Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 10924840 times)

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Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128020 on: January 12, 2019, 06:52:21 PM »
I wouldn't mind more intensity at times, but she plays very beautifully. Excellent sound.


Online Daverz

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128021 on: January 12, 2019, 07:18:12 PM »
sheer pleasure


Thought you'd get away with that one, did you.  ::)

Online Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128022 on: January 12, 2019, 07:22:45 PM »
Sibelius, Lyric Pieces op.74


A bit of Grieg, a bit of Debussy, a whole lot of quality. Time and again Mertanen is making Sibelius' piano output sound far more worthwhile than it's usually taken to be.
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SymphonicAddict

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128023 on: January 12, 2019, 07:28:29 PM »
The new(ish) Arnold Rosner symphony on Toccata:



The musical language in this work is strongly reminiscent of Shostakovich, or another similar composer (maybe Allan Pettersson?) but not without originality or individual interest. Not very easy to digest on a first listen as the music tends to be at a uniform level of intensity and is based on intervals rather than recogniseable themes, so will probably hold up better on a second listen.

One of my first great discoveries this year. Likely it sounds like Shostakovich but without the sarcasm. In terms of mood, the Pettersson connection is kind of apt too, I think.

SymphonicAddict

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128024 on: January 12, 2019, 07:51:48 PM »


Threni

I don't disclaim the artistic meaning of this work, but I can't say I have liked it. I'll need to give it more tries before giving up, I suppose.




Pizzetti - Messa di Requiem

This was much better. It's not the typical Requiem you would expect (both for the music itself and the lack of an orchestra). The music is rather peaceful, I didn't feel any presence of anger or despair (not even in the Dies irae section) and, overall conveys a sense of tranquillity. The inclusion of a children chorus was a nice plus.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128025 on: January 12, 2019, 08:20:21 PM »
Sculthorpe’s Memento mori from this recording:



Sibelius was to Finland what Sculthorpe is to Australia. One of the most unique voices to come from down under, IMHO.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128026 on: January 12, 2019, 08:34:18 PM »
Stanford’s The Blue Bird from this album:



The most moving performance I know of this short, but still exquisitely gorgeous piece.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline RebLem

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128027 on: January 12, 2019, 08:36:52 PM »
On Saturday, 12 JAN 2019, I listened to  2 CDs.


1. Jean Sibelius (1865-1957):  |Tr. 1-3.  Symphony 5 in E Flat Major, Op. 82 (30'24)  |Tr. 4-7.  Symphony 6 in D Minor, Op. 104  (28'53)--Paavo Berglund, cond., Helsinki Philharmonic Orch.  Rec. Helsinki Culture Hall, 18-19 DEC 1986 (#5), MAY, 1986 (#6).  CD 3 0f a 5 CD Warner Classics  set of the complete Sibelius symphonies, + selected other orchestral works. 

The Fifth is probably Sibelius's second most popular symphony, after the Second.  It is, uncharacteristically of Sibelius, an extroverted, optimistic work.  Originally composed in the traditional four movements, Sibelius later decided to combine the first two into one.  Horn calls are featured throughout, and I, for one, cannot listen to it without evoking images of mountain communities and scenes in my mind.   

The liner notes for the Sixth Symphony say, "The complete antithesis of its predecessor, all four movements of thee Sixth...eschew the grand manner in exchange for a stream of seamless musical poetics where everything appears to grow naturally and effortlessly out of what has preceded it."


2.  CD 4 of a 14 CD DECCA set entitled  "Arthur Grumiaux Mono Reocridngs."  |Tr. 1-3.  Mendelssohn (1809-47): Violin Concerto in E Minor, Op. 64  (26'31)--Rudolf Moralt, cond., Wiener Symphoniker--rec. 9/1954, Wien.  |Tr. 4-6.  Paganini (1782-1840):  Violin Concert 4 in D Minor  (29'22)--Franco Gallini, cond., Orchestre de Concerts Lamoureaux--rec. 11/1954, Paris.

The Mendelssohn seems profoundly introspective.  The Paganini is a nice contrast, certainly not as great a work, but happy and extroverted, with plenty of toe-tapping provocations.  If this were the last work on a program, you would be bound to walk out of the concert hall with a little spring in your step.
"Don't drink and drive; you might spill it."--J. Eugene Baker, aka my late father.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128028 on: January 12, 2019, 08:41:03 PM »
Stravinsky’s Violin Concerto



Still the best performance I know of this work, but Kopatchinskaja comes in a close second-place. I like Mutter’s performance a lot as well.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128029 on: January 12, 2019, 08:54:52 PM »
If I may, once again put on a word of commendation for the Liège Philharmonic big box  :D, it contains symphonies 3, 5, 6, 7 and 8, licensed from the original Auvidis Valois recordings.



That looks like quite a tasty set! ;) Great to see so much enthusiasm for Tournemire around here.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128030 on: January 12, 2019, 08:58:32 PM »
The pristine sound convinced me that I need to get some solo Maximilian Hornung stuff - to date, I've only heard his ensemble playing. 

You won't regret it; he's a really fantastic cellist. I recently saw him perform Shostakovich's Cello Concerto no. 1 with the Pittsburgh Symphony - an unforgettable experience.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128031 on: January 12, 2019, 09:04:43 PM »
Janáček: String Quartet No. 2, “Intimate Letters”

“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128032 on: January 12, 2019, 09:09:28 PM »


Two beautiful, very substantial cello concertos. I listened to each twice.

The Finzi opens with a somewhat blustery theme, almost melodramatically worked out to maximum effect. Having started with such a grand, sweeping flourish makes it somewhat hard to ‘back down’ musically, so parts of the development tend to lose steam in the process. The slow movement is a wonderful invention, its heart-on-sleeve sentiment kept in check by a welcome modesty, the composer rightly refusing to milk this plum of a theme. The last movement has a winning start, with a striking rythmic tune, but its jauntiness seems more appropriate for a « british light music » confection. While I think the work is of a high standard, I found the rather disparate character of its individual movements not wholly convincing.

Great stuff, André ('though I don't know the Leighton, yet)! I used to view the individual movements of the Finzi concerto as being too disparate, but recently I've come to appreciate the concerto as a truly convincing, cohesive whole, especially after listening to the Hugh/Griffiths (Naxos) and Watkins/Davis (Chandos) recordings. (I'm not too familiar with the Wallfisch recording, but I heard excerpts of it that didn't sound quite as good as the other recordings that are available.) I think that the finale, despite its jauntiness, is permeated with a touchingly nostalgic air ("smiling through tears") that is even more moving in the light of Finzi's impending death, of which he was aware.
« Last Edit: January 12, 2019, 09:44:07 PM by kyjo »
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128033 on: January 12, 2019, 09:13:39 PM »
Sculthorpe’s Memento mori from this recording:



Sibelius was to Finland what Sculthorpe is to Australia. One of the most unique voices to come from down under, IMHO.

Love that work - so haunting. Sculthorpe's Kakadu was another great recent discovery of mine with its ritualistic atmosphere and affirmatively moving ending.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128034 on: January 12, 2019, 09:51:15 PM »
Love that work - so haunting. Sculthorpe's Kakadu was another great recent discovery of mine with its ritualistic atmosphere and affirmatively moving ending.

Good to see another Sculthorpe fan. It has felt like I’ve been praising this composer all alone for years on here. :) Do you know his work Cello Dreaming? If you don’t know it, then please do check it out.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/ZKs7PWXs5o8" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/ZKs7PWXs5o8</a>
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128035 on: January 12, 2019, 09:56:22 PM »
One more work before bed:

Suite bergamasque

“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128036 on: January 13, 2019, 01:45:56 AM »
JS Bach: Christmas Oratorio, Part 1 [Herreweghe]


The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128037 on: January 13, 2019, 01:46:36 AM »
Mozart, WA - Horn Concertos & Quintet w/ David Pyatt-Neville Marriner & Acad St. Martin - new arrival to complement my other modern horn recording, along w/ two discs w/ natural horn - the Pyatt is coupled w/ the Horn Quintet, an uncommon but welcomed combination.  Dave :)



Did you enjoy the performances Dave?
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128038 on: January 13, 2019, 02:00:00 AM »
Three impressive choral works:

Reger - Die Nonnen




Boulanger - Du fond de l'abime (Psaume 130)




Bloch - Sacred Service




The Reger surprised me by how different I thought of it at first. Much more pensive, less academic than the majority of his output, and with some cataclysmic climaxes!

About the Boulanger, it's simply incredible that a 22-year-old girl has composed such a towering masterpiece. Her choral writing is dramatic and quite sublime in some passages.

And finally, Bloch's Sacred Service... I was expecting something like this: epicness! And I received that for lots.
I love the Sacred Service by Bloch and find it very moving. I often listen to it when in need of spiritual sustenance. My favourite recording is actually on Chandos conducted by Geoffrey Simon although this was how I first got to know the work on LP. Some sections remind me of Vaughan Williams.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

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Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #128039 on: January 13, 2019, 02:03:37 AM »
Relistening this morning:


This is very good, but I'm not completely won over....
As Johan van Veen points out in his review below, Skinner's reasoning behind the tinkering with the (Tudor) pitch of several of the motets to create a better transition from one motet to the next, is flawed. These motets were printed a a showpiece collection, not necessarily/probably not/obviously not to be performed as a unified sequence.

Anyway, Skinner uses one or two voices per part. To my ears the result occasionally lacks some clarity and sounds a bit murky. Whether this is due to performance, the transposition issue or acoustics (too large a venue?), I'm not sure. I also miss at times a certain directness in the perfomance style - when it sounds overly laboured, which makes it hard to connect to the music on an emotional level. "Bloodless", is term the Amazon reviewer uses, presuming we're thinking of the same...

These reservations aside, which vary noticeably from motet to motet,  this is a quite an enjoyable set with a performance style that makes a lot of steps in the right direction.
 
http://www.musica-dei-donum.org/cd_reviews/Obsidian_CD706.html
https://www.gramophone.co.uk/review/byrd-tallis-cantiones-sacrae
http://www.classical-music.com/review/complete-cantiones-sacrae-1575

Q