Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 7390406 times)

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Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116680 on: June 13, 2018, 09:53:42 AM »


This Brahms German Requiem is quite special. The choir is that of the Windbacher Knabenchor. Men tenors and basses, boy sopranos and altos. The sound they produce is gorgeous in its transparency. The ability of the boys to ascend to top As and Bs while keeping intact that purity is amazing. The Allegri Miserere comes to mind. It’s akin to sudden flashes of light in a vast space. The DSO Berlin is a well-known outfit, formerly called the RIAS Orchestra, Berlin (under Fricsay and Maazel), then RSO Berlin under Chailly and Nagano.

Conductor Beringer conducts with a sure hand, keeping things moving along smartly (68 minutes, vs the usual 72-77 minutes from other hands - Tennstedt takes it past the 80 minute mark). Some portions are extremely dramatic - not your usual avuncular Brahms Requiem ! The orchestra plays here with very little vibrato, allowing horns and timpani to register tellingly. A HIP Brahms Requiem ? The results are so convincing musically that I am totally won over by that conception. I bought that for a song at JPC a few months ago. It’s more expensive now.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 10:24:04 AM by André »

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116681 on: June 13, 2018, 10:21:06 AM »
This week I’ve been busy comparing versions of Edgar Varèse’s Amériques. I listened to Boulez with the NYPO and the Chicago Symphony, Nagano in Paris, Dohnanyi in Cleveland, and from Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, Jansons and Chailly. Additional hearings are in order because this is a uniquely compelling and complex work, and no version is really comparable to the other - they each have a unique POV. Chailly conducts the reconstructed original version that calls for 155 players, while everyone else conducts the score Varèse revised at Stokowski’s request (about 115 players only). Will chime in when I’m done.

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116682 on: June 13, 2018, 10:39:21 AM »
Today



Superb on all accounts.
"Music expresses that which cannot be said and upon which it is impossible to remain silent." - Victor Hugo

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116683 on: June 13, 2018, 11:00:57 AM »
This week I’ve been busy comparing versions of Edgar Varèse’s Amériques. I listened to Boulez with the NYPO and the Chicago Symphony, Nagano in Paris, Dohnanyi in Cleveland, and from Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, Jansons and Chailly. Additional hearings are in order because this is a uniquely compelling and complex work, and no version is really comparable to the other - they each have a unique POV. Chailly conducts the reconstructed original version that calls for 155 players, while everyone else conducts the score Varèse revised at Stokowski’s request (about 115 players only). Will chime in when I’m done.

Was listening to 'Arcana' yesterday which I liked. It features in a boxed set devoted to the conductor Jean Martinon:


Arcana features in the disc on the top. I like the way that they have reproduced mini versions of the original LP sleeve.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 11:04:25 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116684 on: June 13, 2018, 11:19:09 AM »
Was listening to 'Arcana' yesterday which I liked. It features in a boxed set devoted to the conductor Jean Martinon:


Arcana features in the disc on the top. I like the way that they have reproduced mini versions of the original LP sleeve.

Love that box. Too bad there are not more Martinon recordings in Chicago. His later period was not as successful, having to deal with less stellar orchestras.

Offline SurprisedByBeauty

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116685 on: June 13, 2018, 11:21:28 AM »


Very good Byrd playing from Egarr, incandescent, full of passion, this is a fabulous recording.

Unmistakably Byrd, that's for sure!

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116686 on: June 13, 2018, 11:36:10 AM »


I have very little Menotti and Dello Joio, and zero Lo Presti. The Apocalypse by Menotti is a beautiful, powerful and moving work. 3 movements, 21 minutes in length. It is based on the apocalyptic genre in general - including, but not limited to - that of John from the New Testament. Lo Presti’s work is rather short, a 2 movement piece beginning pensively and ending in celebration. Nice, but somewhat lacking in substance. Dello Joio’s work is in the form of a Prologue, Theme and 10 variations and is scored for strings alone. It won its author the Pulitzer prize in 1957. It’s both substantial and very satisfying. De Preist is his usually excellent self. I have another disc conducted by De Priest in similar repertoire. His Shostakovich recordings are notable, too. Excellent sound.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116687 on: June 13, 2018, 11:44:02 AM »


I have very little Menotti and Dello Joio, and zero Lo Presti. The Apocalypse by Menotti is a beautiful, powerful and moving work. 3 movements, 21 minutes in length. It is based on the apocalyptic genre in general - including, but not limited to - that of John from the New Testament. Lo Presti’s work is rather short, a 2 movement piece beginning pensively and ending in celebration. Nice, but somewhat lacking in substance. Dello Joio’s work is in the form of a Prologue, Theme and 10 variations and is scored for strings alone. It won its author the Pulitzer prize in 1957. It’s both substantial and very satisfying. De Preist is his usually excellent self. I have another disc conducted by De Priest in similar repertoire. His Shostakovich recordings are notable, too. Excellent sound.

That is one of my favourite and most often played CDs. I love all three works but, guess what, my favourite is Lo Presti's 'The Masks' which doesn't even get a mention on the cover of the CD! Especially the first of the two movements which, for some reason, I find incredibly moving. The Menotti and Dello Joio are great too and I often play the disc right through from beginning to end. I agree about De Preist who was a fine conductor.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2018, 11:46:05 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116688 on: June 13, 2018, 11:50:16 AM »
Madetoja: Symphony No. 2 [Sakari]





I really like the sound world of this work. It is beguiling, atmospheric and captivating. The orchestration, on the surface, seems straightforward for the most part but its apparent simplicity belies its effectiveness. The end result of the music and its treatment is absorbing, compelling and engaging. The drama infused in the third movement adds exuberance and great contrast in the work as a whole.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116689 on: June 13, 2018, 11:54:01 AM »



What are your initial thoughts on this box?

I have only listened to the first two of five CDs which comprise the French Suites 1-6. The playing has great fluidity and vitality which instills vigour into these performances. I also like the sound of the instrument which is very full and is very well recorded. I really like it so far.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116690 on: June 13, 2018, 01:14:44 PM »
Madetoja: Symphony No. 2 [Sakari]





I really like the sound world of this work. It is beguiling, atmospheric and captivating. The orchestration, on the surface, seems straightforward for the most part but its apparent simplicity belies its effectiveness. The end result of the music and its treatment is absorbing, compelling and engaging. The drama infused in the third movement adds exuberance and great contrast in the work as a whole.
+ 1 dedicated, I think, in memory of his brother killed in the Finnish Civil War. No 2 is the greatest I think and that is a fine set.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116691 on: June 13, 2018, 01:15:44 PM »
Love that box. Too bad there are not more Martinon recordings in Chicago. His later period was not as successful, having to deal with less stellar orchestras.

I liked his Prokofiev symphony recordings with the ORTF.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline listener

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116692 on: June 13, 2018, 01:52:37 PM »
American music for string orchestra
BARBER: Serenade op. 1   Irving FINE: Serious Song - A Lament for String Orch
estra
CARTER: Elegy    DIAMOND: Rounds for String OrchestraLos Angeles Chamber Orch. 
a short disc, copy of an LP issue. recorded in 1980.   Cheery ending with the Diamond set
and some organ music by SPETH, MUFFAT, NAUSS, MAICHELBECK, MARPURG, P.E. BACH, OLEY and KNECHT

played on the Gabler organ at Weingarten by Heinrich Hamm
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Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116693 on: June 13, 2018, 02:23:14 PM »


Contrary to his colleagues Paray, Munch, Monteux or Cluytens, Ansermet never « interprets » a score. He may be on the dry, objective side, but he’s never dull or dour. So it is with these Franck works (a Berlioz overture not mentioned on the front cover is added for good measure). Ansermet trusts the composer and delivers the goods in a neat, lively fashion. Coupled with characterful playing and superb engineering, the results are all I can ask.

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116694 on: June 13, 2018, 02:43:25 PM »
Have you heard his Op.106? The Adagio is nearly 29 minutes! (and is a single take...) Conversely, he comes close to Beethoven's MM in the outer movements.
Yep. It's.... not great. The outer movements are good in terms of tempo, which not many people are, but miss a lot of the other nuances. The scherzo is good, though.

ComposerOfAvantGarde

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116695 on: June 13, 2018, 04:17:24 PM »
This week I’ve been busy comparing versions of Edgar Varèse’s Amériques. I listened to Boulez with the NYPO and the Chicago Symphony, Nagano in Paris, Dohnanyi in Cleveland, and from Amsterdam’s Concertgebouw, Jansons and Chailly. Additional hearings are in order because this is a uniquely compelling and complex work, and no version is really comparable to the other - they each have a unique POV. Chailly conducts the reconstructed original version that calls for 155 players, while everyone else conducts the score Varèse revised at Stokowski’s request (about 115 players only). Will chime in when I’m done.

Looking forward to reading your review!
« Last Edit: June 14, 2018, 05:29:01 AM by jessop »

Offline RebLem

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116696 on: June 13, 2018, 07:13:51 PM »
On Wednesday, 13 JUNE 2018, I listened to one CD.

CD 6 of 7 in an RCA set titled "Van Cliburn plays Great Piano Concertos."  |Tr. 1-3.  L.V. Beethoven (1770-1827):  Piano Concerto 4 in G Major, Op. 58 (33'49)--Fritz Reiner, cond., Chicago  Symphony Orch., rec. 1963.  |Tr. 4-6.  Franz Liszt (1811-86): Piano Concerto 1 in E Flat Major, S 124. (18'21)  |Tr. 7-32.  S. Rachmaninoff (1873-1943):  Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini, Op. 43. (24'42)--Eugene Ormandy, cond., Philadelphia Orch. (Tr. 4-32), rec. 1968 (4-6), 1970 (7-32).  TT: 76'52).

My two favorite sets of the Beethoven Piano Concerti are the Goode/Fischer set and, or course, the old reliable Fleisher/Szell.  Cliburn never recorded the first two concerti, but this recording is a worthy effort.  Not up to the standard of the best, but very good nevertheless, especially in the middle slow movement, where he lovingly caresses every phrase.

The great French pianist Samson Francois recorded the Liszt 1 three times; the best, in my opinion, is his first, from 1954, with Constantin Silvestri and the Philharmonia Orch.  That is my favorite recording of this work, by far.

Cliburn's Rhapsody is OK, but my favorite is still the Graffman/Bernstein.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116697 on: June 13, 2018, 08:47:10 PM »


Contrary to his colleagues Paray, Munch, Monteux or Cluytens, Ansermet never « interprets » a score. He may be on the dry, objective side, but he’s never dull or dour. So it is with these Franck works (a Berlioz overture not mentioned on the front cover is added for good measure). Ansermet trusts the composer and delivers the goods in a neat, lively fashion. Coupled with characterful playing and superb engineering, the results are all I can ask.

Always liked Ansermet - had his Debussy box on LP and greatly admire his Glazunov 'The Seasons' and Honegger symphonies, especially No.4 which is my favourite version.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116698 on: June 13, 2018, 11:16:33 PM »
Vincent Lubeck, Complete Harpsichord and Organ music.

CD 1.

Manuel Tomadin plays on the Van Hagerbeer/Schnitger organ, in the Grote St. Laurenskerk, Alkmaar, The Netherlands.

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Aristotle.


When we meet real tragedy in life, we can react in two ways - either by losing hope and falling into self-destructive habits, or by using the challenge to find our inner strength.

Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #116699 on: June 14, 2018, 12:55:55 AM »
German Lute music of the 18th century, CD 1) Bayreuth: a centre of German Lute music.
Composers are: Paul-Charles Durant, Jacob Friedrich Kleinknecht, Silvius Leopold Weiss, Adam Falckenhagen.


Played by: Alberto Crugnola on a Baroque lute after Martin Hoffman Lipsia 169*, Giuseppe Tumiati 1997, Milano, Italy.

Hat tip to Que. It is a truly remarkable recording in every respect.
It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
Aristotle.


When we meet real tragedy in life, we can react in two ways - either by losing hope and falling into self-destructive habits, or by using the challenge to find our inner strength.