Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 7579333 times)

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123120 on: October 18, 2018, 10:56:53 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Sm5rri1zkvU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Sm5rri1zkvU</a>
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Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123121 on: October 18, 2018, 11:01:13 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Sm5rri1zkvU" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Sm5rri1zkvU</a>
I was listening to Milhaud’s  Six Chamber Symphonies just the other day (after listening to the “big” symphonies 7 through 9) and really enjoyed them... :)
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123122 on: October 18, 2018, 11:02:24 AM »
I was listening to Milhaud’s  Six Chamber Symphonies just the other day (after listening to the “big” symphonies 7 through 9) and really enjoyed them... :)

I love 'em!  All of the "big" 'uns left me entirely tepid.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123123 on: October 18, 2018, 11:05:47 AM »
Well, but Metamorphosen is top-shelf R. Strauss!

I'd bet the string sextet is worth the listening, too.

+1

Offline Ghost of Baron Scarpia

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123124 on: October 18, 2018, 11:10:47 AM »
I love 'em!  All of the "big" 'uns left me entirely tepid.

Generally agree about the proper symphonies, especially as applied to the first 5 or so. The 10th was a hoot, however.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123125 on: October 18, 2018, 11:16:02 AM »


Marco Beasley has an attratcive voice for me because it sounds straight and modest, not contrived, living room sized. There's no Fischer Dieskau about him. No opera. This recording has some lovely lute and cornet (type thing) accompaniment too. The music is all renaissance Italian songs, rather refined music in fact, and modest like the voice. For me a nice discovery, the sort of thing that slaps a smile on my face.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2018, 11:19:01 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123126 on: October 18, 2018, 11:28:12 AM »
Beasley I know only for his performance of the solo tenor part in Casella’s La giara (on a Naxos CD, conducted by Christian Benda)  , and he’s very engaging.

Here’s his contribution, the lovely “La storia della fanciulla rapita dai pirata” (the music starts at 1’08”):

<a href="https://youtu.be/NU3y_6PmgJU" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://youtu.be/NU3y_6PmgJU</a>




EDIT (TD): Listening to the above recording of La giara right now. What a great work (an all-time favourite of mine).  :)

« Last Edit: October 18, 2018, 11:48:57 AM by ritter »
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Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123127 on: October 18, 2018, 12:19:56 PM »
Some brothel music tonight... ;)

The first European performance of Messiaen’s Turangalîla-Symphonie, which took place at the Aix-en-Provence Festival on 25 July 1950, with the great Roger Désormière conducting the ORTF orchestra, and with Yvonne Loriod at the piano and Ginette Martenot playing the ondes. CD 6 of this set:



Sound is only so-so (even for a 1950 broadcast), malheuresement:(


« Last Edit: October 18, 2018, 12:22:23 PM by ritter »
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Offline Draško

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123128 on: October 18, 2018, 12:22:13 PM »


Marco Beasley has an attratcive voice for me because it sounds straight and modest, not contrived, living room sized. There's no Fischer Dieskau about him. No opera. This recording has some lovely lute and cornet (type thing) accompaniment too. The music is all renaissance Italian songs, rather refined music in fact, and modest like the voice. For me a nice discovery, the sort of thing that slaps a smile on my face.

Beasley has a lovely voice. I like him a lot in both that early music pop and in songs from usual Italian early baroque cohorts. He is quite prolific, my favorites are Steffano Landi disc and La Bella Noeva, both on Alpha.

Offline North Star

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123129 on: October 18, 2018, 01:19:30 PM »
Beasley has a lovely voice. I like him a lot in both that early music pop and in songs from usual Italian early baroque cohorts. He is quite prolific, my favorites are Steffano Landi disc and La Bella Noeva, both on Alpha.
The Landi with Pluhar? Beasley sings just one song on that album, written by anonymous. I'll have to look into La Bella Noeva..
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Offline Draško

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123130 on: October 18, 2018, 02:31:10 PM »
The Landi with Pluhar? Beasley sings just one song on that album, written by anonymous. I'll have to look into La Bella Noeva..

I thought he sang more than one. Crap memory. Still an excellent disc.

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123131 on: October 18, 2018, 04:03:36 PM »


This is Nagano’s second recording of the 8th symphony. In 2005 he recorded the familiar revised version (1890, ed. Haas) with the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester, Berlin. At 89 minutes it was about 10 minutes slower than the average interpretation. On his second attempt in 2009 the conductor chose the different, longer, original version from 1887. The extra material is handled in the same way, meaning that the timing of this Munich concert is close to 100 minutes, the longest in the discography - save for a couple of Celibidache performances.

It is quite daring of Nagano to adopt such a spacious view of the work. Tempo markings in the adagio specify feierlich langsam doch nicht schleppend - solemn and slow but without dragging. The wonder is that it does not schlepp even at over 33 minutes. When he conducts in Germany Nagano is often on the slow side compared to his north american performances. He takes advantage of the germanic orchestral tradition, founded on solid, full, low string sound and softer attacks. The vocabulary may be the same, but the speech pattern is quite different. In Bruckner that also means more time to shape long musical paragraphs and cadential phrases. Pauses are longer, too. IOW the music’s breathing is very different. It’s a totally distinctive reality and I’m glad I can experience it.

Offline Gordo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123132 on: October 18, 2018, 04:52:06 PM »


This is Nagano’s second recording of the 8th symphony. In 2005 he recorded the familiar revised version (1890, ed. Haas) with the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester, Berlin. At 89 minutes it was about 10 minutes slower than the average interpretation. On his second attempt in 2009 the conductor chose the different, longer, original version from 1887. The extra material is handled in the same way, meaning that the timing of this Munich concert is close to 100 minutes, the longest in the discography - save for a couple of Celibidache performances.

It is quite daring of Nagano to adopt such a spacious view of the work. Tempo markings in the adagio specify feierlich langsam doch nicht schleppend - solemn and slow but without dragging. The wonder is that it does not schlepp even at over 33 minutes. When he conducts in Germany Nagano is often on the slow side compared to his north american performances. He takes advantage of the germanic orchestral tradition, founded on solid, full, low string sound and softer attacks. The vocabulary may be the same, but the speech pattern is quite different. In Bruckner that also means more time to shape long musical paragraphs and cadential phrases. Pauses are longer, too. IOW the music’s breathing is very different. It’s a totally distinctive reality and I’m glad I can experience it.

Thanks, André! Your note has worked out as a very successful teaser... I'm listening to it right now on Apple Music, through my airpods.

First impression? A gigantic (but polished and educated) sonic ambience.  :)
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Offline Daverz

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123133 on: October 18, 2018, 05:19:00 PM »
Mahler 6



This is a very well known recording by now.  This CD has the movements in order Scherzo/Andante.  Barbirolli's intention was Andante/Scherzo, so I restore his order in playback.

Online JBS

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123134 on: October 18, 2018, 05:22:27 PM »
Bruckner
Symphony 4
Gergiev Munich Philharmonic
Landed today, so this was a first listen.
My initial reaction can be found in Bruckner's Abbey.


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Offline Mandryka

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123135 on: October 18, 2018, 10:10:03 PM »


Carter Quartet 5, first time I’ve ever heard it. Is it just my imagination or are there really similarities to other pieces of chamber music written late in the life of the composers? I’m thinking of the Schoenberg trio, Bartok 6, Shostakovich 15. Part of what makes me think this is the structure of interludes and movements; the austerity; the rather disturbing sadness.
« Last Edit: October 18, 2018, 10:12:36 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123136 on: October 18, 2018, 10:27:34 PM »
Morning listening:


Q
À chacun son goût.

Offline 2dogs

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123137 on: October 19, 2018, 12:49:30 AM »
In some ways, my favorite from Tuesday's concert:

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/2tKeyWRP5h8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/2tKeyWRP5h8</a>

That was nice, I particularly liked the resonant chiming sounds, they added atmosphere around the other instruments :).

Offline Biffo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123138 on: October 19, 2018, 12:58:10 AM »
Mahler 6



This is a very well known recording by now.  This CD has the movements in order Scherzo/Andante.  Barbirolli's intention was Andante/Scherzo, so I restore his order in playback.

Annoyingly, the performance is spread over two discs with the break after the Scherzo. There is a Testament CD of a live performance Barbirolli gave shortly before making the EMI recording. The live performance is over 8 minutes quicker than the studio one and fits on one disc with the movements in the correct order (Andante - Scherzo); I greatly prefer this performance for both reasons.

Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #123139 on: October 19, 2018, 12:58:59 AM »


This is Nagano’s second recording of the 8th symphony. In 2005 he recorded the familiar revised version (1890, ed. Haas) with the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester, Berlin. At 89 minutes it was about 10 minutes slower than the average interpretation. On his second attempt in 2009 the conductor chose the different, longer, original version from 1887. The extra material is handled in the same way, meaning that the timing of this Munich concert is close to 100 minutes, the longest in the discography - save for a couple of Celibidache performances.

It is quite daring of Nagano to adopt such a spacious view of the work. Tempo markings in the adagio specify feierlich langsam doch nicht schleppend - solemn and slow but without dragging. The wonder is that it does not schlepp even at over 33 minutes. When he conducts in Germany Nagano is often on the slow side compared to his north american performances. He takes advantage of the germanic orchestral tradition, founded on solid, full, low string sound and softer attacks. The vocabulary may be the same, but the speech pattern is quite different. In Bruckner that also means more time to shape long musical paragraphs and cadential phrases. Pauses are longer, too. IOW the music’s breathing is very different. It’s a totally distinctive reality and I’m glad I can experience it.
Very interesting roundup, André. Thanks! I should revisit this recording, which I bought several years ago. I recall that in this original version, the marvellous filigree figures of the trumpets in the scherzo (one of my favourite moments in all of Bruckner’s output) are longer and more elaborate than in the revised version. I listen to it soon.
Ritter
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”Auch deine Träne ward zum Segenstaue: du weinest - sieh! es lacht die Aue”.