel and of-the-20s, avant-garde sonorities and a potent "rustic" atmosphere.  It's more vibrant and snappy than many other Andantes.  Good stuff.  The third movement, The Moon and I (a Largo e misterioso), is more subdued and mysterious to start with, slowly building in intensity and power, almost like a scaled-back and more austere Transfigured Night.  Then comes the closer, Wild Night, which out of the gate relies on higher register playing, possesses mucho energy, and has folksy dance elements, in an almost Mephistophelian way, which is augmented by some percussion, superbly played by Colin Currie. 

The Petersen, in its Conrad Muck led guise, are a different kettle of fish.  Their corporate sonority is leaner, edgier, and brighter, their attack more aggressive, their style more unabashedly modern.  This is immediately apparent in the opening movement, which here sounds more avant-garde and less folksy, more Schoenberg than Janacek.  One can hear almost proto-minimalist writing in the violins, and some passages are chirped out aggressively as almost a minute is shed off the timing.  The second movement sounds almost Expressionist in its tuneful ugliness.  Muck slices through the muck, as it were, in a few passages, successfully entreating his fellow musicians to grind out a little more.  The Largo e misterioso is tense even when subdued, and the players just keeps ratcheting up tension until the climax, before backing off in a haunting, nearly Bergian way.  The Finale sounds almost like something out of a horror movie soundtrack at the start, and proceeds at a more robust pace, with sharper playing from the quartet and punchier playing from percussionist Daniel Tummes.  The middle section is folksy, with Muck fiddling out some of his music with an intellectualized version of rustic fiddling.  The recording is more in your face musically than the Pavel Haas Quartet, always pushing and pushing and pushing.

Here's a case that illustrates why both ensembles are among my favorites: they both execute their very different visions so well that it becomes essential to have both.  No culling needed here.

Thanks for this comparison. I only discovered that Haas piece a couple of years ago, thanks to a concert by the Apple Hill String Quartet -- loved it. In this case, they did not opt for the percussion part, which I'd really like to hear, and I'm a big fan of Colin Currie, so the first one above is appealing.

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Online Mandryka

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #98639 on: September 14, 2017, 08:03:44 AM »


Collegium Aureum Quartet op 132, in the first movement the emotional world is so dark it's almost expressionist.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

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