Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 6895448 times)

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102720 on: November 22, 2017, 10:19:47 PM »
The 8th:

“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102721 on: November 22, 2017, 10:25:52 PM »
Casella's Symphony no. 2:



Head-banging stuff! This piece is the polar opposite of what comes to most people's minds when they think of Italian music - it's big, dark, loud, and Mahlerian. Derivative, maybe, but powerful and highly enjoyable nonetheless. The second movement was actually my favorite of the four - a whirling, stomping scherzo that is suffused with supercharged Russian energy. Casella would later go on to develop a more personal style, as exemplified by his wonderful Third Symphony.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 10:29:36 PM by kyjo »
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102722 on: November 22, 2017, 10:30:18 PM »
Casella's Symphony no. 2:



Head-banging stuff! This piece is the polar opposite of what comes to most people's minds when they think of Italian music - it's big, dark, loud, and Mahlerian. Derivative, maybe, but powerful and highly enjoyable nonetheless. The second movement was actually my favorite of the four - a whirling, stomping scherzo that is suffused with supercharged Russian energy.

A pretty nice symphony, but not a favorite of mine from Casella. The Sinfonia (Symphony No. 3), his last symphony, is my favorite with an absolute heart-rendering slow movement, Andante molto moderato quasi adagio. This particular movement, for me, is one of the best things he has composed. The Alun Francis recording is the one to own. Noseda totally misses the point in this slow movement and rushes through some key moments that should have been treated more delicately.
“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102723 on: November 22, 2017, 10:37:21 PM »
Morning listening - after the Cantiones Sacrae switching back to the Psalms set:


Fourth Book of Psalms (1621)

Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102724 on: November 23, 2017, 01:00:06 AM »


Last two CDs of this set.
Florestan's high regard for this set is justified.

I'm glad you enjoy it.

Quote
Although it's probably better to dip into the set a bit at a time, not wholesale like I am doing now.

It took me one year to get to volume 13.  :)

On a more general note, as of late I noticed that even listening to a single cd with multiple works in one go is too much. Say, the three Brahms violin sonatas: hearing them all in a row makes a mess of them as one can't properly focus but on the currently playing one; as long as one finishes and other begins, the former is forgotten instantly. And the worst is mixing up different composers and different styles, resulting in a complete chaos. I resolved to listen to only one work at the time and take a large enough break bewteen listenings as to be able to digest what I've just listened to. Less is more. :)
Music, even in situations of the greatest horror, should never be painful to the ear but should flatter and charm it, and thereby always remain music.. - Mozart

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102725 on: November 23, 2017, 01:14:13 AM »


A long time ago I heard one of Annie Gosfield's pieces at a concert and my only conclusion was that it was too loud. Since I'm now older (if not wiser) I am listening to this and liking it so far. (Maybe belongs in the jazz thread though.)
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 01:16:16 AM by amw »

Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102726 on: November 23, 2017, 01:18:04 AM »
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
Aristotle.

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Offline Turner

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102727 on: November 23, 2017, 01:31:42 AM »
Various stuff from this set.

A lot of interesting and well-played items (and apparently a few real blunders too of horrible sound, haven´t gotten to those yet). Includes Castiglioni, if one wants something more modern.
Overall, quite exciting.

https://www.jpc.de/jpcng/classic/detail/-/art/20th-century-italian-pian/hnum/4297291
http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2017/Feb/20C_Italian_piano_9470.htm
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 02:15:40 AM by Turner »

Offline eljr

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102728 on: November 23, 2017, 02:48:04 AM »


Choir of the Vienna Hofburgkapelle
Gregorian Chant for the Church Year

CD 2
Christmas

Genre
Classical
Audio CD (31 Jan. 2011)
Number of Discs: 6
Format: Box set
“You practice and you get better. It’s very simple.”
Philip Glass

Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102729 on: November 23, 2017, 02:58:45 AM »
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
Aristotle.

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102730 on: November 23, 2017, 03:10:47 AM »
Takemitsu - November Steps

Probably his work that I have the most history with, I used to listen to this one a lot. Amazing blend of colors  :-*



Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102731 on: November 23, 2017, 03:11:13 AM »


Disc 4/4.

This set has music from 10 movies, all performed superbly by Frank Strobel and the RSO, Berlin. Schnittke is more successful than Shostakovich in creating genuinely original, intriguing, captivating numbers. Although I love Dsch’s film music, and own half a dozen discs of it, I find Schnittke’ genius more at home in the particular language of film music.

This is interesting to know (and I saw Mirror Image's comments as well). I don't know any Schnittke but he's on the (always quite long) "to do" list. So I'll try to remember to include film music in what I explore.
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Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102732 on: November 23, 2017, 03:23:04 AM »


double-checking by listening to this again (ok tbf, I also just couldn't resist when someone brought it up) and yep: still one of the best versions available.

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102733 on: November 23, 2017, 03:36:22 AM »
Now streaming various things...

It started with Mendelssohn opuses. Op.21 is the Overture for A Midsummer Night's Dream, which was very enjoyable (I think I've heard it before). Then there was op.22, the Capriccio Brilliant for piano and orchestra.

Then I went on to op.23, which is 3 sacred choral works, but decided to dovetail with 2 of my other listening exercises which were also up to choral works.

So shortly I will hear Prokofiev's Toast to Stalin (Zdravitsa, op.85, which I'm sure will be a bit of a contrast to the "war sonatas" for piano.

Then it'll be the last Rachmaninov opus that I've never heard before, the 3 Russian Songs for choir, op.41.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102734 on: November 23, 2017, 04:04:09 AM »



l'An mil was composed in 1897. It is a big work (ca 35 mins.), a symphonic poem with large chorus and (a brief) baritone solo in part 2.

Very detailed program:

Miserere mei - the people's fear for the year 1000. Will Satan appear?
Fête des fous et de l'âne - a parody / blasphemy of a religious service. "...those who took the threats of the Apocalyps as purely symbolic, celebrated the Feast of fools and the ass..."
Te Deum laudamus...:the reassured crowds kneel in prayer. The Te Deum bursts forth in the surprise of the unhoped  -for dawn.

Very nice - the first and last movements are very lyrical, Franckiste, aiming for the grandiose. The second movement is mostly fast, almost good humoured - made me even think of Honegger's Jeanne d'Arc ( the proces scene).
This could appeal, I guess, to those who love Franck, ofcourse, Gounod, Massenet,or even Debussy's Sébastien . Elgar?


Very rare, unusual & interesting:

http://www.atelierlyriquedetourcoing.fr/17_18/spect1718/paradisperdu.html


24/11 and 26/11/17

Atelier Lyrique de Tourcoing: a recreation of Théodore Dubois' (1837-1924) oratorio "Paradis perdu", after Milton.
Dans l’instrumentation originale d’après le manuscrit autographe de Théodore Dubois
Drame-oratorio en quatre parties créé en 1878
Livret d’Edouard Blau d’après le poème de John Milton

Direction musicale, Jean Claude Malgoire
Conception visuelle et scénographie, Jacky Lautem

Ève - Magali Simard-Galdès, soprano
Adam - Antonio Figueroa, ténor
Satan - Marc Boucher, baryton
L’Archange - Mireille Lebel, mezzo-soprano
Uriel, le fils - Denis Mignien, ténor
Molock - Philippe Favette
Belial - Kamil Ben Hsain Lachiri

Choeur de chambre de Namur
Préparation du choeur, Thibaut Lienaerts

La Grande Écurie et la Chambre du Roy
« Last Edit: November 23, 2017, 06:19:11 AM by pjme »

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102735 on: November 23, 2017, 04:20:15 AM »
Streaming Nielsen Violin Concerto. I plan on buying this version eventually on the grounds of the Sibelius, so I might as well use it for my current Nielsen exploration.

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Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102736 on: November 23, 2017, 06:23:17 AM »



Michel Dalberto's Benediction.  Almost as long as Barrio's, Dalberto starts off very slowly, with each of the first few notes given their space.  He lets the music unfold very deliberately, and he keeps the low end dynamics nicely varied.  He extracts a lovely sound when playing quietly, and when paired with liberal sustain pedal use, the rolled chords sound blurred.  Like Korstick, when he plays more loudly, the playing gets harder, with copious steel display in the climax.  The Andante does not come off as well, given a lack of flow and relative lack of beauty.  The Piu sostenuto, emerging expertly from the last note of the Andante, flows nicely, though the rolled chords here sometimes have a metallic tinge, and Dalberto's steely tone emerges early in the build up to the climax, which takes on a very Liebestod-y vibe.  The right hand runs afterward are splendidly done, and then he backs way off for the remaining music, returning in mood and feel to the opening, with a very spacious presentation, and a solemn coda.  As is so often the case with Dalberto's recordings, his renditions are not the best interpretations, but his playing is powerful and imposing and simply cannot be ignored. 
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102737 on: November 23, 2017, 06:24:11 AM »
I had my fill of the interpretations of Kay Johansson and Andrea Macon in the complete organ works by Bach on the Hanssler edition.
After been halfway through the fourth disc I decided that enough is enough.

http://walboi.blogspot.nl/2017/11/bach-johann-sebastian-1685-1750_20.html?spref=tw

Interesting because my reaction to Marcon's Bach is quite similar to yours. Johanssen however I find more rewarding, even if his style is somewhat restrained. Try the triosonatas and the CD: Der junge Bach played on the Schnitger organ in Cappel.
Tiden læger alle sår,
heldigt nok at tiden går.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102738 on: November 23, 2017, 06:41:30 AM »
Apollon musagète:

“I really would like to go to Marmorkirken. It was there that I heard music for the first time, and that experience is like a heavenly vision for me.” - Rued Langgaard

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102739 on: November 23, 2017, 06:52:34 AM »
Roberta Mameli (Soprano), Luca Pianca (Lute)
Music of Claudio Monteverdi,  Giulio Caccini,  Barbara Strozzi,  Sigismondo D'India, Andrea Falconieri, Pietro P. Raimondo, Tarquinio Merula