Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 8847536 times)

jwinter (+ 1 Hidden) and 13 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138640 on: July 12, 2019, 07:48:45 AM »
  Love when that happens. I have that in my player now (Actually, I have a 5 disk carousel, so it finished playing a bit ago, but still quite a coincidence :) )

 Now playing this:



we  share a good taste.... ;)

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138641 on: July 12, 2019, 07:51:46 AM »
Excellent, Traverso;)

That Richter recording was my introduction to the suites as well.  The La Petite Bande recording remains a favorite of mine today.

I'll join you in some Bach listening:



another  coincidence,the same introduction to these beautiful suites,it is my favorite too.

cilgwyn

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138642 on: July 12, 2019, 08:03:09 AM »
Bax's Piano Sonatas;of which I'm,a bit of a fan!! This,hard to find,at a reasonable price,cd set,arrived today. Difficult to find a decent photo. I'll have to scan my own! Interesting to hear a French pianist in this repertoire. I had her recording of Bowen's Preludes. The French cd release,actually,preceding,the acclaimed Hyperion recording,which,subsequently,got the credit for,kick-starting,the York Bowen revival. The French cd,however,included the complete preludes. I'm not an admirer of Bowen;but it sounded,very good,to me. This will take a while to digest! I wish the sonatas had been placed in order,though. I'll have to rip it onto some cd-r's. I did this with the Eric Parkin recordings.


Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138643 on: July 12, 2019, 08:56:00 AM »
This is still my favorite recording. Some newer ones might have a bit more transparency (although this LP still sounds pretty good), but I love this interpretation and performance.


Offline listener

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138644 on: July 12, 2019, 10:08:09 AM »
PFITZNER;  Palestrina -  3 preludes,  Die Kätchen von Heilbronn: Overture
Die Rose vom Liebesgarten: Blütenwunder and Trauermarsch
Bavarian Radio S.O.      Wolfgang Sawallisch
                      3 Cello Concertos
David Geringas, cello   Bamberg S.O.    Werner Andreas Albert, cond.
"Keep your hand on the throttle and your eye on the rail as you walk through life's pathway."

Offline Brewski

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138645 on: July 12, 2019, 10:42:46 AM »
This is still my favorite recording. Some newer ones might have a bit more transparency (although this LP still sounds pretty good), but I love this interpretation and performance.



One of the greats, for sure. These days, I am liking a bit more ruggedness in Bruckner, but this recording still stands up quite well. PS, when this cycle came out, my brother (who loves it, too) referred to it as the "dead bird series."  ;D

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Offline Brewski

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138646 on: July 12, 2019, 10:59:07 AM »
Schnittke: Concerto Grosso No. 3 (Chailly/Concertgebouw) -- References to Bach abound here. It would be interesting to hear from someone who is able to recognize bits of the Brandenburgs, as well as the Well-Tempered Clavier. (I get some, but not all.) The ensemble also includes four bells that spell out "BACH," which appear here and there.

One of my favorite recordings from the Chailly years with this orchestra.



--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

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Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138647 on: July 12, 2019, 11:05:15 AM »


On these days I've concluded listening to the Beethoven's complete piano sonatas played by Barenboim, and I have to mention a cliche-but-necessary thought about it: it's definitely the most compelling and magnificent sonata corpus in existence. No other reaches such level of creativity and majesty like the Beethoven IMO. I'm amazed by the resourcefoulness and variety of ideas, moods and poetry displayed here. If I had to pick my very favorite among them, it would be the last one (Op. 111). A turbulent 1st movement, which seems foreshadowing some Liszt ideas. But it's the 2nd movement that impresses me the most. The Arietta is so pure, sincere, intimate but so simple at the same time. I remember the first time I heard it. That tender melody stuck on my mind since then. I find it very moving. And the subsequent variations prove once again the masterly technique of this genius, simply gorgeous. The boogie-woogie-like passage is another remarkable, even contrasting moment in this movement. It shows that Beethoven was ahead of his time. Barenboim play this sonata with real profoundity (above all the 2nd movement). That performance did click on me at the point of blowing me away.

Other outstanding sonatas were the Opp. 110, 109, 106 (3rd movement!), 101, 57, 54, 27-1, 26, 22, 14 and 2. The ones that underwhelm me a bit were the Op. 27-2 Moonlight and Op. 31-2 Tempest.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2019, 11:07:05 AM by SymphonicAddict »

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138648 on: July 12, 2019, 11:21:49 AM »
First-listen Wednesday
Arnold
Symphony for Strings, Op. 13*
Symphony no. 1, Op. 22**
BBC Concert Orchestra*
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra**
Vernon Handley



I've somehow avoided exploring Arnold's music thus far. These were both very enjoyable and intriguing works, I'll definitely spend a lot more time with his music in the near future.

He’s certainly a composer well worth exploring! :)
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138649 on: July 12, 2019, 11:34:26 AM »


On these days I've concluded listening to the Beethoven's complete piano sonatas played by Barenboim, and I have to mention a cliche-but-necessary thought about it: it's definitely the most compelling and magnificent sonata corpus in existence. No other reaches such level of creativity and majesty like the Beethoven IMO. I'm amazed by the resourcefoulness and variety of ideas, moods and poetry displayed here. If I had to pick my very favorite among them, it would be the last one (Op. 111). A turbulent 1st movement, which seems foreshadowing some Liszt ideas. But it's the 2nd movement that impresses me the most. The Arietta is so pure, sincere, intimate but so simple at the same time. I remember the first time I heard it. That tender melody stuck on my mind since then. I find it very moving. And the subsequent variations prove once again the masterly technique of this genius, simply gorgeous. The boogie-woogie-like passage is another remarkable, even contrasting moment in this movement. It shows that Beethoven was ahead of his time. Barenboim play this sonata with real profoundity (above all the 2nd movement). That performance did click on me at the point of blowing me away.

Other outstanding sonatas were the Opp. 110, 109, 106 (3rd movement!), 101, 57, 54, 27-1, 26, 22, 14 and 2. The ones that underwhelm me a bit were the Op. 27-2 Moonlight and Op. 31-2 Tempest.

Great analysis, Cesar! You’ve inspired me to explore the Beethoven sonatas more deeply.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138650 on: July 12, 2019, 04:00:07 PM »
Nielsen, Piano Suite op.45



Before buying this box, primarily for the string music, I bought another set of the piano music performed by John McCabe. Partly this was because of reviews with a less favourable view of Herman Koppel's performances in this box.

I'm generally finding Koppel's performances to be the more interesting ones to listen to. There's a dynamism and fantasy here that McCabe doesn't often seem to have. I don't know how much of it is the recording (again, I saw less favourable comments about Koppel's recording quality but the sound is absolutely fine) and how much is the performances, but at this stage I'm wondering how many times in a direct A/B comparison I'd favour McCabe.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138651 on: July 12, 2019, 05:01:52 PM »


Andriessen’s instrument was the organ. He was organist at the Utrecht cathedral, where his improvisations drew crowds. He also taught composition and was director of the Utrecht and Hague conservatories. A Franck admirer, he wrote a book on the belgian composer. Here we have the four big chorales (1913-1921) interspersed with other compositions. The generous program is intelligently laid out, alternating the impressive, turbulent chorales with shorter, mostly meditative pieces.

The Leeds Cathedral organ was restored in 2010 by Klais. It is a very fine instrument. The building being on the small side for a cathedral, the reverb time is rather short, which allows great clarity. This is a most rewarding disc of Andriessen’s organ oeuvre. I was more than once reminded of his slightly older contemporary, the swede Otto Olsson, who held similar positions in Stockholm and whose music is also hugely impressive.

A warm recommendation for organ lovers.

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138652 on: July 12, 2019, 07:31:50 PM »
Great analysis, Cesar! You’ve inspired me to explore the Beethoven sonatas more deeply.

Thank you! Yes, why not? Do it when you can!

Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138653 on: July 12, 2019, 07:53:53 PM »


D959—up there with my favourites for this sonata.

Also I've noted that several of the other volumes of Aki Takahashi's Schubert series seem to be out of print (D894/575, D784/845, D946/940, D850/760)—if anyone has any hot tips on where to purchase them for a reasonable price let me know.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138654 on: July 12, 2019, 09:59:28 PM »


D959—up there with my favourites for this sonata.

Also I've noted that several of the other volumes of Aki Takahashi's Schubert series seem to be out of print (D894/575, D784/845, D946/940, D850/760)—if anyone has any hot tips on where to purchase them for a reasonable price let me know.

Noted and a five minute sample makes it sound interestingly melancholic and very well recorded. I shall listen next time I'm in the mood for long form Schubert.
« Last Edit: July 12, 2019, 10:08:41 PM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen


Offline Maestro267

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138656 on: July 13, 2019, 05:42:06 AM »
Lajtha: Symphony No. 8
Pécs SO/Pasquet

Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138657 on: July 13, 2019, 05:49:26 AM »
Albéniz
Iberia
Jean-François Heisser

Also known, for those who remember this, as the Joyce Hatto recording.

Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138658 on: July 13, 2019, 07:58:38 AM »
Classical music from another part of the world

CD1

Anthology of World Music  Iran
Variations in the Chahargah mode, played on the kamantche
by Ashgar Bahari
   
Poem of Saadi, sung in the Segah mode
by Golpayegani
   
The Dashti mode, played on the sehtar
by Ebrahimi
   
Poem of Saadi, sung in the mode Bayote-Isphahan and its variations
by Golpayegani



 <a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/2FHLXTt_McU" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/2FHLXTt_McU</a>
« Last Edit: July 13, 2019, 08:26:08 AM by Traverso »

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #138659 on: July 13, 2019, 08:11:30 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/OS5KVlN99M8" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/OS5KVlN99M8</a>
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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