Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 8001303 times)

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Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128000 on: January 12, 2019, 08:12:12 AM »
Shakespeare's Musick

CD 1 

What could be more appropriate than this lovely song on this gloomy day.

    
It was a lover and his lass


Offline Christo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128001 on: January 12, 2019, 08:19:42 AM »
Do you know Boult's recording of Symphony 7?
Urged by Dundonnell, whose expertise in all matters regarding Rubbra and many more  ;D I highly value, I bought all the Lyrita recordings a couple of years ago. But didn't play them enough; am repenting of my sins now and concentrating on this wonderful Sixth & Eight first.  0:)
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 08:21:13 AM by Christo »
… music is not only an `entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Mirror Image

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    ...mist floating above the lake...
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128002 on: January 12, 2019, 08:38:06 AM »
Holst: Egdon Heath, Op 47 Homage to Thomas Hardy - Richard Hickox conducting the London Symphony Orchestra - atmospheric performance

Certainly one of the composers best works. In fact, I believe Holst said this was his favorite piece of music that he composed.
“Works of art make rules but rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Online Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128003 on: January 12, 2019, 08:52:08 AM »
This is a wonderful recital of works for 10-string guitar by contemporary Finnish composers. She plays two instruments--one is a "standard" 10 string guitar; the other is the one pictured on the cover--the extra bass strings do not have frets, which allows her to play quarter-tones. Only three pieces use that guitar, and only the Tiensuu makes extensive use of quarter tones. The other pieces are more accessible and quite impressionistic. She's an excellent player, too. I was surprised to find it wasn't an SACD since all of my other Alba discs are SACD, but it sounds very good.



"Muß es sein?"
"Es muß sein!"

Offline Cato

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128004 on: January 12, 2019, 09:01:32 AM »

This is a wonderful recital of works for 10-string guitar by contemporary Finnish composers. She plays two instruments--one is a "standard" 10 string guitar; the other is the one pictured on the cover--the extra bass strings do not have frets, which allows her to play quarter-tones. Only three pieces use that guitar, and only the Tiensuu makes extensive use of quarter tones. The other pieces are more accessible and quite impressionistic. She's an excellent player, too. I was surprised to find it wasn't an SACD since all of my other Alba discs are SACD, but it sounds very good.


You have my attention!!!  :D  Guitar music is not my thing normally, but a 10-string guitar with quarter-tones!  I will look into this!
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128005 on: January 12, 2019, 09:55:28 AM »
Shakespeare's Musick

CD 2


Offline SonicMan46

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128006 on: January 12, 2019, 12:30:45 PM »
Mozart, WA - Horn Concertos & Quintet w/ David Pyatt-Neville Marriner & Acad St. Martin - new arrival to complement my other modern horn recording, along w/ two discs w/ natural horn - the Pyatt is coupled w/ the Horn Quintet, an uncommon but welcomed combination.  Dave :)


Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128007 on: January 12, 2019, 12:39:14 PM »
Excellent. What did you think of that recording, Jeffrey?
Only heard it a few times John but sounds excellent to me although I listen on a not very expensive system.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128008 on: January 12, 2019, 12:42:13 PM »
Holst: Egdon Heath, Op 47 Homage to Thomas Hardy- Richard Hickox conducting the London Symphony Orchestra - atmospheric performance
Possibly Holst's masterpiece. A kind of Engish Tapiola.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128009 on: January 12, 2019, 12:43:38 PM »
Urged by Dundonnell, whose expertise in all matters regarding Rubbra and many more  ;D I highly value, I bought all the Lyrita recordings a couple of years ago. But didn't play them enough; am repenting of my sins now and concentrating on this wonderful Sixth & Eight first.  0:)

They are all great Johan but I think that there is something very special about Boult's performance of Symphony 7.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline cilgwyn

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128010 on: January 12, 2019, 01:29:19 PM »
Playing,now. Track 1,cd 2.Harriet Cohen,Bax's Mistress for 30 years,playing the first movement of Bach's Keyboard Concerto No1. A 1946 recording. A brilliant pianist. I'm really enjoying listening to her recordings. The transfers are superb. I only wish she could have recorded more complete works! :( But,there's 3 cd's of sheer pleasure,here. The booklet is excellent,with lots of interesting photos.


Offline cilgwyn

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128011 on: January 12, 2019, 01:54:14 PM »
Moeran's Sinfonietta. I just had to put it on after reading the enthusiastic posts,here! :)


Offline cilgwyn

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128012 on: January 12, 2019, 02:16:30 PM »
Now! Heifetz playing Korngold's Violin Concerto. First movement!


Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128013 on: January 12, 2019, 02:23:05 PM »


Two beautiful, very substantial cello concertos. I listened to each twice.

The Finzi opens with a somewhat blustery theme, almost melodramatically worked out to maximum effect. Having started with such a grand, sweeping flourish makes it somewhat hard to ‘back down’ musically, so parts of the development tend to lose steam in the process. The slow movement is a wonderful invention, its heart-on-sleeve sentiment kept in check by a welcome modesty, the composer rightly refusing to milk this plum of a theme. The last movement has a winning start, with a striking rythmic tune, but its jauntiness seems more appropriate for a « british light music » confection. While I think the work is of a high standard, I found the rather disparate character of its individual movements not wholly convincing.

The Leighton is more "serious", not immune to a feeling of harshness, courtesy of its sometimes dissonant, chromatic language. But it cannot disguise a solid foundation of late-romantic feelings. Unusually for a 3-movement concerto, the central movement is a scherzo and trio (allegro molto e ritmico - il piu presto possibile - moderato e dolce), while the last one is slow (lentissimo: molto sostenuto). These original touches are brought off successfully, the musical material living up to the composer’s structural adventurousness.

I also have the concerto coupled with the 3rd symphony, "Laudes musicae" for tenor and orchestra. I will listen to it tonight.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128014 on: January 12, 2019, 04:18:34 PM »


Two beautiful, very substantial cello concertos. I listened to each twice.

The Finzi opens with a somewhat blustery theme, almost melodramatically worked out to maximum effect. Having started with such a grand, sweeping flourish makes it somewhat hard to ‘back down’ musically, so parts of the development tend to lose steam in the process. The slow movement is a wonderful invention, its heart-on-sleeve sentiment kept in check by a welcome modesty, the composer rightly refusing to milk this plum of a theme. The last movement has a winning start, with a striking rythmic tune, but its jauntiness seems more appropriate for a « british light music » confection. While I think the work is of a high standard, I found the rather disparate character of its individual movements not wholly convincing.

The Leighton is more "serious", not immune to a feeling of harshness, courtesy of its sometimes dissonant, chromatic language. But it cannot disguise a solid foundation of late-romantic feelings. Unusually for a 3-movement concerto, the central movement is a scherzo and trio (allegro molto e ritmico - il piu presto possibile - moderato e dolce), while the last one is slow (lentissimo: molto sostenuto). These original touches are brought off successfully, the musical material living up to the composer’s structural adventurousness.

I also have the concerto coupled with the 3rd symphony, "Laudes musicae" for tenor and orchestra. I will listen to it tonight.
Leighton's Third Symphony is eloquent and moving - my favourite work by him.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128015 on: January 12, 2019, 04:56:16 PM »
Three impressive choral works:

Reger - Die Nonnen




Boulanger - Du fond de l'abime (Psaume 130)




Bloch - Sacred Service




The Reger surprised me by how different I thought of it at first. Much more pensive, less academic than the majority of his output, and with some cataclysmic climaxes!

About the Boulanger, it's simply incredible that a 22-year-old girl has composed such a towering masterpiece. Her choral writing is dramatic and quite sublime in some passages.

And finally, Bloch's Sacred Service... I was expecting something like this: epicness! And I received that for lots.

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128016 on: January 12, 2019, 05:00:28 PM »


This disc is a peach !

3 absolutely wonderful works. The Caribbean Concerto has a slow movement to die for. Film music composers would sell their soul for such a theme !


It, literally, is music for my ears. I must check it out.

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128017 on: January 12, 2019, 05:04:24 PM »
Leighton's Third Symphony is eloquent and moving - my favourite work by him.

And here it is, exactly as you describe it: moving and eloquent.



It could be argued that it is as much a song cycle as a symphony. It is cast in 3 movements, just like the cello concerto: first movement, followed by a scherzo, and ending with an adagio. It makes sense to view it as a symphony, meaning it has the structural cast of a symphonic work, despite its unusual layout. It is a powerful utterance, the more so as it avoids sounding like a Big Statement, relying instead on the creation of a strong atmosphere. The 3 poems are about the beauty of music.

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128018 on: January 12, 2019, 05:09:24 PM »
Three impressive choral works:

Reger - Die Nonnen




Boulanger - Du fond de l'abime (Psaume 130)




Bloch - Sacred Service




The Reger surprised me by how different I thought of it at first. Much more pensive, less academic than the majority of his output, and with some cataclysmic climaxes!

About the Boulanger, it's simply incredible that a 22-year-old girl has composed such a towering masterpiece. Her choral writing is dramatic and quite sublime in some passages.

And finally, Bloch's Sacred Service... I was expecting something like this: epicness! And I received that for lots.

+ 1 for the Boulanger and Reger. I must look for the Sacred Service. Bloch is such an intense composer ! Right now the 4th string quartet is in my cd player.

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128019 on: January 12, 2019, 06:02:02 PM »



Disc two.  More great early Beethoven.  Op 7, like 2/2, ends up being one of the greats.  The opening movement is light and bouncy, with Kempff tossing in rubato rather liberally, and while the Largo is slow and a bit solemn, it's not too heavy for this early work, and the Allegro and Rondo bounce along nicely.  And while not the last word in superhuman virtuosity, mid-40s Kempff's chops are fine.  The Op 10 trio has a predictable set of strengths and not so strong points.  (There are no real weaknesses.)  The not so strong points include opening ascending arpeggios in 10/1 that are a bit slower than I prefer, and a less than ideally intense climax in the Largo of 10/3, though part of that is due to the ancient recording.  The exclusion of the 10/2 Prestissimo repeat is a recording choice I wish would not have been made.  The rest of the playing is all top shelf, with an adroit mix of lightness, fun, drive, nice articulation, and a less dramatic and always flowing sound.  One could describe it as easy listening Beethoven, but it's too natural sounding for that.  Yep, it's sweet, sweet stuff.
The universe is change; life is opinion.   Marcus Aurelius, Meditations