Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 9060901 times)

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Offline mc ukrneal

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135740 on: May 16, 2019, 03:47:11 AM »
I don't have it --- yet.
Looks like this:

Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135741 on: May 16, 2019, 03:48:41 AM »
Thanks, Peter. Very interesting.

The Dutch Wikipedia article mentions something about Mussolini  ???, that unfortunately neither I nor Google translate quite manage to grasp.

It says something to the effect that Mussolini and his regime glorifyed Aeneas as the founder of Rome, which was of course incorrect historically.
"I don’t know why I give preference to Chopin’s works. They always touch me deeply. His music is akin to my soul." --- Milii Balakirev

Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135742 on: May 16, 2019, 03:49:03 AM »
Looks like this:



Thanks, will look for it.
"I don’t know why I give preference to Chopin’s works. They always touch me deeply. His music is akin to my soul." --- Milii Balakirev

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135743 on: May 16, 2019, 03:51:26 AM »
\

Op. 106.

Terrible. I have no idea how this was released. I guess when you're the only guy on the West Coast who owns a fortepiano and are rich enough to bankroll your own recordings you can put out a halting, sight-read, pedal-drowned performance and try to sell it. Maybe the idea is to present an ultra-HIP version, i.e., what Beethoven's friends would have heard as the completely deaf composer bashed his manuscript out for them.

I guess the fortepiano would sound nice if it had a sympathetic interpreter who actually listened to the instrument, which Khouri isn't and doesn't.

Offline pjme

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135744 on: May 16, 2019, 04:11:52 AM »
The Dutch Wikipedia article mentions something about Mussolini  ???, that unfortunately neither I nor Google translate quite manage to grasp.

This might help. I quote Damien Top in the Timpani booklet:
"At the San Carlo in Naples, on 19 january 1937, an unparalled triumph greeted the finale (of Aeneas): May all peoples know Roman peace.
This rugged fresco proved to be in perfect - and quite unintentional- stylistic keeping with the formidable popular elan that was shaking Europe and became petrified in Arno Breker's Olympic statuary and the academic grandiloquence of the Foro Mussolini." (since 1944 Foro Italico).
Indeed, Weterings text for this final hymn has all the pompous ingredients to seduce the Italian fascists: "Rome est grande....Rome est puissante...Nous avons puisé notre force dans le lait de la louve....Nos buccins ont sonné face aux quatre vents...les rois captifs se sont inclinés....La force de notre peuple est pareille au soc qui retourne le sol...Nous avons brisés nos ennemis...." etc

Damien Top concludes :  "Like his character Roussel lives in his work of grandeur and peace , edified without weakness through the trials of an existence devoted entirely to music. By his faith in the greatness of mankind and civilisation , by the sublimation of high spirituality, Albert Roussel achieved in his finest works an unequaled feeling of universality. "

"The bits and the chains that the steeds shake during battle sound less
powerful than our voices for celebrating the altar of our gods. Rome is
great, and her gods are feared. Rome is powerful, and her gods respected.
Rome is beautiful, and her destinies envied. We have drawn our strength
from the milk of the she-wolf; our pride is our fortress; our ardour is our
shield. Our trumpets have rung out to the four winds, and our feet have
trod the entire world. The captive kings have bowed, the enemy legions
have been destroyed, and only desolate ruins mark the place where
proud rival cities rose. Our people’s strength is equal to the ploughshare
that turns over the soil, the same as the bronze that rips the flesh. Our
vessels cross the Ocean like birds that swim in the sky. We have brought
down the haughty and broken our enemies. Our laws reign over all. Be
praised, Aeneas, father of our grandeur, Aeneas, father of Rome, praised
be your name, praised be your memory, praised be he who sets destinies.
Praised be your name, Aeneas, praised by the voice, praised by the heart.
In song, in prayer, may all peoples know the pax romana."

Final hymn /Aeneas / translated by John Tyler Tuttle

ps: I translate "buccins" as "trumpets", not as "whelks" 'in the booklet)!! Whelks can be eaten...
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 04:25:25 AM by pjme »

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135745 on: May 16, 2019, 04:31:15 AM »
I guess the fortepiano would sound nice if it had a sympathetic interpreter who actually listened to the instrument, which Khouri isn't and doesn't.


This recording of 106 shows the difference between an interpreter who is incompetent but sympathetic (Schnabel) vs. one who is not only incompetent but unsympathetic (Khouri).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135746 on: May 16, 2019, 04:39:50 AM »
Walton
Belshazzar’s Feast
Te Deum
Cello Concerto

Royal Scottish National Orchestra Chorus, Royal Scottish National Orchestra, Scottish Festival Brass Bands
Sir Alexander Gibson
Sherill Milnes (baritone)
Ralph Kirshbaum (cello)


“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135747 on: May 16, 2019, 04:47:36 AM »
New acquisition. First listen. CD 1 from 4.
Norbert Burgmuller, Orchestral Works.
Overture for Orchestra opus 5 in F major for the opera Dionys.
Symphony No. 2 opus 11 in D major.
Piano Concerto, opus 11 in F sharp major.


Leonard Hokanson, piano.
Wuppertal SO, Gernot Schmalfuss.

The recordings are licensed from MDG, well the first 3 of them.  So in terms of sound and performance you can expect a reasonable quality. MDG was never strong in orchestral recording, neither did they choose top orchestras to perform. This said all is quite decent, thanks to Schmalfuss, who is a well respected conductor. Hokanson is a new name to me, but he performance is top notch. Burgmuller died very young and was hugely lamented by Robert Schumann, and Mendelssohn, as well as by Louis Spohr. His life was a tragic one, and his output not very large, but what there is really good and quite promising. All three works on the first CD are musically of a very high calibre. Well orchestrated and musically strong in melody and balance. He writes well for every desk. It's only sad that due to the somewhat diffuse sound many details are lost. Apart from that I am very happy with this box. Really!
There comes a point in your life when you realize: Who matters, Who never did, Who won't anymore, And who always will. So, don't worry about people from your past, there's a reason why they didn't make it to your future.

Online ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135748 on: May 16, 2019, 04:58:25 AM »
This might help. I quote Damien Top in the Timpani booklet:
"At the San Carlo in Naples, on 19 january 1937, an unparalled triumph greeted the finale (of Aeneas): May all peoples know Roman peace.
This rugged fresco proved to be in perfect - and quite unintentional- stylistic keeping with the formidable popular elan that was shaking Europe and became petrified in Arno Breker's Olympic statuary and the academic grandiloquence of the Foro Mussolini." (since 1944 Foro Italico).
Indeed, Weterings text for this final hymn has all the pompous ingredients to seduce the Italian fascists: "Rome est grande....Rome est puissante...Nous avons puisé notre force dans le lait de la louve....Nos buccins ont sonné face aux quatre vents...les rois captifs se sont inclinés....La force de notre peuple est pareille au soc qui retourne le sol...Nous avons brisés nos ennemis...." etc

Damien Top concludes :  "Like his character Roussel lives in his work of grandeur and peace , edified without weakness through the trials of an existence devoted entirely to music. By his faith in the greatness of mankind and civilisation , by the sublimation of high spirituality, Albert Roussel achieved in his finest works an unequaled feeling of universality. "

"The bits and the chains that the steeds shake during battle sound less
powerful than our voices for celebrating the altar of our gods. Rome is
great, and her gods are feared. Rome is powerful, and her gods respected.
Rome is beautiful, and her destinies envied. We have drawn our strength
from the milk of the she-wolf; our pride is our fortress; our ardour is our
shield. Our trumpets have rung out to the four winds, and our feet have
trod the entire world. The captive kings have bowed, the enemy legions
have been destroyed, and only desolate ruins mark the place where
proud rival cities rose. Our people’s strength is equal to the ploughshare
that turns over the soil, the same as the bronze that rips the flesh. Our
vessels cross the Ocean like birds that swim in the sky. We have brought
down the haughty and broken our enemies. Our laws reign over all. Be
praised, Aeneas, father of our grandeur, Aeneas, father of Rome, praised
be your name, praised be your memory, praised be he who sets destinies.
Praised be your name, Aeneas, praised by the voice, praised by the heart.
In song, in prayer, may all peoples know the pax romana."

Final hymn /Aeneas / translated by John Tyler Tuttle

ps: I translate "buccins" as "trumpets", not as "whelks" 'in the booklet)!! Whelks can be eaten...
Thanks again, Peter! This clarifies it quite a lot (even if Damien Top's comment appears almost as grandiloquent as Weterings's text for the final hymn  ;D).

Fortunately, we today do not really have to worry that much whether a Franco-Belgian work dealing with ancient Roman myths was (or wasn't) agreeable to the then dictator of another country, and more so since AFAIK Roussel's political stance (whatever it was) hasn't really trascended, and he was dead by the time things in Europe really got nasty. So we can appreciate the work on its merits (or lack thereof) alone.

It's as if someone in Spain told me not to listen to Falla's Atlántida, as its glorification of Barcelona (using Verdaguers's text) will certainly delight the Catalan secssionists (well, the few of them I expect to have any sort of artistic concerns  ::)).
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 05:04:49 AM by ritter »
ritter
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« Des yeux purs dans les bois
Cherchent en pleurant la tête habitable »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135749 on: May 16, 2019, 05:05:35 AM »
TD:

Jean Martinon conducts Albert Roussel's choral ballet Aeneas:


I had listened to this work some years ago, but it didn't make much of an impression. This time around, I'm finding it quite attractive. It's not easy to find background information on the piece, but I'll try to do some resaech on it, as it's rather interesting.

From the Roussel Edition on Erato:



G’day, Rafael. I listened Roussel’s Aeneas for the first-time yesterday and rather enjoyed it. A few more listens will have to be in order for me to say whether I think it’s a good piece. I can say I don’t think it’s a bad. This was to be Roussel’s last work in this particular medium. As with pjme, I listened to the Tovey performance from Timpani, but would love to get around to the Martinon at some point.
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135750 on: May 16, 2019, 05:18:28 AM »
TD. Second listen. CD 2 of 2.
Emilie Mayer.
String Quartet in G minor.
Piano sonata in D minor.
Tonwellen, Valse, for piano solo.
Marcia in D major.


Klenke Quartett.
Yang Tai, piano.

Dedicated to chamber music the second CD holds many surprises from this hugely talented female composer. She is forgotten, and to my ears that's not correct at all. This twofar recorded on the label Capriccio, is one made with a clear goal, namely to prove how good she really was. Her orchestral works are smashingly beautiful, and the chamber works are no less. So mission accomplished, performance wise and in sound. She holds the light with such luminaries as Louise Farrenc and Dora Pejacevic, and also Helen Bucholtz, to name a few. I sincerely hope Meyer gets more attention recording wise.
Recommended.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 05:20:01 AM by "Harry" »
There comes a point in your life when you realize: Who matters, Who never did, Who won't anymore, And who always will. So, don't worry about people from your past, there's a reason why they didn't make it to your future.

Online ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135751 on: May 16, 2019, 05:19:46 AM »
G’day, Rafael. I listened Roussel’s Aeneas for the first-time yesterday and rather enjoyed it. A few more listens will have to be in order for me to say whether I think it’s a good piece. I can say I don’t think it’s a bad. This was to be Roussel’s last work in this particular medium. As with pjme, I listened to the Tovey performance from Timpani, but would love to get around to the Martinon at some point.
Good day to you as well, John. Yes, the piece probably warrants repeated, attentive listening to get a good grasp of it.

TD:

CD 3 of this (music from 1926 to 1938):


ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
« Des yeux purs dans les bois
Cherchent en pleurant la tête habitable »

Offline pjme

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135752 on: May 16, 2019, 05:19:59 AM »
Thanks again, Peter! This clarifies it quite a lot (even if Damien Top's comment appears almost as grandiloquent as Weterings's text for the final hymn  ;D).

Fortunately, we today do not really have to worry that much whether a Franco-Belgian work dealing with ancient Roman myths was (or wasn't) agreeable to the then dictator of another country, and more so since AFAIK Roussel's political stance (whatever it was) hasn't really trascended, and he was dead by the time things in Europe really got nasty. So we can appreciate the work on its merits (or lack thereof) alone.



Haha! Damien Top (what's in a name...) has a knack for good old fashioned french "grandiloquence" !
Crescendo magazine mocks Top's style:  "Le style de l'ouvrage est clair et accessible, mais l'auteur n'a pas résisté de temps en temps à son péché mignon, l'emploi de mots rares : palingénésie, misonéisme, dynamogénie, dysphorie, avant-ouïrs..."
- but Top definitely is a connoisseur of French music 1900-1950.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 05:22:28 AM by pjme »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135753 on: May 16, 2019, 05:26:41 AM »
Good day to you as well, John. Yes, the piece probably warrants repeated, attentive listening to get a good grasp of it.

Since we’re on the topic of Roussel, I’d love to know some of your favorite works of his, Rafael? I know the String Quartet made a rather strong impression on you. Anything else?
“Works of art make rules; rules do not make works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135754 on: May 16, 2019, 05:39:25 AM »
Facing some peer pressure from last night.  ;D


Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135755 on: May 16, 2019, 06:28:26 AM »
Two unrelated threads of listening in the last couple of days;

revisiting and re-appreciating several of Bryden Thomsons cycles for Chandos - the Bax and the Martinu.  Certainly with the Bax I am guilty of having snapped Thomson's discs up when they were first released and then I 'moved on' as the Naxos cycle came and then of course Handley's all-in-one-go set.  Both of which are fine but not 'better' than Thomson in any respect.  In fact I rather like the weighty occasionally oppressive atmosphere Thomson evokes - preferable to Lloyd-Jones on Naxos which sounds just a little too much like a very skilled read-record to me now.......

Second thread was coming back to another disc not listened to for YEARS;



Jerome Moross will always be thought of first and foremost as composer of "The Big Country" but I really enjoyed this disc.  Yes it is in the spirit of Copland and other 'wide open space' composers but none the worst for that.  I especially enjoyed the filler of "Variations on a Waltz" which one Amazon reviewer sniffily dismisses as "the theme is pretty undistinguished and there isn’t much Moross’s pyrotechnics can do to change that. Mild, inconsequential fun for one listening".  Perish the thought you should ever get simple pleasure from music - only profound music here please!!!

Bright alert playing from the LSO and - as far as I can tell - sensitive and enthusiastic conducting by JoAnn Falletta

Offline SonicMan46

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135756 on: May 16, 2019, 06:45:35 AM »
Still going through my British composers collection - up now for the morning's listening:

Finzi, Gerald (1901-1956) - music on the discs shown below - Dave :)

   

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135757 on: May 16, 2019, 07:40:38 AM »
Facing some peer pressure from last night.  ;D


Brian's Sixth is one of my preferred Brian symphonies, and the first listen to the Bliss clarinet quintet was very very nice indeed, but Checkmate - now this is a fun ballet, with lots of bold Scottish brass and exuberant color. Awesome!

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135758 on: May 16, 2019, 07:44:33 AM »
Brian's Sixth is one of my preferred Brian symphonies, and the first listen to the Bliss clarinet quintet was very very nice indeed, but Checkmate - now this is a fun ballet, with lots of bold Scottish brass and exuberant color. Awesome!

There's more to the B's than Bach, Beethoven and Brahms, eh? :)

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #135759 on: May 16, 2019, 08:15:38 AM »
Schumann - Papillons op.2, Davidsbündlertänze Op.6 (Kempff)



Olivier

 

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